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Price 10 cents 



ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



OFFICIAL 

^oot Ball Guide 



Edited H — —"^ C_>£°' r ' 

f\ ^ New Rules 

Nf» American Sports Publishing Co. 

; jL|i-^4pi..S'rfi" ,,s 'a 2/ Warren Stree£,A r ewl'br/C #SJwd 





A.G.Spalding & Bros. 

MAINTAIN THEIR OWN HOUSES 
FOR DISTRIBUTING THE 

Spalding 

^^ COMPLETE LINE OF 

Athletic Goods 

; IN THE FOLLOWING CITIES 




s^ss^ 



NEW YORK 

Do i24l n i28 Nassau St. 
WP 29-33 West 42d St. 
NEWARK, N. J. 

845 Broad Street 
BOSTON, MASS. 

141 Federal Street 


CHICAGO 

28-30 S. Wabash Ave. 
ST. LOUIS, MO. 

415 North Seventh St. 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

1120 Grand Ave. 
DENVER, COL. 

1616 Arapahoe St. 


SAN FRANCISCO 

156-158 Geary St. 
SEATTLE, WASH. 

711 Second Ave. 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. 
435 South Spring St. 








BUFFALO, N. Y. 

611 Main Street 
SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

University Block 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

608 Wood Street 


CINCINNATI, O. 

119 East Fifth St. 
CLEVELAND, O. 

741 Euclid Ave. 
COLUMBUS, O. 

191 South High St. 


MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

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MINNEAPOLIS.MINN. 
44 Seventh St., South 
ST. PAUL, MINN. 

386 Minnesota St. 








PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
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BALTIMORE, MD. 

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WASHINGTON, D. C. 

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INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

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ATLANTA, GA. 

74 N. Broad Street 
NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

140 Carondelet St. 
DALLAS, TEX. 

1503 Commerce St. 








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(Cor. Princes St.) 


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Communications directed to A. G. SPALDING fk BROS., 
at any of the above addresses, will receive prompt attention. 





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uimMyj i . i g iii fl| i BWiqu i |iivil Bl WiM: ! l i >ii ! Ul i MW8 ! w i i ; 



THE SPALDING TRADE MARK IS 
REGISTERED IN THE UNITED STATES 
PATENT OFFICE, AND WE HAVE ALSO 
PROTECTED OUR INTERESTS BY 39 
REGISTRATIONS IN FOREIGN COUN- 
TRIES, j INFRINGERS ARE WARNED. 




THE SPALDING TRADE-MARK IS THE 
FOUNDATION OF THE SPALDING BUSINESS 



Spalding's 
Athletic Library 

Anticipating the present ten- 
dency of the American people 
toward a healthful method of living: 
and enjoyment, Spalding's Athletic 
Library was established in 1892 for 
the purpose of encouraging ath- 
letics in every form, not only by 
publishing the official rules and 
records pertaining to the various 
pastimes, but also by instructing., 
until to-day Spalding's Athletic 
Library is unique in its own par- 
ticular field and has been conceded 
the greatest educational series on 
athletic and physical training sub- 
jects that has ever been compiled. 
The publication of a distinct 
series of books devoted to athletic 
sports and pastimes and designed 
to occupy the premier place in 
America in its class was an early 
idea of Mr. A. G. Spalding, who 
was one of the first in America 
to publish a handbook devoted to 
athletic sports, Spalding's Official 
Base Ball Guide being the initial 
number, which was followed at intervals with other handbooks on the 
sports prominent in the '70s. 

Spalding's Athletic Library has had the advice and counsel of Mr. A. G. 
Spalding in all of its undertakings, and particularly in all books devoted 
to the national game. This applies especially to Spalding's Official 
Base Ball Guide and Spalding's Official Base Ball Record, both of which 
receive the personal attention of Mr. A. G. Spalding, owing to his early 
connection with the game as the leading pitcher of the champion Boston 
and Chicago teams of 1872-76. His interest does not stop, however, with 
matters pertaining to base ball; there is not a sport that Mr. Spalding 
does not make it his business to become familiar with, and that the 
Library will always maintain its premier place, with Mr. Spalding's able 
counsel at hand, goes without saying. 

The entire series since the issue of the first number has been under 
the direct personal supervision of Mr. James E. Sullivan, President 
of the American Sports Publishing Company, and the total series of 
consecutive numbers reach an aggregate of considerably over three 
hundred, included in which are many "annuals," that really constitute 
the history of their particular sport in America year by year, back copies 
of which are even now eagerly sought for, constituting as they do thl 
really first authentic records of events and official rules that have ever 
been consecutively compiled. 

When Spalding's Athletic Library was founded, seventeen years ago, 
track and field athletics were practically unknown outside the larger 
colleges and a few athletic clubs in the leading cities, which gave occa- 
sional meets, when an entry list of 250 competitors was a subject of com- 
ment; golf was known only by a comparatively few persons; lawn tennis 
bad some vogue and base ball was practically the only established field 




Spalding 



EDITORS OF SPALD/NG'S^THLETm LIBRARY 

sport, and that in a professional way; basket ball had just been invented; 
athletics for the schoolboy — and schoolgirl— weje almost unknown, and 
an advocate of class contests in athletics in the schools cpuld not get a 
hearing. To-day we find the greatest body of athletes in the world ia 
the Public Schools Athletic League of Greater New York, which has had 
an entry list at its annual games of over two thousand, and in whose 
"elementary series" in base ball last year 106 schools competed for the 
trophy emblematic of the championship. 

While Spalding's Athletic Library cannot claim that the rapid growth 
of athletics in this country is due to it solely, the fact cannot be denied 
that the books have had a great deal to do with its encouragement, by 
printing the official rules and instructions for playing the various games 
at a nominal price, within the reach of everyone, with the sole object 
that its series might be complete and the one place where a person 
could look with absolute certainly for the particular book in which he 
might be interested. 

In selecting the editors and writers for the various books, the lead- 
ing authority in his particular line has been obtained, with the result 
that no collection of books on athletic subjects can compare with 
Spalding's Athletic Library for the prominence of the various authors 
and their ability to present their subjects in a thorough and practical 
manner. 

A short sketch of a few of those who have edited some of the lead' 
ing numbers of Spalding's Athletic Library is ^iven herewith : 



JAMES E. SULLIVAN 

President American Sports Publishing Com- 
pany; entered the publishing house of Frank 
Leslie in 1878, and has been connected continu- 
ously with the publishing business since then 
and also as athletic editor of various New 
York papers; was a competing athlete; one of 
the organizers of the Amateur Athletic Union 
of the United States; has been actively on its 
board of governors since its organization until 
the present time, and President for two suc- 
cessive terms; has attended every champion- 
ship meeting in America since 1879 and has officiated in some capacity in 
connection with American amateur championships track and field games 
for nearly twenty-five years; assistant American director Olympic Games, 
Paris, 1900; director Pan-American Exposition athletic department, 1901; 
chief department physical culture Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. 
Louis, 1904; secretary American Committee Olympic Games, at Athens, 
1906; honorary director of Athletics at Jamestown Exposition, 1907; secre- 
tary American Committee Olympic Games, at London, 1908; member of 
the Pastime A. C, New York; honorary member Missouri A. C, St. Louis; 
honorary member Olympic A. C, San Francisco; ex-president Pastime 
A. C, New Jersey A. C, Knickerbocker A. C; president Metropolitan 
Association of the A. A. U. for fifteen years; president Outdoor Recrea- 
tion League; with Dr. Luther H. Gulick organized the Public Schools 
Athletic League of New York, and is now chairman of its games commit- 
tee and member executive committee; was a pioneer in playground work 
and one of the organizers of the Outdoor Recreation League of New York ; 
appointed by President Roosevelt as special commissioner to the Olympic 
Games at Athens, 1906, and decorated by King George I. of the Hellenes 
(Greece) for his services in connection with the Olympic Games; ap- 
pointed special commissioner by President Roosevelt to the Olympic 
Games at London, 1908; appointed by Mayor McClellan, 1908, as member 
ef the Board of Education of Greater New York. 




EDITORS OF SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 




WALTER CAMP 

For quarter of a century Mr. Walter Camp 
of Yale has occupied a leading- position in col- 
lege athletics. It is immaterial what organiza- 
tion is suggested for college athletics, or for 
the betterment of conditions, insofar as college 
athletics is concerned, Mr. Camp has always 
played an important part in its conferences, 
and the great interest in and high plane of 
college sport to-day, are undoubtedly due more 
to Mr. Camp than to any other individual. Mr. 
Camp has probably written more on college 
athletics than any other writer and the leading papers and maga- 
zines of America are always anxious to secure his expert opinion on foot 
"ball, track and field athletics, base ball and rowing. Mr. Camp has grown 
up with Yale athletics and is a part of Yale's remarkable athletic system. 
While he has been designated as the "Father of Foot Ball/' it is a well 
known fact that during his college career Mr. Camp was regarded as one 
•cf the best players that ever represented Yale on the base ball field, so 
when we hear of Walter Camp as a foot ball expert we must also remem- 
ber his remarkable knowledge of the game of base ball, of which he is a 
great admirer. Mr. Camp has edited Spalding's Official Foot Ball Guide 
since it was first published, and also the Spalding Athletic Library book 
on How to Play Foot Ball. There is certainly no man in American college 
life better qualified to write for Spalding's Athletic Library than Mr* 
•Camp. 



DR. LUTHER HALSEY GULICK 

The leading exponent of physical training 
Sn America; one who has worked hard to im- 
press the value of physical training in the 
schools; when physical training was combined 
with education at the St. Louis Exposition in 
1904 Dr. Gulick played an important part in 
that congress; he received several awards for 
his good work and had many honors conferred 
upon him; he is the author of a great many 
books on the subject; it was Dr. Gulick, who, 
acting on the suggestion of James E. Sullr.van, 
organized the Public Schools Athletic League of Greater New York, and 
was its first Secretary; Dr. Gulick was also for several years Director of 
Physical Training in the public schools of Greater New York, resigning 
the position to assume the Presidency of the Playground Association of 
America. Dr. Gulick is an authority on all subjects pertaining to phys- 
ical training and the study of the child. 





JOHN B. FOSTER 

Successor to the late Henry Chadwick 
("Father of Base Ball") as editor of Spald- 
ing's Official Base Ball Guide; sporting editor 
of the New York Evening Telegram; has 
been in the newspaper business for many 
years and is recognized throughout America 
as a leading writer on the national game; a 
staunch supporter of organized base ball, 
his pen has always been used for the better* 
ment of the game. 



EDITORS OF SPALDING' S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 




TIM MURNANE 

Base Ball editor of the Boston Globe and 
President of the New England League of 
Base Ball Clubs; one of the best known base 
ball men of the country; known from coast 
to coast; is a keen follower of the game and 
prominent in all its councils; nearly half a 
century ago was one of America's foremost 
players; knows the game thoroughly and 
writes from the point of view both of player 
and an official. 




HARRY PHILIP BURCHELL 1 

Sporting editor of the New York Times; 
University of Pennsylvania and Columbia 
University; editor of Spalding's Official Lawn 
Tennis Annual; is an authority on the game; 
follows the movements of the players minutely 
and understands not only tennis but all other 
subjects that can be classed as athletics; no 
one is better qualified to edit this book than 
Mr. Burchell. 



GEORGE T. HEPBRON 

Former Young Men's Christian Association 
director; for many years an official of the 
Athletic League of Young Men's Christian 
Associations of North America ; was con- 
nected with Dr. Luther H. Gulick in Young 
Men's Christian Association work for over 
twelve years; became identified with basket 
ball when it was in its infancy and has fol- 
lowed it since, being recognized as the lead- 
ing exponent of the official rules; succeeded 
Dr. Gulick as editor of the Official Basket Ball 

Guide and also editor of the Spalding Athletic Library book on How to 

Play Basket Ball. 





JAMES S. MITCHEL 

Former champion weight thrower; holder 
of numerous records, and is the winner of 
more championships than any other individual 
in the history of sport ; Mr. Mitchel is a close 
student of athletics and well qualified to write 
upon any topic connected with athletic sport ; 
has been for years on the staff of the New 
York Sun. 



EDITORS OF SPALDING 9 S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



MICHAEL C. MURPHY 

The world's most famous athletic trainer: 
the champion athletes that he has developed 
for track and field sports, foot ball and base ball 
fields, would run into thousands; he became 
famous when at Yale University and has 
been particularly successful in developing 
what might be termed championship teams 3 
his rare good judgment has placed him in an 
enviable position in the athletic world; now 
with the University of Pennsylvania; dur- 
ing his career has trained only at two col- 
leges and one athletic club, Yale and the 
University of Pennsylvania and Detroit Athletic Club; his most recent 
triumph was that of training the famous American team of athletes 
that swept the field at the Olympic Games of 1908 at London. 





DR, C. WARD CRAMPTON 

Succeeded Dr. Gulick as director of physical 
training in the schools of Greater New York: 
as secretary of the Public Schools Athletic 
League is at the head of the most remarkable 
organization of its kind in the world; is a 
practical athlete and gymnast himself, and 
has been for years connected with the physi- 
cal training system in the schools of Greater 
New York, having had charge of the High 
School of Commerce. 




DR. GEORGE J. FISHER 

Has been connected with Y. M. C. A. work 
for many years as physical director at Cincin- 
nati and Brooklyn, where he made such a high 
reputation as organizer that he was chosen to 
succeed Dr. Luther H. Gulick as Secretary of 
the Athletic League of Y. M. C. A.'s of North 
America, when the latter resigned to take 
charge of the physical training in the Public 
Schools of Greater New York. 



DR. GEORGE ORTON 

On athletics, college athletics, particularly 
track and field, foot ball, soccer foot ball, and 
training of the youth, it would be hard to find 
one better qualified than Dr. Orton; has had 
the necessary athletic experience and the 
ability to impart that experience intelligently 
to the youth of the land; for years was the 
American, British and Canadian champion 
runner. 



gDITORS OF SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 








FREDERICK R. TOOMBS 

A well known authority on skating-, rowing, 
boxing*, racquets, and other athletic sports; 
was sporting editor of American Press Asso- 
ciation, New York; dramatic editor; is a law* 
yer and has served several terms as a member 
of Assembly of the Legislature of the State of 
New York; has written several novels and 
historical works. 



R. L. WELCH 

A resident of Chicago; the popularity of 
indoor base ball is chiefly due to his efforts; 
a player himself of no mean ability; a first- 
class organizer; he has followed the game of 
indoor base ball from its inception. 



DR. HENRY S. ANDERSON 

Has been connected with Yale University 
for years and is a recognized authority on 
gymnastics; is admitted to be one of the lead- 
ing authorities in America on gymnastic sub- 
jects; is the author of many books on physical 
training. 



CHARLES M. DANIELS 

Just the man to write an authoritative- 
book on swimming; the fastest swimmer the 
world has ever known; member New York 
Athletic Club swimming team and an Olym- 
pic champion at Athens in 1906 and London, 
1908. In his book on Swimming, Champion 
Daniels describes just the methods one must 
use to become an expert swimmer. 

GUSTAVE BOJUS 

Mr. Bojus is most thoroughly qualified to 
write intelligently on all subjects pertaining 
to gymnastics and athletics; in his day one 
of America's most famous amateur athletes; 
has competed successfully in gymnastics and 
many other sports for the New York Turn 
Verein; for twenty years he has been prom- 
inent in teaching gymnastics and athletics; 
was responsible for the famous gymnastic 
championship teams of Columbia University 
DOW with the Jersey City high ichooli. 



EDITORS OF SPALDING' S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 








CHARLES JACOBUS 

Admitted to be the "Father of Roque;* 
one of America's most expert players, win- 
ning: the Olympic Championship at St. Louis 
in 1904; an ardent supporter of the game 
and follows it minutely, and much of the 
success of roque is due to his untiring; efforts; 
certainly there is no one better qualified to 
write on this subject than Mr. Jacobus. 



DR. E. B. WAR MAN 

Well known as a physical training: expert; 
was probably one of the first to enter the field 
and is the author of many books on the sub- 
ject; lectures extensively each year all ove* 
the country. 



W. J. CROMIE 

Now with the University of Pennsylvania; 
was formerly a Y. M. C. A. physical director: 
a keen student of all gymnastic matters; the 
author of many books on subjects pertaining 
to physical training. 



G. M. MARTIN 

By profession a physical director of the 
Young: Men's Christian Association; a close 
student of all things gymnastic, and games 
for the classes in the gymnasium or clubs. 



PROF. SENAC 

A leader in the fencing world ; has main- 
tained a fencing school in New York for 
years and developed a great many cham- 
pions; understands the science of fencing 
thoroughly and the benefits tm be derived 
therefrom. 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



a 



No 



Giving the Titles of all Spalding Athletic Library Books now 

j in print, grouped ior ready reference g — 

SPALDING OFFICIAL ANNUALS 



D 



Official Base Ball Guide 

Official Base Ball Record 

Official Collegiate Base Ball Annual 

Official Foot Ball Guide 

Official Soccer Foot Ball Guide 

Official Cricket Guide 

Official Lawn Tennis Annual 

Official Golf Guide 

Official Ice Hockey Guide 

Official Basket Ball Guide 

Official Women's Basket Ball Guide 

Official Lacrosse Guide 

Official Indoor Base Ball Guide 

Official Roller Polo Guide 

ng's Official Athletic Almanac 

ng's Official Athletic Rules 

Base Ball 

No.l Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide 
No. 1A Official Base Ball Record. 

Collegiate Base Ball Annual. 

How to Play Base Ball. 



Spald 
A Spald 
IC Spald 

2 Spald 
2A Spald 

3 Spald 
Spald 
Spald 
Spald 
Spald 
Spald 
Spald 
Spald 
Spald 
Spald 
Spald 



4 
5 
6 

7 

7A 

8 

9 
IO 
12 
I2A 



ng's 

ng's 

ng's 

ng's 

ng 

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ng 

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Croup 



No. 1C 
No. 202 
No. 223 
No. 232 
No. 230 
No. 229 
No. 225 
No. 226 
No. 227 
No. 228 
No. 224 



No. 
231. 



No. 219 
No. 350 



How to Ba.t. 

How to Run Bases. 

How to Pitch. 

How to Catch. 

How to Play First Base. 

How to Play Second Base. 

How to Play Third Base. 

How to Play Shortstop. 

How to Play the Outfield. 

How to Organize a Base Ball 

League. [Club. 

How to Organize a Base Ball 
How to Manage a Base Ball 

Club. 
How toTrain aBaseBallTeam 
How to Captain a Base Ball 
How to Umpire a Game. [Team 
Technical Base Ball Terms. 
Ready Reckoner of Base Ball 

Percentages. 
How to Score. 
BASE BALL AUXILIARIES 
No. 348 Minor League Base Ball Guide 
No. 352 Official Book National League 

of Prof. Base Ball Clubs. 
No. 340 Official Handbook National 

Playground Ball Assn. 

Group II. Foot Ball 

No.2 Spalding's Official Foot Ball Guide 
No. 344 A Digest of the Foot Ball Rules 

How to Play Foot Ball. 

Spalding's Official Soccer Foot 
Ball Guide. 

How to Play Soccer. 

How to Play Rugby. 



No. 324 ' 
No. 2a 



No. 286 
No. 335 



FOOT BALL AUXILIARIES 
No. 351 Official Rugby Foot Ball Guide. 
No. 332 Spalding's Official Canadian 

firoupm. FootBallGuide crkKct 

No. 3 Spalding's Official Cricket Guide. 
No. 277 Cricket and How to Play It. 

Group IV. Lawn Tennis 

No. 4 Spalding's Official Lawn Ten- 
nis Annual. 
No. 157 How to Play Lawn Tennis. 
No. 279 Strokes and Science of Lawn 

Group V. Tennis - Golf 

No. 5 Spalding's Official Golf Guide 
No. 276 How to Play Golf. 

Group VI. Hockey 

No. 6 Spalding's Official Ice Hockey 

Guide. 
No. 304 How to Play Ice Hockey. 
No. 154 Field Hockey. 

{Lawn Hockey. 
Parlor Hockey. 
Garden Hockey. 
No. 180 Ring Hockey. 

HOCKEY AUXILIARY 
No. 256 Official Handbook Ontario 
Hockey Association. 

Group vn. Basket Ball 

No. 7 Spalding's Official Basket 

Ball Guide. 
No. 7a Spalding's Official Women's 

Basket Ball Guide. 
No. 193 How to Play Basket Ball. 

BASKET BALL AUXILIARY 
No. 323 Official Collegiate Basket Ball 
Handbook. 



ANY OF THE ABOVE BOOKS MAILED POSTPAID UPON RECEIPT OF 10 CENTS 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



Group vill. 

Jtfo. 



Lacrosse 



8 Spalding's Official Lacrosse 
Guide. 
^No. 201 How to Play Lacrosse. 

indoor Base Ball 

No. 9 Spalding's Official Indoor Base 
Ball Guide. 

€roup 

No. 10 



Group IX. 



X. 



Polo 

Spalding's Official Roller Polo 
Guide. 
No. 129 Water Polo. 
No. 199 Equestrian Polo. 

Group XL Miscellaneous Gaines 



Archery. 

Croquet. 

Roque. 
(Racquets. 
< Squash-Racquets. 
( Court Tennis. 

Hand Ball. 

Quoits. 

Push Ball. 

Curling. 

Lawn Bowls. 

Lawn Games. 

Children's Games. 

How to Bowl. 



No. 248 
No. 138 
No. 271 

No. 194 

No. 13 
No. 167 
No. 170 
No. 14 
No. 207 
No. 188 
No. 189 
No. 341 

Group xu. Athletics 

No. 12 Spalding's Official Athletic 
Almanac. 

No. 12a Spalding's Official Athletic 
Rules. 

No. 27 College Athletics. 

No. 182 All Around Athletics. 

No. 156 Athletes' Guide. 

No. 87 Athletic Primer. 

No. 273 Olympic Game sat Athens, 1906 

No. 252 How to Sprint. 

No. 255 How to Run 100 Yards. 

No. 174 Distance and Cross Country 
Running. [Thrower. 

No. 259 How to Become a Weight 

No. 55 Official Sporting Rules. 

No. 246 Athletic Training for School- 
No. 317 Marathon Running. [boys. 

No. 331 Schoolyard Athletics, 

No. 342 Walking for Health and Com- 
petition. 
ATHLETIC AUXILIARIES 

No. 349 Intercollegiate Official Hand- 
book. 

No. 302 Y. M. C. A. Official Handbook. 

No. 313 Public Schools Athletic 
League Official Handbook. 

No. 314 Girls' Athletics. 

No. 308 Official Handbook New York 
• Inters cholastic Athletic 
Association. 



Group xili. 



Athletic 
Accomplishments 



No. 177 How to Swim. 

No. 296 Speed Swimming. 

No. 128 How to Row. 

No. 209 How to Become a Skater. 

No. 178 How to Train for Bicycling. 

No. 23 Canoeing. 

No. 282 Roller Skating Guide. 

Group XIV. Manly Sports 

No. 18 Fencing. ( By Breck.) 

No. 162 Boxing. 

No. 165 Fencing. ( By Senac.) 

No. 140 Wrestling. 

No. 236 How to Wrestle. 

No. 102 Ground Tumbling. 

No. 233 JiuJitsu. 

No. 166 How to Swing Indian Clubs, 

No. 200 Dumb Bell Exercises. 

No. 143 Indian Clubs and Dumb Bells. 

No. 262 Medicine Ball Exercises. 

No. 29 Pulley Weight Exercises. 

No. 191 How to Punch the Bag. 

No. 289 Tumbling for Amateurs. 

No. 326 Professional Wrestling. 

Group XV. Gymnastics 

No. 104 Grading of Gymnastic Exer- 
cises. [Dumb Bell Drills. 
No. 214 Graded Cali sthenics and 
No. 254 Barn j urn Bar Bell Drill. [Games 
No. 158 Indoor and Outdoor Gymnastic 
No. 124 How to Become a Gymnast. 
No. 287 Fancy Dumb Bell and March- 
ing Drills. [Apparatus. 
No. 327 Pyramid Building Without 
No. 328 Exercises on the Parallel Bars. 
No. 329 Pyramid Building with 
Wands, Chairs and Ladders 
GYMNASTIC AUXILIARY 
No. 345 Official Handbook I. C. A. A. 
Gymnasts of America. 

Group xvi. Physical culture 

No. 161 Ten Minutes' Exercise for 

Busy Men. [giene. 

No. 208 Physical Education and Hy- 

No. 149 Scientific Physical Training 

and Care of the Body. 
No. 142 Physical Training Simplified. 
No. 185 Hints on Health. 
No. 213 285 Health Answers. 
No. 238 Muscle Building. [ning. 

No. 234 School Tactics and Maze Run- 
No. 261 Tensing Exercises, [nasties. 
No. 285 Health by Muscular Gym- 
No. 288 Indigestion Treated by Gym- 
No. 290 Get Well: Keep Well, [nasties. 
No. 325 Twenty-Minute Exercises. 
No. 330 Physical Training for the 

School and Class Room. 
No. 346 How to Live 100 Years. 



ANY OF THE ABOVE BOOKS HAILED POSTPAID UPON RECEIPT OF 10 CENTS 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 




Group I. Base Ball 

No. 1— Spalding's Official 
Base Ball Guide. 

The leading Base Ball 
annual of the country, and 
the official authority of 
the game. Contains the 
official playing- rules, with 
an explanatory index of the 
rules compiled by Mr. A. G. 
Spalding - ; pictures of all 
the teams in the National, 
American and minor leagues ; re- 
views of the season; and a great deal of 
interesting information. Price 10 cents. 

No. 1A — Spalding's Official 
Base Ball Record. 

Contains records of all kinds from 
the beginning of the National League 
and official averages of all professional 
organizations for past season. Illus- 
trated with pictures of leading teams 
and players. Price 10 cents. 
No. 1C— Spalding's Official 
Collegiate Base Ball An- 
nual. 

Contains matters of interest exclu- 
sively for the college player ; pictures 
and records of all the leading colleges. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 202— How to Play Base 
Ball. 

Edited by Tim Murnane. New and 
revised edition. Illustrated with pic- 
tures showing how all the various 
curves and drops are thrown and por- 
traits of leading players. Price 10 cents. 
No. 223— How to Bat. 

There is no better way of becoming 
a proficient batter than by reading this 
book and practising the directions. 
Numerous illustrations. Price 10 cents. 
No. 232— How to Ran the 
Bases. 

This book gives clear and concise 
directions for excelling as a base run- 
ner; tells when to run and when not to 
do so; how and when to slide; team 
work on the bases; in fact, every point 
of the game is thoroughly explained. 
Illustrated. Price 10 cents. ^ 

No. 230— How to Pitch. 

A new, up-to-date book. Its contents 
are the practical teaching of men who 
have reached the top as pitchers, and 
who know how to impart a knowledge j 
of their art. All the big leagues' 
pitchers are shown. Price 10 cents. 



No. 229— How to Catch. 

Every boy who has hopes of being a 
clever catcher should read how well- 
known players cover their position. 
Pictures of all the noted catchers in 
the big leagues. Price 10 cents. 
No. 225— How to Play First 
Base. 

Illustrated with pictures of all the 
prominent first basemen. Price 10 cents. 
No. 226— How to Play Second 
Base. 

The ideas of the best second basemen 
have been incorporated in this book for 
the especial benefit of boys who want 
to know the fine points of play at this 
point of the diamond. Price 10 cents. 

No. 227— How to Play Third 
Base. 

Third base is, in some respects, the 
most important of the infield. All the 
points explained. Price 10 cents. 
No. 22S— How to Play Short- 
stop. 

Shortstop is one of the hardest posi- 
tions on the infield to fill, and quick 
thought and quick action are necessary 
for a player who expects to make good 
as a shortstop. Illus. Price 10 cents. 

No. 224— How to Play the 
Outfield. 

An invaluable guide for the out- 
fielder. Price 10 cents. 
No. 231— How to Coach; How 
to Captain a Team; How 
to Manage a Team; How 
to Umpire; Hour to Or- 
ganize a League; Tech- 
nical Terms of Base Ball. 
A useful guide. Price 10 cents. 
No 219— Ready Reckoner of 
Base Ball Percentages. 
To supply a demand for a book which 
would show the percentage of clubs 
without recourse' to the arduous work of 
figuring, the publishers had these tables 
compiled by an expert. Price 10 cents 
No. 350 — How to Score. 

A practical text book for scorers of 
base ball games, both amateur and 
expert. The most complete book of 
instruction on the art of scoring that 
has yet been published. An appendix 
includes answers to numerous problems 
which arise in scoring a game and is 
of great value in deciding what course 
to pursue when an intricate point in 
the rules arises. Compiled by J. M. 
Cummings. Price 10 cents. • 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



BASE BALL AUXILIARIES. 

No. 348— Minor League Base 

Ball Guide. 

The minors' own guide. Edited by 
President T. H. Murnane, of the New 
England League. Price 10 cents. 
No. 352— Official Handbook 

of the National League 

of Professional Base Ball 

Clubs. 
Contains the Constitution, By-Laws, 
Official Rules, Averages, and schedule 
of the National League for the current 
year, together with list of club officers 
and reports of the annual meetings of 
the League. Price 10 cents. 
No. 340— Official Handbook 

National Playground Ball 

Association. 
This game is specially adapted for 
playgrounds, parks, etc.; is spreading 
rapidly. The book contains a descrip- 
tion of the game, rules and list of 
officers. Price 10 cents. 

Group II. Foot Ball 

No. 2— Spalding's Official 
Foot Ball Guide 

Edited by Walter Camp. 

I Contains the new rules, 
with diagram of field; All- 
America teams as selected 
by the leading authorities; 
reviews of the game from 
various sections of the 
country; scores; pictures. 
Price 10 cents. 
No. 344— A Digest of tne 
Foot Ball Rules. 
This book is meant for the use of 
officials, to help them to refresh their 
memories before a game and to afford 
them a quick means of ascertaining a 
point during a game. It also gives a 
ready means of finding a rule in the 
Official Rule Book, and is of great help 
to a player in studying the Rules. 
Compiled by C. W. Short, Harvard, 1908. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 324— How to Play Foot 
Ball. 
Edited by Walter Camp, of Yale. 
Everything that a beginner wants to 
know and many points that an expert 
will be glad to learn. Snapshots of 
leading: teams and players in action, 
with comments by Walter Camp. 
Price 10 cents. 



Foot I 

Hi 
5 






No. 2A— Spalding's Official 
Association Soccer Foot 
'• Ball Guide. 

A complete and up-to- | 
date guide to the "Soccer" 
game in the United States. 
Contains instructions for 
playing the game, official 
rules, and interesting 
news from all parts of the 
country. Illustrated. Price | 
10 cents. 

No. 286— How to Play Soc- 
cer. 

How each position should be played, 
written by the best player in England 
in his respective position, and illus- 
trated with full-page photographs of 
players in action. Price 10 cents. 

No. 335— How to Play Rugby. 

Compiled in England by "Old Inter- 
national." Contains directions for 
playing the various positions, with dia- 
grams and illustrations. Price 10 cents.. 

FOOT BALL AUXILIARIES. 
No. 332— Spalding's Official 
Canadian Foot Ball 

Guide. 

The official book of the game in Can- 
ada. Price 10 cents. 

No. 351— Official Rugby Foot 
Ball Guide. 

The official handbook of the Rugby 
game, containing the official playing 
rules, referee's decisions, articles on 
the game in the United States and pic- 
tures of leading teams. Price 10 cents. 

Group III. Cricket 

No. 3— Spalding's Official 
Cricket Guide. 

The most complete year 
book of the game that has. 
ever been published in 
America. Reports of 
special matches, official 
rules and pictures of all 
the leading teams. Price 
10 cents. 

No. 277— Cricket; and How 
to Play it. 

By Prince Ranjitsinhji. The game 
described concisely and illustrated with 
full-page pictures posed especially for 
this book. Price 10 cents 




SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



Group IV. 



Lawn 
Tennis 




No. 4— Spalding's Official 
Lawn Tennis Annual. 

Contents include reports 
of all important tourna- 
ments; official ranking 
from 1885 to date; laws of 
lawn tennis; instructions 
for handicapping; deci- 
sions on doubtful points; 
management of tourna- 
I ments; directory of clubs; 
laying out and keeping a court. Illus- 
trated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 157 — How to Play Lawn 
Tennis. 

A complete description of lawn ten- 
nis; a lesson for beginners and direc- 
tions telling how to make the most im- 
portant strokes. Illustrated. Price 
10 cents. 

No. 279— -Strokes and Science 
of Lawn Tennis. 

By P. A. Vaile, a leading authority 
•on the game in Great Britain. Every 
stroke in the game is accurately illus- 
trated and analyzed by the author. 
Price 10 cents. 




Golf 



Official 




Group V. 

No. 5— Spalding's 
Golf Guide. 

Contains records of all 
important tournaments, 
articles on the game in 
various sections of the 
country, pictures of prom- 
inent players, official play- 
ing rules and general 
items of interest. Price 
10 cents. 



No. 276— How to Play Golf. 

By James Braid and Harry Vardon, 
the world's two greatest players tell 
how they play the game, with numer- 
ous full-page pictures of them taken 
•en the links. Price 10 cents. 



Group VI. Hockey 

No. 6— Spalding's Official Ice 
Hockey Guide. 

The official year book of 
the game. Contains the 
official rules, pictures of 
leading teams and players, 
records, review of the 
season, reports from dif- 
ferent sections of the 
United States and Canada, 
Price 10 cents. 
No. 304— How to Play Ice 
Hockey. 
Contains a description of the duties 
of each player. Illustrated. Price 10 
cents. 

\o. 154— Field Hockey. 

Prominent in the sports at Vassar, 
Smith, Wellesley, Bryn Mawr and other 
leading colleges. Price 10 cents. 

IV o. 1 cS 8 — L, a w n Hockey, 
Parlor Hockey, Garden 
Hockey. 

Containing the rules for each game. 
Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

No. ISO— Ring Hockey. 

A new game for the gymnasium. 
Exciting as basket ball. Price 10 cents. 

HOCKEY AUXILIARY. 

No. 25G— Official Handbook 
of the Ontario Hockey 
Association. 

Contains the official rules of the 
Association, constitution, rules of com- 
petition, list of officers, and pictures of 
leading players. Price 10 cents. 



Group VH. 



Basket 

Ball 



No. 7— Spalding's Official 
Basket Ball Guide. 

Edited by George T. 
Hepbron. Contains the 
revised official rules, de- 
cisions on disputed points, 
records of prominent 
teams, reports on the game 
from various parts of the 
country. Illustrated. Price | 
10 cents. 




SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



No* 7A— Spalding's Official 
Women's Basket Ball 
Guide. 

Edited by Miss Senda Berenson, of 
Smith College. Contains the official 
playing rules and special articles on 
the game by prominent authorities. 
Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 193— How to Play Basket 
Ball. 

By G. N. Messer. The best book of 
instruction on the game yet published. 
Illustrated with numerous pictures 
and diagrams of plays. Price 10 cents. 

BASKET BALL AUXILIARY. 
No. 323— Collegiate Basket 
Ball Handbook. 
The official publication of the Colle- 
giate Basket Ball Association. Con- 
tains the official rules, records, All- 
America selections, reviews, and pic- 
tures. Edited by H. A. Fisher, of 
Columbia. Price 10 cents. 

Group VIII. Lacrosse 

No. 8— Spaldingr's Official La- 
crosse Guide. 

Contains the constitution, by-laws, 
playing rules, list of officers and records 
of the U. S. Inter-Collegiate Lacrosse 
League. Price 10 cents. 

No. 201-How to Play La- 
crosse. 

Every position is thoroughly ex- 
plained in a most simple and concise 
manner, rendering it the best manual 
of the game ever published. Illus- 
trated with numerous snapshots of im- 
portant plays. Price 10 cents. 



Group IX. 



Indoor 
Base Ball 



No. 9— Spalding's Official In- 
door Base Ball Gnide. 

America's national game 
is now vieing with other 
indoor games as a winter 
pastime. This book con- 
tains the playing rules, 
pictures of leading teams, 
and interesting articles on 
the game by leading au- 
thorities on the subject. 
Price 10 cents. 




Polo 




Group X. 

No. 10— Spalding's 
Official Roller 
Polo Gnide. 

Edited by A. W. Keane. 
A full description of the 
game; official rules, re- 
cords; pictures of promi- 
nent players. Price 10 cents. 



No. 129— Water Polo. 

The contents of this book treat of 
every detail, the individual work of the 
players, the practice of the team, how 
to throw the ball, with illustrations and 
many valuable hints. Price 10 cents. 



No. 199— Equestrian Polo. 

Compiled by H. L. Fitzpatrick of the 
New York Sun. Illustrated with por- 
traits of leading players, and contains 
most useful information for polo play- 
ers. Price 10 cents. 



Group XL Misc ^ Uane - 
K ous Games 

No. 271— Spalding's Official 
Roque Gnide. 

The official publication . of the Na- 
tional Roque Association of America. 
Contains a description of the courts 
and their construction, diagrams, illus- 
trations, rules and valuable informa- 
tion. Price 10 cents. 



No. 13S— Spaldingr's Official 
Croquet Gnide 
Contains directions for playing, dia- 
grams of important strokes, description 
of grounds, instructions for the begin- 
ner, terms used in the game, and the 
official playing rules. Price 10 cents. 

No. 341— How to Bowl. 

The contents include: diagrams 6f 
effective deliveries; hints to beginner^; 
how to score; official rules; spares, 
how they are mdae; rules for cocked 
hat, quintet, cocked hat and feather, 
battle game, etc. Price 10 cents. 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



No. 24S— Archery. 

A new and up-to-date book on this 
fascinating pastime. The several 
varieties of archery; instructions for 
shooting; how to select implements; 
how to score; and a great deal of inter- 
esting information. Illustrated. Price 
10 cents. 

No. 194 — Racquets, Squash- 
Racquets and Court Ten- 
nis. 

How to play each game is thoroughly 
explained, and all the difficult strokes 
shown by special photographs taken 
especially for this book. Contains the 
official rules for each game. Price 10 
<;ents. 

No. 167— Quoits. 

Contains a description of the plays 
used by experts and the official rules. 
Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 170— Push Ball. 

This book contains the official rules 
and a sketch of the game; illustrated. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 13— How to Play Hand 
Ball. 

By the world's champion, Michael 
Egan. Every play is thoroughly ex- 
plained by text and diagram. Illus- 
trated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 14: — Curling. 

A short history of this famous Scot- 
tish pastime, with instructions for 
play, rules of the game, definitions of 
terms and diagrams of different shots. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 207— Bowling; on the 
Green; or, Lawn Bowls 

How to construct a green; how to 
play the game, and the official rules 
of the Scottish Bowling Association, 
Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 189— Children's Games. 

These games are intended for use at 
recesses, and all but the team games 
have been adapted to large classes. 
Suitable for children from three to 
eight years, and include a great variety. 
Price 10 cents. 




No. ISS-Lawn Games. 

Lawn Hockey, Garden Hockey, Hand 
Tennis, Tether Tennis; also Volley 
Ball, Parlor Hockey, Badminton, Bas- 
ket Goal. Price 10 cents. 

Group XII. Athletics 

No. 12— Spalding's Official 
Athletic Almanac. 

Compiled by J. E. Sulli- 
van, President of the Ama- 
teur Athletic Union. The 
only annual publication 
now issued that contains 
a complete list of amateur 
best-on-records; intercol- | 
legiate, swimming, inter- 
scholastic, English, Irish, Scotch, 
Swedish, Continental, South African, 
Australasian; numerous photos of in- 
dividual athletes and leading athletic 
teams. Price 10 cents. 

No. 12A— Spalding's Official 
Athletic Rules. 

The A. A. U. is the governing body 
of athletes in the United States of 
America, and all games must be held 
under its rules, which are exclusively 
published in this handbook, and a copy 
should be in the hands of every athlete 
and every club officer in America. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 27— College Athletics. 

M. C. Murphy, the well-known ath- 
letic trainer, now with Pennsylvania, 
the author of this book, has written it 
especially for the schoolboy and college 
man, but it is invaluable for the athlete 
who wishes to excel in any branch of 
athletic sport; profusely illustrated. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 1S2— Ail-Around Ath- 
letics. 

Gives in full the method of scoring 
the All- Around Championship; how to 
train for the All-Around Champion- 
ship. Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 150 — Athlete's Guide. 

Full instructions for the beginner, 
telling how to sprint, hurdle, jump and 
throw weights, general hints on train- 
ing; valuable advice to beginners and 
important A. A. U. rules and their ex- 
planations, while the pictures comprise 
many scenes of champions in action. 
Price 10 cents. 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



No. 273— The Olympic Games 
at Athens. 

A complete account of the Olympic 
Games of 1906, at Athens, the greatest 
International Athletic Contest ever 
held. Compiled by J. E. Sullivan, 
Special United States Commissioner to 
the Olympic Games. Price 10 cents. 

No. S7 — Athletic Primer. 

Edited by J. E. Sullivan, Secretary- 
Treasurer of the Amateur Athletic 
Union. Tells how to organize an ath- 
letic club, how to conduct an athletic 
meeting, and gives rules for the gov- 
ernment of athletic meetings; contents 
also include directions for laying out 
athletic grounds, and a very instructive 
article on training. Price 10 ce^its. 

No. 255— How to Run 100 
Yards. 

By J. W. Morton, the noted British 
champion. Many of Mr. Morton's 
methods of training are novel to 
American athletes, but his success is 
the best tribute to their worth. Illus- 
trated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 174 — Distance and Cross- 
Country Running 1 . 

By George Orton, the famous Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania runner. The 
quarter, half, mile, the longer dis- 
tances, and cross-country running and 
steeplechasing, with instructions for 
training; pictures of leading athletes 
in action, with comments by the editors 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 259— Weight Throwing. 

Probably no other man in the world 
has had the varied and long experience 
of James S. Mitchel, the author, in tlie 
weight throwing department of ath- 
letics. The book gives valuable infor- 
mation not only for the novice, but for 
the expert as well. Price 10 cents. 

No. 246— Athletic Training 

for Schoolboys. 
By Geo. W. Orton. Each event in the 
intercollegiate programme is treated 
of separately. Price 10 cents. 

No. 55— Official Sporting 
Rnles. ^ 

Contains rules not found in other 
publications for the government of 
many sports; rules for wrestling, 
shuffleboard, snowshoeing, profes- 
sional racing, pigeon shooting, dog 
racing, pistol and revolver shooting, 
British water polo rules, Rugby foot 
ball rules. Price 10 cents. 



Xo. 252— How to Sprint. 

Every athlete who aspires to be a 
sprinter can study this book to advan- 
tage. Price 10 cents. 

No. 331— Schoolyard Ath- 
letics. 

By J. E.Sullivan, Secretary-Treasurer 
Amateur Athletic Union and member 
of Board of Education of Greater New 
York. An invaluable handbook for 
the teacher and the pupil. Gives a 
systematic plan for conducting school 
athletic contests and instructs how to 
prepare for the various events. Illus- 
trated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 317— Marathon Running. 

A new and up-to-date book on this 
popular pastime. Contains pictures 
of the leading Marathon runners, 
methods of training, and best times 
made in various Marathon events. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 342— W alking; for 
Health and Competition. 

Contains a great deal of useful and 
interesting information for the pedes- 
trian, giving the best methods of walk- 
ing for recreation or competition, by 
leading authorities. A history of the 
famous Fresh Air Club of New York is 
also included, with specimen tours, 
rules for competitive walking, records 
and numerous illustrations. Price 10 
cents. 

ATHLETIC AUXILIARIES. 

Xo. 349— Official Intercolle- 
giate A.A.A.A. Handbook. 

Contains constitution, by-laws, and 
laws of athletics; records from 1876 to 
date. Price 10 cents. 

Xo. 30S— Official Handbook 
New York Interschol- 
astic Athletic Associa- 
tion. 

Contains the Association's records, 
constitution and by-laws and other 
information. Price 10 cents. 



Xo. 302— Official 
Handbook. 



v.M.C.A. 



Contains the official rules governing 
all sports under the jurisdiction of the 
Y. M. C. A., official Y. M. C. A. scoring 
tables, pentathlon rules, pictures of 
leading Y. M. C. A. athletes. Price 
10 cents. 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



No. 313— Official Handbook 
of the Public Schools 
Athletic League. 

Contains complete list of records, 
constitution and general review of the 
season in the Public Schools Athletic 
League of Greater New York. Illus- 
trated. Price 10 cents, 

\o. 314— "Girls' Athletics." 
Official Handbook of the 
Girls' Branch of the 
Public Schools Athletic 

League* 

The official publication. Contains : 
constitution and by-laws, list of offi- 
cers, donors, founders, life and annual 
members, reports and illustrations, 
schoolroom games. Edited by Miss 
Jessie H 8 Bancroft. Price 10 cents. 

Group Xin. Athletic 
Accomplishments 

No. 177— How to Swim. 

Will interest the expert as well as 
the novice; the illustrations were made 
from photographs especially posed, 
showing the swimmer in clear water; 
a valuable feature is the series of 
"land drill " exercises for the beginner. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 296 — Speed Swimming. 

By Champion C. M. Daniels of the 
New York Athletic Club team, holder 
of numerous American records, and the 
best swimmer in America qualified to 
write on the subject. Any boy should 
be able to increase his speed in the 
water after reading Champion Daniels' 
instructions on the subject. Price 10 
cents. r 

No. 128— How to Row. 

By E. J. Giannini, of the New York 
Athletic Club, one of America's most 
famous amateur oarsmen and cham- 
pions. Shows how to hold the oars, 
the finish of the stroke and other valu- 
able information. Price 10 cents. 

No. 23— Canoeing. 

Paddling, sailing, cruising and rac- 
ing canoes and their uses; with hints 
on rig and management; the choice of 
a canoe; sailing canoes, racing regula- 
tions; canoeing and camping. Fully 
illustrated. Price 10 cents. 



No. 209 — How to Become a 
Skater. 

Contains advice for beginners; how 
to become a figure skater, showing how 
to do all the different tricks of the best 
figure skaters. Pictures of prominent 
skaters and numerous diagrams. Price 
10 cents. 

No. 282— Official Roller Skat- 
ing Guide. 

Directions for becoming a fancy and 
trick roller skater, and rules for roller 
skating. Pictures of prominent trick 
skaters in action. Price 10 cents. 

No. 17S— How to Train for 
Bicycling. 

Gives methods of the best riders 
when training for long or short distance 
races; hints on training. Revised and 
up-to-date in every particular. Price 
10 cents. 



Group XIV. 



Manly 
Sports 



No. 140— Wrestling. 

Catch-as-catch-can style. Seventy- 
illustrations of the different holds, pho- 
tographed especially and so described 
that anybody can with little effort learn 
every one. Price 10 cents. 

No. IS — Fencing. 

By Dr. Edward Breck, of Boston,, 
editor of The Swordsman, a promi- 
nent amateur fencer. A book that has 
stood the test of time, and is universally 
acknowledged to be a standard work. 
Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 162— Boxing Gnide. 

Contains over 70 pages of illustrations 
showing all the latest blows, posed 
especially for this book under the super- 
vision of a well-known instructor of 
boxing, who makes a specialty of teach- 
ing and knows how to impart his 
knowledge. Price 10 cents. 

No. 165— The Art of Fencing 

By Regis and Louis Senac, of New 
York, famous instructors and leading 
authorities on the subject. Gives in 
detail how every move should be made. 
Price 10 cents. 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



No. 236— How to Wrestle. 

The most complete and up-to-date 
book on wrestling: ever published. 
Edited by F. R. Toombs, and devoted 
principally to special poses and illustra- 
tions by George Hackenschmidt, the 
" Russian Lion." Price 10 cents. 



No. 102— Ground Tumbling. 

Any boy, by reading; this book and 
following: the instructions, can become 
proficient. Price 10 cents. 



No. 289— Tumbling: for Ama- 
teurs. 

Specially compiled for amateurs by 
Dr. James T. Gwathmey. Every variety 
of the pastime explained by text and 
pictures, over 100 different positions 
being: shown. Price 10 cents. 



No. 191— How to Punch the 
Bag;. 

The best treatise on bag: punching: 
that has ever been printed. Every va- 
riety of blow used in training: is shown 
and explained, with a chapter on fancy 
bag: punching: by a well-known theatri- 
cal bag: puncher. Price 10 cents, 

No. 200— Dumb-Bells. 

The best work on dumb-bells that 
has ever been offered. By Prof. G. 
Bojus, of New York. Contains 200 
photographs. Should be in the hands 
of every teacher and pupil of physical 
culture, and is invaluable for home 
exercise. Price 10 cents. 



No. 143— Indian Clubs and 
Dumb-Bells. 

By America's amateur champion club 
swinger, J. H. Dougherty. It is clearly 
illustrated, by which any novice can 
become an expert. Price 10 cents. 



No. 262— Medicine Ball Ex- 
ercises. 

A series of plair *nd practical exer- 
cises with the medicine ball, suitable 
for boys and girls, business and profes- 
sional men, in and out of gymnasium. 
Price 10 cents. 



No. 29— Pulley Weigrht Exer- 
cises. 

By Dr. Henry S. Anderson, instructor 
in heavy gymnastics Yale gymnasium. 
In conjunction with a chest machine 
anyone with this book can become 
perfectly developed. Price 10 cents. 

No. 233— Jin Jitsu. 

Each move thoroughly explained and 
illustrated with numerous full-page 
pictures of Messrs. A. Minami and K. 
Koyama, two of the most famous ex- 
ponents of the art of Jiu Jitsu, who 
posed especially for this book. Price 
10 cents. 

No. 166— How to Swing; In- 
dian Clubs. 

By Prof. E. B. Warman. By follow- 
ing the directions carefully anyone can 
become an expert. Price 10 cents. 

No. 326— Professional Wrest- 
ling:. 

A book devoted to the catch-as-catch- 
can style; illustrated with half-tone 
pictures showing the different holds 
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By G. M. Martin. A book that should 
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No. 214— Graded Calisthen- 
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For years it has been the custom in 
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No. 124 — How to Become a 
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By W. J. Cromie. Illustrated with 
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SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 
Group II. No. 2 



SPALDING'S 

OfficialFootBallGuidi 



1911 



FOOT BALL RULES 

AS RECOMMENDED BY THE RULES COMMITTEE 

Consisting of 

E. K. HALL, Dartmouth, Chairman 

WALTER CAMP, Yale, Secretary 

JAMES A. BABBITT, Haverford 

CARL F. WILLIAMS, University of Pennsylvania 

PERCY HAUGHTON, Harvard 

F. D. BERRIEN, Annapolis 

W. L. DUDLEY, Vanderbilt 

PARKE H. DAVIS, Princeton 

V. M. COOPER, West Point 

C. W. SAVAGE, Oberlin 

S. C. WILLIAMS, University of Iowa 

A. A. STAGG, University of Chicago 

H. L. WILLIAMS, University of Minnesota 

JOSEPH BEACHAM, Cornell 

J* 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 
EDITED BY WALTER CAMP 



For publication by the 

AMERICAN SPORTS PUBLISHING COMPANY 
21 Warren Street, New York 



Copyright, 1911 

BY 

American Sports Publishing Company 
New York 



Contents 



PAGE 

All- America Foot Ball Team 5 

Other All- America Selections 21 

Some Representative Teams and Their Work in 1910 43 

Games Since Introduction of Rugby Foot Ball. . ." 49 

Review of the Western Conference Season of 1910 57 

Foot Ball in the Middle States . ; 69 

South Atlantic Foot Ball , 73 

Diagram of Field of Play , 78 

Official Playing Rules 79 

Notes v 139 

Illustrations 143 

Index .". 150 

Captains, Coaches and Managers of College Teams 159 

Officials' List American Intercollegiate Foot Ball Rules Committee, 1911. ... . 166 

Foot Ball in New England 179 

Foot Ball in Western Pennsylvania 183 

Review of 1910 Foot Ball Season in Ohio M 189 

All-Ohio Conference Eleven for 1910 ^ 197 

Foot Ball in Ohio . v i^ 201 

Middle States Scholastic Foot Ball '. . . V#205- 

Scholastic Foot Ball of Greater Boston 207 

Foot Ball by the Teams of the U. S. S. Idaho and U. S. S. Vermont i 213- 

U. S. S. Connecticut Defeats U. S. S. Michigan. .\Jy-' 217 

College Notes '. ,'.. . ■ j f 219 

Records of Teams v 247 

Schedules for 1911 268 

What a Foot Ball Player Should Wear .&. 27& 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



All-America Foot Ball Team 

A REVIEW OF THE SEASON'S PLAY AND THE PLAYERS 



WALTER CAMP 



(From Collier's Weekly. Copyright, 1910, by P. F. Collier & Son.) 



First Eleven. 
End— Kilpatrick, Yale. 
Tackle— Walker, Minnesota. 
Guard— Benbrook, Michigan. 
Center — Cozens, Penn. 
Guard — Fisher, Harvard. 
Tackle— McKay, Harvard. 
End — Wells, Michigan. 
Quarter — Sprackling, Brown. 
Half— Wendell, Harvard. 
Half— Pendleton, Princeton. 
Full — Mercer, Penn. 

A strange season 
indeed and one of weird 
happenings. But in 
spite of all this, the 
play was consistently 
interesting, and brought 
out at times some very 
good quality of work, 
both in individual 
prowess and in team 
tactics. Best of all, 
the pounding upon 
tackle, which had been 
the most serious fea- 
ture of the season of 
1909, was practically 
eliminated by the new 
rule forbidding pushing 
ard pulling and locked 
interference. This gave 
the man playing this 
former star position a 
chance once more to 
bring out the infinite 
possibilities of the 
place instead of merely 
standing up to be 
pounded to a jelly or 
made a chopping-block 
cf. I regard this as, 



Second Eleven. 
L. Smith, Harvard. 
Scully, Yale. 
Weir, West Point. 
Morris, Yale. 
Brown, Annapolis. 
Smith, Brown. 
Daley, Dartmouth. 
Howe, Yale. 
Dalton, Annapolis. 
Field, Yale. 
McKay, Brown. 




Kilpatrick (Yale) 
End 



Third Eleven. 
Eyrich, Cornell. 
Grimm, Washington. 
Metzger, Vanderbilt. 
Sisson, Brown. 
Butzer, Illinois. 
Shonks, Nebraska. 
Dean, Wisconsin. 
McGovern, Minnesota. 
Taylor, Oregon. 
Ramsdell, Pennsylvania. 
Corbett, Harvard. 

by all odds, the best 
feature introduced into 
the rules, and I believe 
that all those who care 
for the eventual wel- 
fare of the sport will 
agree on this point. 
The difficulty surround- 
ing it was that the 
officials,' urged ( I have it 
from the board of offi- 
cials) by coaches not to 
rule too harshly on this 
point, allowed a certain 
amount of pushing and 
pulling and holding to 
creep into the play, and 
hence gave an undue 
and unusual induce- 
ment to the infringe- 
ment of the rules. This 
brought about an 
anomaly in that the 
officials who were sup- 
posed to enforce the 
rules found every 
pressure exerted upon 
them to overlook occa- 
sional lapses. Such a 
state of affairs is the 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 




worst possible thing for any sport, because if the 

rules are not made to be enforced the rules must 

be wrong, and if officials find that they are not 

backed up in strict rulings their authority will 

speedily cease and the game revert to a lower 

standard. 

Not only have these new rules eliminating push- 
ing and pulling been thoroughly successful whenever 

enforced, and reduced to the minimum the heavy 

assaults upon the tackles witnessed in 1909. thus 

going far toward lessening the danger of accident, 

but they have saved the rest of the team from 

that stupid, dazed condition that arose from this 

style of play. At the same time these rules have 

rendered the game far more a square sport in the 

sense that no one man was made a mark for the 

united assault of some five men massed and going 

with such a cruel force as to make the play a 

really unfair equation. This feature of the rules 

Should be preserved at all hazards, as well as the 

kindred one forbidding locked interference. Upon 

these rules depends the real salvation of the game 

from the two great objections of unfair and brutal 

play. Something more should be done, however, to J 

render the task of officials less onerous and the * 

comprehension of the average spectator more 

effective. 

It is rather a strange commentary upon the use Walker (Minnesota) 

of the forward pass that Yale and Michigan should Tackle 

each have won one of their most important contests 

of the year by means of this play, just as Yale won 

her main contest with one of these plays in the 
initial year of its introduction, while others, 
though using this play more frequently, usually 
lost rather than gained through its employment, 
just as did Harvard in her chief contest in 1909. 
The play is a treacherous one, and the occasions 
for its use are so dependent upon the very imme- 
diate conditicns surrounding it at the moment 
that it should be placed in a special category by 
I every quarter-back and captain. Chicago, probably 
' its stror gest advocate, has fared very badly this 
season, although this may be traceable to lack of 
material. Pennsylvania, another of those who 
were credited with especially desiring its reten- 
tion, has perfected a far more effective play 
against her opponents in the shape of a running- 
on-side kick. And Pennsylvania should have 
especial credit for this achievement in view o + the 
fact that it takes harder and more conscientious 
work to perfect this play. The reward, however, 
is correspondingly greater because the really 
effective on-side kick when not recovered still has 
very nearly as good results as an ordinary kick, 
while a forward pass when it fails may result in 
changing the entire complexion of the play in a 
moment. A study of generalship proves that 
neither play may be used against an alert defense 
except under special conditions of wind and posi- 

Benbrook (Michigan) tion. In fact, the best knowledge that a foot 
Guard ball general may acquire is to know when not to 




•PALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



9 



the! ft 




Cozens (U. of P.) 
Center 



use either of these plays. Harvard, Yale and 

Princeton furnished most interesting complica- 
tions. Harvard, with a wealth of material and 

a wonderful aggregation of veterans who had 

been star ground-gainers the year before, started 

her season at once with consistent play on 

attack and defense, running through her teams 

up to the time of the Brown game with at least 

three scores over each, and in the Brown game 

winning 12 to ; the Army game was a little 

harder, but Harvard won it 6 to 0. 

On the following Saturday Harvard met 

Cornell (the first team to score on the Cam- 
bridge men), and defeated her 27 to 5. Then 

Dartmouth was decisively defeated, no less than 

18 .to 0. By the 11th of November Yale had 

been defeated by the Army, tied by Vanderbilt, 

and almost annihilated, 21 to 0, by Brown, 

while Princeton's slate was clean. 

Princeton had been a very consistent team, 

defeating her opponents up to the Lafayette 

game very easily. She found more difficulty, 

here, but still won. Then she defeated the 

Indians 6 to 0, and faced a hard game wit 

Dartmouth. This she also won 6 to 0. The \ 

following Saturday Princeton took somewhat of I 

a breathing spell, but defeated Holy Cross 17 

to 0. Hence there was every expectation that 

Princeton would at last secure the longed-for 

victory over the Blue. 

But the Brown game proved the final stagger- 
ing blow that convinced Yale that she must abandon 
old lire-plunging methods. During the week that 
followed no team in the history of the game ever 
absorbed so much foot ball knowledge. But those 
outside New Haven and most of the people there, 
for the practice was secret, knew nothing of this 
except through rumor and the more cheerful expres- 
sions of players and coaches. 

From the very start in the Princeton game Yale 
seemed to have the upper hand, and, although stalled 
several times, finally won by the execution of a 
clever forward pass," the score being 5 to 3. Then 
without a break in her stride the Blue went on with 
the hardest kind of practice throughout the week, 
while the Harvard sympathizers, becoming somewhat 
alarmed at the result, endeavored to comfort them- 
selves by reading the statements in the papers that 
it was not Yale's strength, but Princeton's weakness, 
and that neither team played up-to-date foot ball. 
But those who knew at Cambridge were not deceived 
by this ; they realized that Yale had a strong team, 
and a team that was coming ; a team that was no 
longer hammering itself to pieces with old-fashioned 
line-plunging methods and whose defense was entirely 
reorgauized and reformed. 

As it proved, they had stored up within them a 
potential force to stop anything that Harvard pro- 
duced, and at the end of an hour and forty minutes 
Fisher (Harvaiu) the two "teams left the field, neither having been able 
Guard to score. It is doubtful if any aggregation of players, 



COPYRIGHT BY FALK. 




•SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



11 




even from Yale, ever before took up such odds as 
stood against them and succeeded as this teain did 
in reversing them. Thus ended for -these three , teams, 
Princeton, Harvard and Yale, one oft the most compli- 
cated and puzzling of seasons. 

Pennsylvania. Michigan and Cornell: were., however, 
not far behind in contributions to the gridiron crazy- 
-quilt. Pennsylvania was defeated by" Tfr sinus, and 
Michigan was tied by both Case and Ohio State, 
while Cornell was/tied by Oberlin. > But Pennsylvania 
defeated Brown 20 to 0; Cornell was the only team 
to cross Harvard's goal line, and Michigan, besides 
tieing Pennsylvania, defeated Minnesota. Then Penn- 
sylvania defeated Cornell by the score of 12 to 6. 

The Dartmouth-Brown situation, although they do 
not meet, is unquestionably the most interesting in 
New England. Brown defeated Yale 21 to 0, although 
defeated earlier in the season by Pennsylvania. Dart- 
mouth took on the Princeton and Harvard teams 
when each was at the very top of its game, and 
suffered defeat in both instances. A match between 
these two, Brown and Dartmouth, renewing old rela- 
tions, would have proved particularly interesting. 
Amherst and Williams just about bore out the 
promise indicated by their matches with Dartmouth, 
for the first-named was defeated by Dartmouth 15 to 

3, while F U J la ??* ! U 5T d + f^V ' T n U f' n S WaS M cKay (Harvard) 

anticipated, Amherst defeated W llhams 9 to 0. Tackle 

In the Middle West Minnesota came from the very 

start with a great rush. The shift plays of Dr. 

Williams, former Yale back, later used at New Haven, 

proved too much for Minnesota's opponents up to 
the time of the great game. In fact, it is prob- 
able that the early promise of the team, coupled 
with the unexpected weakness of the opponents on 
its schedule, cost Minnesota her important match 
with Michigan, for her team had never before 
been even headed. When Michigan checked her it 
was too new an experience, and Yost's men won 
with the forward passes at the end. Outside of 
Michigan and Minnesota. Illinois should have the 
credit for developing an exceedingly good team. 
Chicago dropped still further down, as must any 
team that has through lack of material no back- 
bone of attack outside the forward passes and tricks. 
West Point and Annapolis did conscientious, 
hard work and developed, as usual, two strong 
teams. The latter's schedule was the lighter — 
almost too light for real testing — but kept the 
men in good physical trim. In fact, at the time 
of meeting, no one had a satisfactory line on their 
relative merits, and it was anybody's choice. The 
game was played slowly and in a howling gale, 
and Annapolis won through better generalship 
and the work of Dalton. who kicked a goal from 
\ olacement, the single solitary score of the day. 
/Carlisle was more erratic than usual, hut wound 
/ up its season in a hard game with Brown, which 
was interesting, but Brown proved too strong. 
Wells (Michigan) Taking up the individual qualifications of those 

End who make up the All-America Team bi 1910: 




SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUI PI' 



13 




Sprr.ck'ing (Brown) 
Q uar ter-bacl: 



Beginning with the ends, it seems hardly wort a 
while to take up a great deal of space with a 
description of the work of Kilpatriek of Yale, for 
he was the same not only reliable but brijiant 
player as when he filled the position in 1909. 
But there is another man who runs him close on 
account of the great value he was to his team. 
practically alone and unaided winning for that 
team its principal championship game. That man 
is Wells of Michigan. Not only has he all the 
qualifications of the ordinary first-class end, bur 
he is a sterling back as well. 

Next to these two comes L. Smith of Harvard. 
a reliable, heady player, powerful and aler.. 
although not exceptionally fast. Although not 
scintillating as Kilpatriek, he could always be 
counted upon. 

Of tackles, McKay of Harvard earned for him- 
self the reputation of the best man in a remark- 
ably good line. 

Walker of Minnesota was the star man in the 
Gopher line ; breaking through, blocking kicks. 
handling his men on offense, and always alert and 
keen on defense, he was a dangerous feature to 
Minnesota's opponents. ( 

Scully of Yale came late in t.:e season, but he ' 
came far, and for a man of his build combined 
speed and aggressiveness in a marked fashion. 

Of guards we have a wonderful pair. Benbrook 
is a ^born player. In 1909 he showed great 
strength and cash and an ability to follow the 

ball ; in 1910 he improved along every line, and 
there is no match for him on the gridiron. 

Fisher of Harvard is next to Benbrook and 
outclassed the other competitors for this position. 
He and Benbrook as a pair would bolster up 
almost any center. After these two first string 
guards there are three men. On his season's 
work I should take Brown of the Navy, with 
Weir of the Army and Butzer of Illinois to follow. 
Coming to the pivotal position of center, Cozens 
of Pennsylvania gets the call from Morris of Y/ale 
i because he has played in top form from the very 
r start of the season, and was a shade the more 
1 consistent passer, making almost no slips. The 
defensive work of both outshone that of any other 
middle men throughout the season, Cozens was 
quick to diagnose the play, and able to direct hi? 
guards so that the three men and his back-field 
defense worked in unison : there were few plays 
that, given a little time, he would not rind a 
means to stop. Morris used similar methods. 
The quarter-back position was more closely con- 
i tested last year than ever before in the history 
of the gridiron sport. Howe, Sprackling and 
McGovern — no captain would be dissatisfied with 
any of the three. Sprackling, however, gets the 
olace because he has played it all through the 
season at top form. I doubt very much, however, if 
Wendell (Harvard) any one who saw Howe handle his team in only the 
Half-back tv\o main contests when he came back to his 1909 





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SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 15 

position of quarter-back, and watched his consum- 
mate generalship in those games, and finally saw 
him kick out from the shadows of his own goal 
post into the teeth of the wind, not upon one occa- 
sion, but upon several, would fail to accord him the 
right to step up from second place, which he occu- 
pied last year, into the premier position. McGovern, 
presumably the strong drop-kicker, missed his oppor- 
tunity in his big contest, so that perhaps Sprackling 
has a shade on him here. It is not that McGovern 
has become poorer than in 1909 in any respect, 
except possibly in speed of kick, for Michigan partly 
blocked his try of drop-kick ; it is that both Sprack- * 
ling and Howe (placed below him last year) have 
come up and shown such qualities as to entitle 
them to higher consideration. 

Of backs, Wendell of Harvard, Pendleton of 
Princton and Mercer of Pennsylvania make an ideal 
back-field. Wendell is the best line-plunger on the 
gridiron, and carries his charge farther through 
and exhibits a greater ability to keep his feet than 
any one else who has tried this play. Pendleton 
and Mercer are fast ; Pendleton a bright star when 
given the proper kind of protection and interference. 
He fared badly in his game with Yale because 
Princeton was met with an unusual defense which \ 
the rest of her men did not understand how to ,, - „- . 

handle. Mercer has a shade the Mercer (U. of P.), 
best of any of them as a defen- Full-back 

sive back, and thus fills up the 
measure. Field of Yale was, however, the best 
defensive back on the gridiron of 1910. McKay of 
Brown was a hard hitter, who took a lot of 
stopping and was a good punter as well. Corbett 
of Harvard was not quite up to his former stand- 
ard in his last game, but was the star of all 
games previous to this, and was constantly 
watched by the Yale defense. Dal ton of the 
Navy was the mainstay of his team when hard 
work was wanted, both on running and kicking. 
Taylor, the Oregon captain, was a shining light, 
fast and strong and good on defense. Magidsohn 
of Michigan, Johnson and Rosenwald of Minnesota 
were hard-running, experienced men, but Magid- 
sohn could not make his usual headway over Min- 
nesota's line, and, had it not been for Wells, 
Michigan would have failed of its victory. Kistler 
of Yale proved a strong line-plunger. E. Rams- 
dell of Trinity should be considered, although an 
injured side somewhat handicapped this really 
star player. Daly of Yale got in the longest run 
of the day in the Harvard game, and only missed 
by a shade the prettiest drop kicks of the season 
in the Princeton and Harvard games, the ball 
Pendleton (Princeton) hitting the goal post in the former and being 
Half-back swerved by the wind in the latter. 




SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 17 

ADDITIONAL. NOTES ON TEAMS AND PLAYERS. 

The only section of the country where the American Intercol- 
legiate game does not hold full sway in the fall is on the Pacinc 
Coast, and there is a break, two of the universities, Stanford ana 
California, having given up the game some three years ago, and 
adopted Rugby in its place. At first Rugby was unsatisfactory to 
the student body, players, and spectators, but with three years of 
it they have grown to like it, and it is serving its purpose, and it 
is a good game. It lacks the definiteness and planning of the Amer- 
ican Intercollegiate, and there is a far greater measure of luck and 
chance, with more individualism and less team play, but it is fine 
exercise. Outside of these two the universities are playing the 
American game, and there is remarkably wide-spread interest in it. 
Especially is this true in the Northwest, where some of the best 
players and best teams are located. 

It may also be said of the South that her style of play was 
benefited much under last year's rules. There is far more elasticity 
in her game, and the fact that •Vanderbilt is able to come North and 
play Yale to a tie shows good quality. 

Of ends, Daley of Dartmouth was another star in the position, and 
a good one, too with Eyrich of Cornell, Dean of Wisconsin, Gilchrist 
of the Navy and Asbaugh of Brown all pressing for place. Had 
Brooks of Yale played through the season as he did in his last 
two games he would have surely been placed. 

Of the tackles, Smith of Brown was in every play on defense, and 
had plenty of strength and good speed, with excellent judgment. 
"Polly" Grimm of Washington is a big, powerful man, over twt. 
hundred pounds, whose wrestling experience has made him quick as 
a cat, and who has a good head. 

Shonks of Nebraska is a tackle of good class, and in the latter 
part of the Minnesota game, when he had partially diagnosed the 
offensive shift, did some excellent stopping. McGregor of Princeton 
and Buser of Wisconsin deserve mention for sterling work in their 
important games. Rodgers of Pennsylvania saved his end, who was 
overrunning his man on kicks, by getting down and picking the man 
every time. Withington of Harvard and Paul of Yale showed excep- 
tional class in a position full of good men. In the South, Freeland 
of Vanderbilt, Falkenberry of Sewanee, and Patterson of Georgia 
Technical put up a good game, while in the Northwest Eakins of 
Washington added to his ability as a tackle some splendid punting. 
Laird of Washington State also did well. 

Scully of Yale was down under kicks with his ends, deadly in 
his tackling, and with great natural ability to diagnose plays. Could 
Lhe have had another two weeks of it he would have pushed the 
leaders closely indeed. 

When Benbrook of Michigan was placed on the All-America last 
year as the first choice of guards, there were some who questioned 
how he would compare with the best of the East. There is no doubt 
now in any one's mind who had a chance to see him play this year 
and make such a comparison. Repeatedly in his Michigan game he 
would come crashing over and meet Johnson on plays outside tackle 
when it seemed as if the Minnesota back was surely free. 

Of guards, Metzger of Vanderbilt was one of the best men 
©n his team. Minot of Harvard changed from back to line and did 
very creditable work there, as did Messick of Indiana, Fuller and 
McDevitt of Yale late in the season. Of Southern guards outside of 
Metzger the choice was Kinnebrew of Mississippi, Franklin of Georgia, 
and Bomer of Auburn. They played the position as did Congdon of 
Yale some three years ago, dropping back from the line while in 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 19 

mid-field and giving the opponents plenty of enticing opportunities 
to come into the middle ; then, as soon as the play commenced to 
approach the thirty-yard line, coming up closer ; or, if the plays 
through the line were getting too strong, tightening up ; and each 
was successful with this method. 

In the center position, after Cozens and Morris, there are two 
men, either of whom would be the proper keystone to the center arch. 
These men are Pinkett of Amherst and Sisson of Brown. Pinkett 
of Amherst was something of a reincarnation of W. H. Lewis, the 
old Amherst center and later the Harvard star. His passing: and 
defensive work were capital. Galvin of Pittsburg was unquestionably 
closely on a par with these two. Juhan of Sewanee was the best man 
in his section, with Caton of Auburn a good second. 

Ir.gersoll of Dartmouth, though in the fastest kind of company 
and physically not at his best, was always a dangerous factor to 
his opponents. MacMillan, the Michigan quarter, a fine little general, 
has not quite the physique of Cozens and Morris. Butler of Cornell 
did some very pretty kicking, his placement goals accounting for both 
the Ithacans' scores against Pennsylvania and the second being from 
the 45-yard-line. Coyle of Washington and Latourette of Oregon 
were also good clever performers. 

Seiler of Illinois and Lawton of Michigan were star kickers. 
Macomber of Rolla School of Mines in the Southwest was good, while 
in the Northwest Thornton of Idaho, Keck of Oregon Agricultural, 
and Hawley, captain of the same team, were well worth consideration. 

Nor should Morrison of Vanderbilt be without great consideration. 
His handling of Gillem's long spirals was splendid, as was his 
running. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



21 



Other A Ih America Selections 



jS m rfurton S. Broivn in 
New York Globe. 

Ends. . Kilpatrick,Yaie: L. Smith. Har. 

Tackles -McKay, Har. ; Withington, Har. 

Guards Benbrook; Mich.; Wilson, Prin. 

Center Cozens, Pennsylvania. 

Quarter-back.. .Sprackling, Brown. 

Half-backs Magids'hn,Mich.; Wendell,Har. 

Full-back Mercer, Pennsylvania. 

New York Morning Telegraph. 

Ends Kilpatrick, Yale; Smith, Har. 

Tackles Scully, Yale; McKay, Harvard. 

Guards. Benbrook, Mich, ; Fisher, Kar, 

Center Cozens, Pennsylvania. 

Quarter-back... S&rackliag, Brown. [Har. 

Half-backs Magidsohn, Michigan; Wendell, 

Full-back Mercer, Pennsylvania. 

Philadelphia Times. 

Ends Kilpatrick, Yale; Smith, Har. 

Tackles McKay, Har. ; Withington, Har. 

Guards Benbrook, Mich.; Fisher, Har. 

Center Cozens, Pennsylvania. 

Quarter-back.. .Sprackling, Brown. [Mich. 

Half-backs Wendell, Harvard; Magidsohn, 

Full-back Mercer, Pennsylvania. 

By Andrew Latham Smith in 
Philadelphia Bulletin. 

Ends Kilpatrick, Y.; Piolett, State. 

Tackles McKay, Har.; Brown, Navy. 

Guards Benbrook, Mich.: Fisher, Har. 

Center Cozens, Pennsylvania. 

Quarter-back... Sprackling, Brown. [Mich. 

Half-backs Wendell, Harvard; Magidsohn, 

Full-back Mercer, Pennsylvania. 

Pittsburg Dispatch. 

Ends Kilpatrick, Yale; Smith, Har. 

Tackles .Scully, Yale; McKay, Harvard. 

Guards Benbrook, Mich.; Fisher, Har. 

Center Galvin, Pittburg. 

Quarter-back . . Sprackling, Brown. [Har. 

Half-backs Magidsohn, Michigan; Wendell, 

Full-back Richards, Pittsburg. 

Washington Times. 

Ends Kilpatrick, Yale; Brooks, Yale. 

Tackles Withington, Har. ; McKay, Har. 

Guards Benbrook, Mich, Fisher, Har. 

Center Cozens, Pennsylvania. 

Quarter-back. . . Sprackling, Brown. [Prin. 

Half-backs Magidsohn, Mich.; Pendleton, 

Full-back Wendell, Harvard. 



New York Evening Telegram. 
Kilpa^r^k Yale; Smith, Kar. 
Scully, Yale; McKay, Harvard. 
Benbrook, Mich.; Fisher, Har. 
Cozens, Pennsylvania. 
Sprackling, Brown. 
McKay, Brown; Wendell, Har. 
Mercer, Pensylvania. 

The Christian Science Monitor* 
Kilpatrick, Yale; Smith, Har. 
McKay, Har. Withington, Har. 
Benbrook, Mich.; Fisher, Har. 
Arnold, West Point. 
Sprackling, Brown. 
McKay, Brown; Wendell, Har. 
Hart, Princeton. 

Philadelphia Inquirer. 
Kilpatrick, Y. ; Shwenk, Laf ay. 
Withington, Har.; Hart, Prin. 
Minot, Har. ; Benbrook, Mich. 
Cozens, Pennsylvania. 
Howe, Yale. 

Wendell, Har.; Pendleton, Prin. 
Butler, Cornell. 

Philadelphia Evening Telegraph 
Kilpatrick, Yale; Marks, Penn. 
McKay, Har.; Withington, Har. 
Benbrook, Mich.; Fisher, Har. 
Cozens, Pennsylvania. 
Howe, Yale. 

Wendell, Har. ; Pendleton, Prin. 
Mercer, Pennsylvania. 

Pittsburg Leader. 
Kilpatrick, Yale; Daly, Dart. 
Scully, Yale: Withington. Har. 
Benbrook,Mich.; Brown,Navy. 
Galvin, Pittsburg. 
Sprackling, Brown. [Prin. 

Magidsohn, Mich.; Pendleton, 
Mercer, Pennsylvania. 

Ths Pennsylvanian, 
Kilpatrick, Yale; Piollet, Stata. 
Scully, Yale; McKay, Harvard. 
Benbrook, Mich.; Fisher, Har. 
Cozens, Pennsylvania. 
Sprackling, Brown. [Mich. 

Wendell, Harvard; Magidsohn. 
Mercer, Pennsylvania. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



23 



Cincinnati Post. 

Ends Kilpatrick, Yale; Wells, Mich. 

Tackles Withington, Har . ; McKay, Har. 

Guards Benbrook, Mich.; Fisher, Har. 

Center Cozens, Pennsylvania. 

Quarter-back... Sprackling, Brown. [Prin. 

Half-backs Magidsohn, Mich. ; [ Pendleton, 

Full-back Wended, Harvard. 

Boston Record. 

Ends Kilpatrick, Yale; Smith, Har. 

Tackles Devore.Army; Withe rspoon.H. 

Guards Fisher, Har.; Benbrook, Mich. 

Center Morris, Yale. 

Quarter-back... Sprackling, Brown 

Half-backs Wendell, Har. ; Ramsdell, Penn. 

Full-back Pendleton, Princeton. 

Providence Tribune. 

Ends Kilpatrick, Yale; Lewis, Har. 

Tackles McKay, Har. ; Smith, Brown. 

Guards Benbrook, Mich. ; Fisher, Har. 

Center Sisson, Brown. 

Quarter-back.. .Sprackling, Brown. 

Half-backs Wendell, Har.; McKay, Brown. 

Full-back Ramsdell, Pennsylvania. 



Boston Post, 
Kilpatrick, Yale; Marks, Penn. 
Scully, Yale; McKay, Harvard. 
Benbrook, Mich.; Fisher, Har. 
Arnold, West Point. 
Sprackling-, Brown. 
Howe, Yale; Corbett, Harvard. 
McKay, Brown. 

Boston Traveller. 
Kilpatrick, Yale; Smith, Har. 
Withington, Har.; McKay, Har. 
Benbrook, Mich.; Fisher, Har. 
Arnold, West Point. 
Sprackling-, Brown. 
Howe, Yale; Pendleton, Prin. 
Mercer, Pennsylvania. 

Providence Journal. 
Kilpatrick, Yale; Smith, Har. 
Withington, Har.; Smith, Brown 
Benbrook, Mich.; Fisher, Har. 
Sisson, Brown. 
Sprackling, Brown. 
Ramsdell, Penn.; McKay, Brown 
Wendell, Harvard. 



ALL-EASTERN SELECTIONS 



New York Herald. 

Ends Kilpatrick, Yale; Smith, Har. 

Tackles Scully, Yale; Withington, Har. 

Guards Fisher, Harvard; Brown, Navy. 

Center Cozens, Pennsylvania. 

Quarter-back... Sprackling, Brown. 

Half-backs Pendleton, Prin.; Mercer,U.Pa. 

Full-back Wendell, Harvard. 

New York Press. 

Ends Kilpatrick, Yale; L. Smith, Har. 

Tackles Scully, Yale; McKay, Harvard. 

Guards Brown, Navy; Fisher, Harvard. 

Center Morris, Yale. 

Quarter-back.. .Sprackling, Brown. 

Half-backs McKay, Brown ; Wendell, Har. 

Full-back Mercer, Pennsylvania. 

New York Sun. 

Ends Kilpatrick, Yale; Smith, Har. 

Tackles Scully, Yale; McKay, Harvard. 

Guards Fisher, Harvard ; Brown, Navy. 

Center Cozens, Pensylvania. 

Quarter-back.. .Sprackling, Brown. 

Half-backs McKay, Brown; Wendell, Har. 

FuU-back Mercer, Pennsylvania. 



New York Tribum. 
Kilpatrick, Yale; L. Smith, Har. 
McKay, Harvard; Paul, Yale. 
Brown, Navy; Fisher, Harvard. 
Cozens, Pennsylvania. 
Sprackling, Brown. 
Mercer,U.of Pa.; Wendell, Har. 
McKay, Brown. 



New York Evening Post. 
Kilpatrick, Y.; Gilchrist, Navy. 
McKay, Har.; Withington, Har. 
Fisher, Harvard; Brown, Navy. 
Morris, Yale. 
Howe, Yale. 

McKay, Brown; Sprackling, Br. 
Wendell, Harvard 



New York Times. 
Kilpatrick, Yale; L. Smith, Har. 
McKay, Har.; Sherwin, Dart. 
Minot, Harvard ; Fisher, Har. 
Cozens, Pennsylvania. 
Sprackling, Brown. 
Wendell, Harvard; Daly, Yale. 
Dalton, Navy. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



25 



By E. H. Coy in 
New York Morning World. 

Ends Kilpatrick, Yale; L. Smith, Har. 

Tackles McKay, Harvard; Paul, Yale. 

Guards Weir, Army: Fisher, Harvard. 

Center Morris, Yale. 

Quarter-back... Sprackling, Brown, 

Half-backs Wendell, Har. ; McKay, Brown. 

Full-back Mercer, Pennsylvania. 

New York Evening Telegram, 

Ends Kilpatrick, Yale; Smith, Har. 

Tackles Scully, Yale; McKay, Harvard. 

Guards Brown, Navy; Fisher, Harvard. 

Center Morris, Yale. 

Quarter-back... Sprackling, Brown. 

Half-backs McKay, Brown; Wendell, Har. 

Full-back Howe, Yale. 



By Hamilton Fish, Jr., in 
New York Morning World. 

Kilpatrick, Yale. L. Smith. Har. 

McKay, Harvard; Paul, Yale. 

Weir, Army; Fisher, Harvard. 

Cozens, Pennsylvania. 

Sprackling, Brown. 

Corbett, Har.; Wendell, Har. 

McKay, Brown. 



New York Evening Mail. 
Kilpatrick, Yale; L. Smith, Har. 
Scully, Yale; McKay, Harvard. 
Fisher, Harvard; Weir, Army. 
Cozens, Pennsylvania. 
Sprackling, Brown. 
Corbett, Har.; Wendell, Har. 
McKay, Brown. 



By Robert Edgren in 
New York Evening World. 

Ends Kilpatrick, Yale; Daley, Dart. 

Tackles Scully, Yale; McKay, Harvard. 

Guards Fisher, Harvard; Wilson, Prin. 

Center Cozens, Pennsylvania. 

Quarter-back.. . Sprackling, Brown. 

Half-backs Pendleton, Prin. ; Wendell, Har. 

Full-back Ingersoll, Dartmouth. 

Brooklyn Citizen, 

Ends Kilpatrick, Y.; Ashbaugh.Bro'n 

Tackles McKay, Har. ; Withington, Har. 

Guards Arnold, Army; Weir, Army. 

Center Cozens, Pennsylvania. 

Quarter-back... Sprackling, Brown. 

Half-backs Pendleton, Prin ; Wendell, Har. 

Full-back Hart, Princeton. 

Boston Herald. 

Ends Kilpatrick, Yale; Smith, Har. 

Tackles McKay, Har.; Lovejoy, Dart. 

Guards Withington, Har.; Fisher, Har. 

Center Arnold, West Point. 

Quarter-back... Sprackling, Brown. 

Half-backs Corbett, Har,; Wendell, Har. 

Full-back Field, Yale. 

Baltimore News. 

Ends. Kilpatrick, Yale; Smith, Har. 

Tackles .Scully, Yale; McKay, Harvard. 

Guards Fisher, Harvard; Brown. Navy. 

Center ... Cozens, Pennsylvania. 

Quarter-back . . Sprackling. Brown, 

Half-backs Pendleton, Prin. ; Wendell, Har. 

Full-back Mercer, Pennsylvania. 



Brooklyn Daily Eagle. 
Kilpatrick, Yale; Brooks, Yale. 
McKay.Har.; Withington, Har. 
Cozens, U. of Pa.; Fisher, Har. 
Arnold, Army. 
Sprackling, Brown. 
Corbett, Har.; Wendell, Har. 
Ramsdell, Pennsylvania. 



Boston Journal. 
Kilpatrick, Yale; Smith, Har. 
Hart, Prin. ; Lovejoy, Dart. 
Withington, Har.; Fisher, Har. 
Morris, Yale. 
Sprackling, Brown. 
Ramsdell, Pa.; McKay, Brown. 
Mercer, Pennsylvania. 

Springfield Republican. 
Kilpatrick, Yale; Smith, Har. 
McKay, Harvard; Scully, Yale. 
Filmore, Lafay.; Fisher, Har. 
Pinkett, Amherst. 
Sprackling, Brown. 
Pendleton, Prin.; McKay, Bro'n 
Wendell, Harvard. 



Baltimore Sun. 
Kilpatrick, Y.; Gilchrist, Navy. 
McKay, Harvard; Paul, Yale. 
Weir, Army; Brown, Navy. 
Cozens, Pennsylvania. 
Sprackling, Brown. 
Pendleton, Prin. ; Wendell, Har. 
Mercer, Pennsylvania. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



27 



By W. S. Farnsworth in 

New Haven Register. Louisville Herald. 

Ends . Kilpatrick, Yale; Smith, Har. Kilpatrick, Yale; Lewis, Har. 

Tackles Scully, Yale; McKay, Harvard. McKay, Har. ; Withington, Har. 

Guards Brown, Navy; Fisher, Har. Weir, West Point; Fisher, Har. 

Center Cozens, Pennsylvania. Arnold, West Point. 

Quarter-back... Sprackling, Brown. Sprackling, Brown. 

Half-backs Wendell, Har. ; McKay, Brown. Pendleton, Prin.; Corbett, Har. 

Full-back Mercer, Pennsylvania. Wendell, Harvard. 

ALL- WESTERN SELECTIONS 

By Walter H. Eckersall in By E. G. Westlake in 

Chicago Tribune. The Chicago Evening Post. 

Ends Wells, Mich.; Borleske, Mich. Wells, Michigan; Dean, Wis. 

Tackles Edmunds, Mich. ; Walker, Minn. Walker,Minn. ; Edmunds, Mich, 

Guards Butzer, 111. ; Benbrook, Mich. Benbrook, Mich.; Butzer, 111. 

Center Twist, Illinois. Twist, Illinois. 

Quarter-back.. .McGovern, Minnesota. McGovern, Minnesota. 

Half-backs Seiler, 111.; Magidsohn, Mich. Rosen wald, Minn.; Magidsohn, 

Full-back Johnston, Minnesota, Johnston, Minnesota. [Mich. 

Chicago Record-Herald. Chicago Daily News. 

Ends Wells, Mich.; Dean, Wisconsin. Wells, Mich ; Lyons, Illinois. 

Tackles Walker, Minn.; Dutter, Ind. Dutter, Indiana; Walker, Minn. 

Guards Benbrook, Mich.; Butzer, 111. Benbrook, Mich.; Butzer, I1L 

Center Corn well, Michigan. Collins, Nebraska. 

Quarter-back.. .McGovern, Minnesota. [Minn. McGovern. Minnesota. 

Half-backs Magidsohn, Mich.; Rosen wald, Magidsohn, Mich.; Seiler, 111. 

Full-back Johnston, Minnesota. Johnston, Minnesota. 

By E. C. Patterson. Cleveland Leader ( Yost) . 

Ends Wells, Mich.; Seiler, Illinois. Dean, Wisconsin; Wells, Mich. 

Tackles Walker, Minn.; Dutter, Ind. Walker, Minn.; Edmunds.Mich. 

Guards Benbrook, Mich.; Butzer, 111. Benbrook, Mich.; Butzer, 111. 

Center Twist, Illinois. Cornwell, Michigan. 

Quarter-back... McGovern, Minnesota. [Minn. McGovern, Minnesota. [Minn. 

Half-backs Magidsohn, Mich.; Rosen wald, Magidsohn, Mich.; Johnston. 

Full-back Johnston, Minnesota. Exelby, M. A. C. 

ALL-CONFERENCE SELECTIONS 

By E. G. Westlake in 

The Chicago Evening Post. Chicago Daily News. 

Ends Dean, Wisconsin; Berndt, Ind. Sauer, Chicago; Lyons, Illinois. 

Tackles Walker, Minn. ; Dutter, Ind. Dutter, Indiana; Walker, Minn. 

Guards Belting, Illinois; Butzer, Illinois Messick, Ind. ; Butzer, Illinois. 

Center Twist, Illinois. Twist, Illinois. 

Quarter-back . .McGovern, Minnesota. McGovern, Minnesota. 

Half-backs Seiler, 111.; Rosen wald, Minn. Gill, Indiana; Seiler, Illinois. 

Full-back ..... .Johnston, Minnesota. Johnston, Minn. 

By Walter H. Eckersall. . 

First Team. Second Team. 

Ends Dean, Wis.; Berndt, Indiana. Sauer, Chicago; Oliver, Illinois. 

Tackles Walker, Minn.; Dutter, Indiana Hatfield, Ind.; Young", Minn. 

Guards Messick, Indiana; Butzer, 111. Belting, 111.; Ward, North w'rn. 

Center . Twist, Illinois. Morrel, Minnesota. 

Quarter-back . . McGovern, Minnesota. Cunningham, Indiana. 

Half-backs. . . .Seiler, 111. ; Rosen wald, Minn. Crawley, Chicago; Gill, Ind, 

Full-back Johnston, Minnesota. Hyland, Iowa. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 29 

MISCELLANEOUS SELECTIONS 

Greater New York All-Scholastic Eleven (Evening World) — Ends, Telfer 
(Clinton) and Tabor (Boys' High); tackles, Hauser (Boys' High) and Ki~~^j 
(Manual); guards, McLoughlin (Commerce) and White (Clinton); center, 
Strong (Commerce); quarter-back, Gamble (Erasmus); half-backs, Greene 
(Manual) and Love (Commerce); full-back, Gallagher (Erasmus). 

Greater New York All-Star Scholastic Eleven (New York Press) — Ends, 
McMath (Erasmus) and Tabor (Boys' High) ; tackles, Wiener (Clinton) and 
Hauser (Boys' High); guards, Squires (Erasmus) and McLoughlin (Com- 
merce); center, Cook (Manual); quarter-back, Gamble (Erasmus); half-backs, 
Green (Manual) and Kleinert (Poly Prep.); full-back, Gallagher (Erasmus). 

Greater New York All-Scholastic Team (New York Sun) — Ends, McMath 
(Erasmus) and Tabor (Boys' High); tackles, Wiener (Clinton) and Hauser 
(Boys' High); guards, Squires (Erasmus) and Dingwall (Manual); center, 
Cook (Manual) ; quarter-back, Gamble (Erasmus) ; half-backs, Reimers (Eras- 
mus) and Fonda (Boys' High); full-back, Gallagher (Erasmus). 

Greater New York All-Scholastic Eleven (New York Herald) — Ends, Tabor 
(Boys' High) and Telfer (Clinton) ; tackles, Kinney (Manual) and Hauser 
(Boys' High); guards, McLoughlin (Commerce) and Squires (Erasmus) ; .cen- 
ter, Strong (Commerce); quarter-back, Gamble (Erasmus); half-backs, Fonda 
(Boys' High) and Feigus (Morris); full-back, Gallagher 'Erasmus). 

Greater New York All-Scholastic Eleven (New York Tribune) — Ends, Tabor 
(Bo>s' High) and McMath (Erasmus) ; tackles, Haaser (Boys' High) ai.d 
Kinney (Manual); guards, McLoughlin (Commerce) and White (Clinton); 
center. Strong, (Commerce); quarter-back, Gamcle (Erasmus); half-backs, 
Greene (Manual) and Love (Commerce); full-back, Gallagher (Erasmus). 

Greater New York All-Scholastic Eleven (Evening Telegram) — Ends, Tabor 
(Boys' High) and Telfer (Clinton) ; tackles, Hauser (Boys' High) and 
Wiener (Clinton); guards, Squires (Erasmus) and Spamer (Morris); center, 
Strong (Commerce); quarter-back, Gamble (Erasmus); half-backs, Fetter 
(Commerce) and Cendoya (Poly Prep.); full-back, Gallagher (Erasmus). 

Greater New York All-Scholastic Eleven (New York Globe) — Ends, McMath 
(Erasmus) and Tabor (Boys' High) ; tackles, Weiner (Clinton) and Hauser 
(Boys' High); guards, McLoughlin (Commerce) and Dingwall (Manual); 
center, Strong (Commerce) ; quarter-back, Gamble (Erasmus) ; half-backs, 
Reimers (Erasmus) and Feigus (Morris); full-back, Gallagher (Erasmus). 

Greater New York All-Star Scholastic Eleven (New York American) — 
Ends, Telfer (Clinton) and Tabor (Boys' High) ; tackles, Weiner- (Clinton) 
and Hauser (Boys' High); guards, Squires (Erasmus) and Kinney (Manual); 
center, Strong (Commerce) ; quarter-back, Gamble (Erasmus) ; half-backs, 
Feigus (Morris) and Fetter (Commerce); full-back, Gallagher (Erasmus). 

All-Manhattan Team (Evening World) — Ends, Telfer (Clinton) and McCusker 
(Commerce) ; tackles, Weiner (Clinton) and Cholaire (Commerce) ; guards, 
McLoughlin (Commerce) and White (Clinton); center, Strong (Commerce); 
quarter-back, Cherr (Commerce) ; half-backs, Feigus (Morris) and Love (Com- 
merce) ; full-back, Blenio (Commerce). 

Manhatttan All-Star Scholastic Eleven (New York American) — Ends, Telfer 
(Clinton) and Wright (Clinton) ; tackles, Weiner (Clinton) and Mouchrie 
(Morris) ; guards, White (Clinton) and McLoughlin (Commerce) ; center, 
Strong (Commerce) ; quarter-back, Cumiskey (Clinton) ; half-backs, Feigus 
(Morris) and Fetter (Commerce); full-back, Blenio (Commerce). 

Brooklyn All-Scholastic Eleven (New York American) — Ends, Tabor (Boys' 
High) and Cendoya (Poly Prep.); tackles* Hauser (Boys' High) and Kleinert 
(Poly Prep.); guards, Squires (Erasmus) and Dingwall (Manual); center, 
Kinney (Manual); quarter-back, Gamble (Erasmus); half-backs, Foley (Man- 
ual) and Jamer (Erasmus); full-back, Gallagher (Erasmus). 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 31 

Brooklyn All-Scholastic Eleven (Brooklyn Daily Eagle) — Ends, Tabor (Boys' 
High) and McNulty (Brooklyn Prep.); tackles, Hauser (Boys' High) and 
Kleinert (Poly Prep.); guards, Squires (Erasmus) and Dingwall (Manual); 
•center, Kinney (Manual); quarter-back, Gamble (Erasmus); half-backs, 
McKinney (Erasmus) and Gallagher (Erasmus) ; full-back, Trenkman 
(Ade^hi). 

All-Scholastic Manhattan-Bronx Eleven (Evening Telegram) — Ends, McCus- 
ker (Commerce) and Telfer (Clinton) ; tackles, Phillippi (Morris) and Wiener 
(Clinton); guards, McLoughlin (Commerce) and Spamer (Morris); center, 
Strong (Commerce) ; quarter-back, Cumiskey (Clinton) ; half-backs, Fetter 
(Commerce) and Feigus (Morris); full-back, Rozsa (Clinton). 

All- Scholastic Brooklyn Eleven (Evening Telegram) — Ends, Tabor (Boys' 
High) and Balcom (Erasmus); tackles, Hauser (Boys' High) and Kleinert 
(Poly Prep.); guards. Squires (Erasmus) and Dingwall (Manual); center, 
Dobbins (Boys' High); quarter-back, Gamble (Erasmus); half-backs, Greene 
(Manual) and Cendoya (Poly Prep.); full-back, Gallagher (Erasmus). 

Central New York Interscholastic Eleven (Syracuse Journal)— Ends, Mitchell 
(St. John's M.A.) and Leyden (Geneva); tackles, Gorman (Binghamton) and 
Hilton (Binghamton); guards. Saddler (St. John's M.A.) and Smith (Lafay- 
ette) ; center, McLaughlin (Central High) ; quarter-back, Yeager (Central 
High); half-backs, Fearlman (Central High) and Schaefer (Central High); 
iull-back. Lake (Binghamton). 

Buffalo All-High School Eleven (Buffalo Evening News) — Ends, Barnes 
(Technical) and Edmunds (Lafayette); tackles, Freeman (Masten Park) and 
Smithson (Lafayette) ; guards, Adams (Lafayette) and Evans (Masten Park) ; 
-center, Coughlin (Technical); quarter-back, Burford (Technical); half-backs, 
Hobinson (Lafayette) and Deitzer (Lafayette); full-back, Myers (Central). 

Buffalo All-High School Eleven (Buffalo Sunday Express) — Ends, Edmunds 
(Lafayette) and Sullivan (Masten Park); tackles, Smithson (Lafayette) and 
Preeman (Masten Park); guards, Hennig (Masten Fark) and Forst-er (Masten 
Park); center, Betts (Nichols); quarter-back; Lane (Lafayette); half-backs, 
Pobinson (Lafayette) and Deitzer (Lafayette); full-back, Goldberg (Masten 
Park). 

Greater Boston All-Scholastic Eleven (by John J. Hallahan, Boston) — Ends, 
Lucas (Maiden High) and Manning (Quincy High); tackles, Benoit (Maiden 
High) and Anderson (Maiden High) ; guards, Swart (Rindge) and Pender- 
.gast (Boston Latin); center, Brawley (Medford High); quarter-back, Logan 
(Boston Xatin) ; half-backs. Garland (Somerville High) and Westcott (Maiden 
High); full-back, Fraser (Dorchester High). 

All-Western Pennsylvania Eleven (Pittsburg Leader) — Ends, Piolette (Penn 
State) and Lindsay (Pittsburg); tackles, McDowell (W. and J.) and Weaver 
(Penn State); guards, Blair (Pittsburg) and Gray (Penn State); center, 
"Galvin (Pittsburg) ; quarter-back, Dewar (Pittsburg) ; half-backs, Wallace 
(W. and J.) and Engel (Penn State); full-back, Richards (Pittsburg). 

All-Western Pennsylvania Scholastic Eleven (Richard Guy in Pittsburg 
Gazette-Times) — Ends. Lyons and Ewing (Pittsburg H.S.); tackles, Gass 
(Pittsburg H.S.) and Furry (Kiski) ; guards, Parkin (Shadyside Academy) 
and Blumenthal (East Liberty Academy); center, Taylor (Kiski); quarter- 
back, Morris (Kiski); half-backs, McCarter (Beaver Falls H.S.) and Sheren 
(Kiski); full-back, Younkin (Butler H.S.). 

All-Western Pennsylvania Eleven (Pittsburg Dispatch) — Ends, Piolette 
(Penn State) and Very (Penn State) ; tackles, Harlow (Penn State) and 
Weaver (Penn State); guards, Blair (Pittsburg) and Dallenbach (Pittsburg); 
•center, Galvin (Pittsburg); quarter-back, Dewar (Pittsburg); half-backs, 
Engel (Penn State) and Hittner (Pittsburg); full-back, Richards (Pittsburg). 
Philadelphia All-Scholastic Eleven (Philadelphia Evening Times) —Ends, 
Campuzano (Central Manual] and Clement (Central High) ; tackles, Matthews 
(Catholic High) and Scott (Central Manual) ; guards, Orleman 'Penn Char- 
ter) and Bolger (Central High) ; center, Woertz (Central Manual); quarter- 
back, Craig (Central High) ; half-backs, Fritz (Central High) and Kelly 
(Central Manual); full-back, McCue (St. Joseph's). 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 33 

All-Western Pennsylvania Scholastic Eleven (Pittsburg Leader) — Ends, 
Lyons (Pittsburg High) and Ewing (Pittsburg High) ; tackles, Gass (Pitts- 
burg High) and Miller (Shadyside Academy) ; guards, Parkin (Shadyside 
Academy) and Blumenthal (East Liberty Academy); center, Shaw (Pitts- 
burg High); quarter-back, Glick (Pittsburg High); half-backs, Erickson 
(Pittsburg High) and McConnell (Shadyside Academy) ; full-back, McCuteheon 
(Pittsburg High). 

Philadelphia All-Scholastic Eleven (Philadelphia Evening Bulletin)— Ends, 
Murdock (Episcopal) and Clement (Central High) ; tackles, Allen (Penn 
Charter) and Scott (Central Manual) ; guards, Laird (Chestnut Hill) and 
Bolger (Central High) ; center, Woertz (Central Manual) ; quarter-back, Lentz 
(Central Manual)'; half-backs, Fritz (Central High) and Craig (Central 
High); full-back, McCue (St. Joseph's). 

All-Ohio Eleven (Sporting Writers' Selection) — Ends, Powell (Ohio 
State) and Bowie (Reserve); tackles, Snider (Reserve) and Rosendale (Case); 
guards, Lind (Reserve) and Hall (Ohio State) ; center, Abbott (Case) ; 
quarter-back, Nichols (Oberlin) ; half-backs, Wells (Ohio State) and Twitchell 
(Case); full back. Heller (Case). 

All-Ohio Eleven (T. L. Terrell in Cleveland Leader)— Ends, Bowie (Reserve) 
and Powell (Ohio State) ; tackles, Snider (Reserve) and Rosendale (Case) ; 
guards, Lind (Reserve) and Hall (Ohio State); center, McDaniels (Oberlin) 
or Abbott (Case) ; quarter-back, Nicholls (Oberlin) ; half-backs, Wells (Ohio 
State) and Kagy (Reserve), or Twitchell (Case) and Shepard (Ohio Wes- 
leyan); full-back. Heller (Case). 

All-Senate High School Eleven (Cleveland Plain Dealer)— Ends, Seelbach 
(Lincoln) and McConnell (Central) ; tackles, Blue (Central) and Hanscom 
(Central); guards, Corlett (East) and Weiler (Central); center, Roe (Cen- 
tral) ; quarter-back, Gordon (Lincoln) ; half-backs, Schreiner (East) and 
Mueller (West); full-back, Coates (Central). 

All-Ohio Conference Eleven (Guy T. Rockwell in Cleveland Plain Dealer)— 
Ends, Bowie (Reserve) and Powell (State) ; tackles, Snider (Reserve) and 
Rosendale (Case) ; guards, Lind (Reserve) and Hall (State) ; center, McDan- 
iels (Oberlin) ; quarter-back, Nicholls (Oberlin) ; half-backs, Wells (State) 
and Rupp (Denison) ; full-back, Heller (Case). 

Cleveland All-Scholastic Eleven (Elwood V. Street in Cleveland Leader)— 
Ends, Hense (Shaw) and Lawrence (University School) ; tackles, Weather- 
head (University School) and Taylor (Shaw) ; guards, Corlett (East) and 
Blue (Central); Center, Roe (Central); quarter-back, Bushnell (Shaw); half- 
backs, Scovrll (University School) and Coates (Central) ; full-back, Smith 
(Shaw). 

Cleveland All-Scholastic Eleven (Cleveland Plain Dealer)— Ends, Lawrence 
(University School) and McConnell (Central) ; tackles, Weatherhead (Univer- 
sity School) and Guthrie (University School) ; guards, Corlett (East) and 
Weiler (Central): center, Roe (Central); quarter-back, Bushnell (Shaw); 
half-backs, Barrett (University School) and Coates (Central); full-back, 
Smith (Shaw). 

All-Ohio Eleven (by Clinton P. Parker, Sporting Editor Akron Beacon- 
Journal) — Ends, Wilhoyt (Buchtel) and Grimm (Buchtel) ; tackles, Costigan 
(Buchtel) and Logie (Reserve); guards, Hall (State) and Scott (Buchtel); 
center, Selby (Buchtel) ; quarter-back, Nichols (Oberlin) ; half-backs, Rupp 
(Denison) and Twitchell (Case); full-back, Jackson (Buchtel). 

Cleveland All-Scholastic Eleven (by Irving R. Garbutt) — Ends, Hogsett 
(University) and Jones (Glenville) ; tackles, Estep (Central) and Smith 
(Shaw); guards, Mortimer (West) and Blue (Central); center, Roe (Central); 
quarter-back, Goodman (Central) ; half-backs, McKenney (East) and Kenyon 
(Shaw); full-back, Coates (Central). 

Cincinnati All-Athletic Club Eleven (Cincinnati Commercial Tribune) — Ends, 
Fuller (First Regiment) and Baurittel (First Regiment); tackles, Shafer 
(Celts) and Crow (First Regiment) ; guards, Grogan (Christ Church) and Bid 
(First Regiment); center, O'Meara (Celts); quarter-back, Podesta (Celts); 
half-backs, Scallon (First Regiment) and Smith (Celts); full-back, Michels 
(Celts). 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 35 

Cincinnati All-High School Eleven (Cincinnati Commercial Tribune)— Ends, 
Craig (Hughes) and Latta (Walnut HillsO ; tackles, Levi (Walnut Hills) and 
Schick (Hughes); guards, Heckerman (Franklin) and Foscula (Woodward); 
center, Gregg (Hughes) ; quarter-back, Palmer (Walnut Hills) ; half-backs, 
Schuessler (Walnut Hills) and Juilleratt (Hughes); full-back, Wells 
(Covington) . 

All-South Atlantic Eleven (by W. A. Lambeth, University of Virginia) — 
Ends, Bowen (Virginia) and Winston (N. C. U.); tackles. Hart (George 
Washington) and Geyer (Virginia) ; guards, Fitzgerald (Georgetown) and 
Thompson (Carolina); center, Bray (N. C. A. and M); quarter-back, Cos- 
tello (Georgetown); half-backs, Fury (Georgetown) and Robertson (N. C. A. 
and M.); full-back, Hodgson (V. P. I.) 

All-Southern Eleven (Grantland Rice and J. W. Heisman, jointly, in 
Atlanta Constitution)— Ends. Neely (Vanderbilt) and Gillein (Sewanee); 
tackles, Freeland (Vanderbilt) and Patterson (Tech); guards, Metzger (Van- 
derbilt) and Kinnebrew (Mississippi) ; center, Caton (Auburn) ; quarter-back, 
Browne (Sewanee) ; half-backs, R. Morrison (Vanderbilt) and McWhorter 
(Georgia) ; full-back, Streit (Auburn). 

All-Southern Eleven (Dick Jemison in Atlanta Constitution)— Ends. Cogdell 
(Auburn) and Gillem (Sewanee) ; tackles, Faulkinberry (Sewanee) and Free- 
land (Vanderbilt) ; guards, Metzger (Vanderbilt) and Allen (Auburn) ; center, 
Caton (Auburn); quarter-back, Brown (Sewanee); half-backs, R. Morrison 
(Vanderbilt) and Lanier (Sewanee); full-back, Streit (Auburn). 

Georgia All-rrep. Eleven (R. B. Dunbar in Atlanta Georgian) — Ends, R. 
Smith (Riverside) and Peddy (Stone Mountain) ; tackles, Malone (Stone 
Mountain) and Dodd (Riverside) ; guards, Moore (Locust Grove) and Hender- 
son (Gordon) ; center, A. DeLaperriere (Riverside) ; quarter-back, Brown 
(Locust Grove) or Smith (Riverside) ; half-backs, Wheatley (Stone Mountain) 
and Carey (Stone Mountain); full-back, Lokey (Riverside). 

All-Kentucky Eleven (Jack T. Sallee in Louisville Courier-Journal)— Ends, 
Duffy (Central) and Walker (Central); tackles, W. Selbach (Central) and L. 
Selbach (Central); guards, Francis (Transylvania) and Todd (Central); 
center, Webb (State); quarter-back. Clark (Central); half-backs, Shanklin 
(State) and Pidgeon (Central); full-back, Ramsey (Central). 

All-Kentucky Eleven (Clyde B. Davis in Louisvivlle Herald)— Ends, McHat- 
ton (Transylvania) and Duffy (Central); tackles, L. Selbach (Central) and: 
Francis (Transylvania); guards. Todd (Central) and Earle (Kentucky State); 
center, Webb (Kentucky State) ; quarter-back, Gaiser (Kentucky State) ;' 
half-backs. Shanklin (Kentucky State) and Pidgeon (Central) ; full-back, . 
Ramsey (Central). 

All-Louisville Scholastic Eleven (Coach Small in Louisville Herald)— Ends,. 
Roth (High School) and Rubel (High School); tackles, Crutcher (Manual), 
and Staebler (K.M.I.) : guards, Piggott (High School) and Abbett (High; 
School): center, Gray (High School); quarter-back, Rudy (University); half- 
backs, Pheley (High School) and Miller (Manual); full-back, Brand (K.M.I.).. 

Louisville All-Star Scholastic Eleven (George Ewald in Louisville Courier- 
Journal)— Ends, Rubel (High School) and Rudy (University); tackles, 
Crutcher (Manual) and Wilkin (K.M.I.) ; guards, Bixby (High School) and 
Sullivan (Manual); center, Gray (High School); quarter-back, Johnson 
(Manual); half-backs, Brand (K.M.I.) and Miller (Manual); full-back, Pheley 
(High School). 

Chicago All-High School Eleven (Chicago Tribune)— Ends, Cahn (Wendell 
Phillips) and Pollard (Lane); tackles, Allen (Englewood) and Konald (Oak 
Park); guards, Cohn (Crane) and Bell (Hyde Park); center, Des Jardiena 
(Wendell Phillips); quarter-back, Ghee (Oak Park); half-backs, Russell (Oak 
Park) and Bates (Lane); full-back, Moulton (Wendell Phillips). 

Illinois-Wisconsin All-Star Eleven (Chicago Record-Herald)— Ends. Hassett 
(Ripon) and Wolfe (Beloit) ; tackles, Parkins (Lake Forest) and StrinkhauS 
(Wesleyan) ; guards, Yoder (Milliken) and Fruith (Rinon); center. Baer 
(Lake Forest); quarter-back. West (Lake Forest); half-backs, Collette 
(Beloit) and Thomas (Lake Forest); full-back, Smith (Lake Forest). 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 37 

All-Cook County High School Eleven (Chicago Evening Post)— Ends, Cahn 
(Wendell Phillips) and Pollard (Lane); tackles, Scanlan (Hyde Park) and 
Allen (Eng.ewood); guards, Cotter (Oak Park) and Johnson (Lane); center, 
Des Jardiens (Wendell Phillips); quarter-back. Ghee (Oak Park); half-backs, 
Russell (Oak Park) and McDownell (Lane); full-back, Wayman (Wendell 
Phillips). 

Cook County High School All-Star Eleven (by Kellogg M. Patterson) — Ends, 
I ollard (Lane) and Cahn (Wendell Phillips); tackles, Cotter (Oak Park) and 
Allen (Englewood); guards, Mac-ember (Oak Park) and Des Jardiens (Wen- 
dell Phillips); center, Bell (H> *e Park); quarter-back, Ghee (Oak Park); 
half-backs, Russell (Oak Park) and McDownell (Lane) ; full-back, W'ayman 
(W end-ell Phillips). 

All-Illinois Minor College Eleven ("Mike" Lynch in Rock Island Daily 
Union) — Ends, Dunsmore (Lake Forest) and Shatford (William and Vashti) ; 
tackles, McCord (William and Vashti) and Yoder (Millikin) ; guards, 
McMurray (Illinois Wesleyan) and Paskins (Lake Forest) ; center, Rhodes 
(Illinois Wesleyan); quarter-back, Niles (Illinois Wesleyan); half-backs, 
Thomas (Lake Forest) and C. Clark (William and Vashti) ; full-back, Smith 
(Lake Forest). 

All-Michigan High School Eleven (by L. P. Jocelyn)— Ends, Boville (Detroit 
Central) and Jacks (Muskegon) ; tackles, Raynsford (Detroit Central) and 
Cohrs (Muskegon); guards, Kurtzworth (Detroit Central) and Webster 
(Adrian) ; center, Mazurkiewiez (Grand Rapids) ; quarterback, Keller (Detroit 
Central); half-backs, Coutchie (Muskegon) and Cooper (Saginaw); full-back, 
Maulbetsch (Ann Arbor). 

All-Michigan High School Eleven (by Coach Sherman Wilson) — Ends, 
McNabb (Grand Rapids) and Fred Jacks (Muskegon); tackles, Francis Jacks 
(Muskegon) and Raynsford (Detroit Central) ; guards, Kurtzworth (Detroit 
Central) and Merritt (Detroit Central): center, Passolt (Saginaw); quarter- 
back, Kellar (Detroit Central); half-backs, Maulbetsch (Ann Arbor) and 
Coutchie (Muskegon); full-back, Cohrs (Muskegon); 

All-Missouri Valley Conference Eleven (William Hollenback in St. Louis 
Post-Dispatch) — Ends, Chauner (Nebraska) and Burress (Missouri) ; tackles, 
Shonka (Nebraska) and Temple (Nebraska) ; guards, Davidson (Kansas) and 
Thatcher (Missouri); center, Collins (Missouri); quarter-back, Warner 
(Nebraska); half-backs, Frank (Nebraska) and Murphy (Iowa); full-back, 
Hackney (Missouri). 

All-Missouri Eleven (by C. E. McBride, Sporting Editor Kansas City Star) — 
Ends, Griebel (Warrensburg) and Martin (Wentworth); tackles. McElhinney 
(Westminster) and Lansing (Missouri Valley) ; guards, Littlefield (Kirks- 
rille) and Powell (Central); center, Steele (Westminster); quarter-back, 
Marston (Kirksville) ; half-backs, Mann (Central) and Bland (Central) ; full- 
back, Smith (Central). 

All-Missouri Valley Eleven (by C. E. McBride, Sporting Editor Kansas City 
Star)— Ends, Burress (Missouri) and Chauner (Nebraska) ; tackles, Temple 
(Nebraska) and Shonka (Nebraska) ; guards, Thacher (Missouri) and Ammons 
(Kansas); center, Collins (Nebraska); quarter-back, Warner (Nebraska); 
half-backs, Murphy (Iowa) and Frank (Nebraska) ; full-back, Hackney 
(Missouri). 

All-Iowa High School Eleven (by H. L. Van Metre, Coach Clinton H. S.) — 
Ends, LeProvost (Clinton) and Wilson (Tipton) ; tackles, Stuart (Clinton) 
and Taylor (Iowa City); guards, Packard (Marshalltown) and Meyers (Des 
Moines); center, Vickerstaff (Clinton); quarter-back, Yount (Fairfield); half- 
backs, Parsons (Iowa City) and Byers (Des Moines) ; full-back, Scholz 
(Davenport). 

All-Denver High School Eleven (Denver Post) — Ends, Muncaster (Manual) 
and Glendenning (East); tackles, Anderson (South) and Riley (South); 
guards, Durbin (East) and Gibson (North) ; center, Barker (Manual) ; quarter- 
back, Stringham (West): half-backs, Kennedy (Manual) and Peterson (East) ; 
fall-back, Johnson (North). 




1, Kennedy; 2, R. Wood; 3, Downs; 4, Baumgartner, Mgr. ; 5, Vela; 6, Reese; 

7, Dobbins; 8, D. Wood; 9, Wily: 10, Herwig; 11, Cox; 12, Knox; 13, Rause; 

14, Price; 15, Black, Capt. ; 1G, Dunn. Chautauqua Photo Co., Photo. 

LEHIGH UNIVERSITY. 




1, Dickson, Coach; 2, Moore; 3, Duff; 4, Wolfe; 5, Boyle; 6, Dunkle; 7, 
Thatcher; 8, Bartholomew: 9. Whited: 10. Teamer: 11, Lyne: 12, Daniels; 13, 
McNultv, Mgr.; 14, Arnold; 15, Schmidt: 1G. Snyder: 17, Clark. Capt.; 18, 
Tyson; '19. Kerstetter: 20. Jordan; 21. Bogart; 22, Hippie; ' 23, O'Brian; 24, 
Kurtz; 25, Zahner; 26, Waldner, 27, Murray; 28, Edmonson; 29, Richards; 
30, Austin; 31, Richardson. Ginter & Cook, Photo. 

BUCKNELL UNIVERSITY. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 39 

All-Rocky Mountain Eleven (Denver Republican) — Ends, Vandemoer (C.C.) 
and Douglass (Mines); tackles, Home (Utah) and Curtis (Denver); guards, 
O'Brien (C.C.) and Black (C.C); center, Witherow (C.C): quarter-back. 
Burgess (Wyoming); half-backs, Crowley (Denver) and Romney (Utah); 
full-back, Richardson (Utah). 

All-Colorado Eleven (Denver Republican)— Ends, Vandemoer (C.C.) and 
Douglass (Mines); tackles, Bowers (C.C) and Curtis (Denver): guards, 
O'Brien (Colorado) and Black (C.C); center, Witherow (C.C); quarter-back. 
Walker (Denver): half-backs, Crowley (Denver) and McFadden (Colorado); 
full-back, Koonsman (Denver). 

All-Colorado Eleven (Joseph R. Curtis in Denver Post)— Ends. Sinton (C.C.) 
and Douglass (Mines); tackles, Shaefer (Aggies) and Curtis (Denver) ; guards. 
Hedblom (C.C) and O'Brien (Colorado); center, Witherow (C.C); quarter- 
back. Walker (Denver): half-backs, Crowley (Denver) and Vandemoer (C.C); 
full-back, Carmichael (Colorado). 

All-Colorado Eleven (Edward C Day in Denver Times)— Ends. Sinton (C.C.) 
and Vandemoer (C.C); tackles. Shaefer (Aggies) and Curtis (Denver); 
guards. Hedblom (C.C) and O'Brien (Colorado); center. Witherow (C.C); 
quarter-back. Walker (Denver) : half-backs, McFadden (Colorado) and Crowley 
(Denver); full-back, Rich (Colorado). 

All -Texas Eleven (by J. Burton Rix)— Ends. Estill (U. of Texas) and 

Ward (A. and M.); tackles, Barnes (A. and M.) and Hohn (A. and M.); 

; guards. Cretcher (A. and M.) and Ramsdell (U. of Texas); center. Henry 

I (Baylor) : quarter-back. Wylie (Baylor) : half-backs, Headrick (Southwestern) 

and Robinson (Baylor); full-back, Little (Baylor). 

All-Southwestern Eleven (by Capt. H. E. Van Surdam)— Ends. Hoover (El 
Paso H.S.) and Riggins (Roswell); tackles, Keenan (Institute) and Merrill 
(Aggies); guards, Pomeroy (Institute) and Short (Roswell); center. Sorenson 
(Institute); quarter-back, Chenoweth (El Paso H.S.); half-backs, McCoy 
(Institute) and Higgins (Ro-sweli) ; full-back, Rolletti (Arizona). 

All-Wisconsin-Illinois Eleven (by Burt Kennedy) — Ends, Hassett (Ripon) 
and Wolfe (Beloit) ; tackles, Paskins (Lake Forest) and Strinkhaus (Wes- 
leyan); guards, Baer (Lake Forest) and Rhodes (Wesleyan) : center, Yoder 
(Millikin); quarter-back, West (Lake Forest); half-backs. Collette (Beloit) 
and Thomas (Lake Forest); full-back, Smith (Lake Forest). 

All-California Eleven (by Albert G. Warldell)— Ends, Hill (U.S.C) and 
Rice (Pomona); tackles. Landreth (Occidental) and Stookey (U.S.C); 
guards, Wieman (Occidental) and Keller (U.S.C): center. Allen (U.S.C); 
quarter-back. Clary (Pomona); half-backs, Paulin (U.S.C.) and Shutt 
(Pomona); full-back, Rennecker (Whittier). 

All-Southern California Interscholastic Eleven (by Albert G. Waddell) — 
Ends, Wright (U.S.C. Prep.) and Gridley (Throop) ; tackles. Seifert (Pasa- 
dena High) and Scott (U.S.C. Prep.); guards, Clement (Throop) and Haga- 
boom . (Santa Ana); center, O'Bear (U.S.C. Prep.): quarter-back, Hurd 
(Throop): half-backs, Lutz (Santa Ana) and Long (Long Beach H.S.); full- 
back, Wallace (U.S.C Prep.). 

All-Southern California Eleven (by Owen R. Bird)— Ends, Hill (U. S. C) 

and Clary (Pomona); tackles, Stookey (U. S. C.) and Landreth (Occidental): 

1 guards, Wiemen (Occidental) and Malcolm (U. S. C); center, Allen (U. S. 

C); quarter-back, Cohn (U. S. C): half-backs, Shutt (Pomona) and Paulin 

: (U. S. C); full-back, Rennecker (Whittier). 

All-Southern California Eleven (by Harry A.. Williams. Sporting Editor 
; Los Angeles Express)— Ends, Hill (U.S.C) and Hall (U.S.C); tackles, Lan- 
dreth (Occidental) and Davis (Pomona); guards., Malcolm (U.S.C.) and 
Smart (Occidental); center, Allen (U.S.C); quarter-back. Clary (Pomona); 
half-backs. Shutt (Pomona) and Paulin (U.S.C); full-back, Rennecker 
(Whittier). 

All-Northwest Eleven (Roscoe Fawcett in Spokane Inland Herald)— Ends, 
Galbraith (W.S.C) and Michael (Oregon); tackles, Eakins (U.W.) and 
Grimm (U.W.); guards, Laird (W.S.C.) and Harter (W.S.C): center, Dunn 
(O.A.C); quarter-back, Latourette (Oregon); half-backs, Taylor (Oregon) and 
Cox (Whitman); full-back, Keck CO.A.C). 




1, Gary; 2, Sibley; 3, Pinkett; 4, Guetter; 5, Baumau; 6, Cook; 7, Connolly; 
8, Creede; 9, McCague. Mgr. ; 10, Hubbard; 11, Madden; 12, Campbell. Capt.; 
13, Abele; 14. Fitts; 15, Miles. 

AMHERST (MASS.) COLLEGE. 




1, Riddle; 2, Barrett; 3, Barron; 4, Harlow; 5, Engle; 6, Manthe; 7, 
Miller; 8. Cuthbert, Mgr.; 9, Piollet; 10, Weaver; 11, Very; 12, Gray, Capt.; 
13, Johnson; 14. Watson; 15. Keller. 

PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 41 

All-Northwest High School Eleven (Roscoe Fawcett in Spokane Inland 
Herald)— Ends, Pynn (Spokane) and Wood (Lincoln); tackles, Bruce (Lincoln) 
and Gallagher (Spokane): guards, Bryant (Lincoln) and Runner (Spokane); 
center. Moulten (Aberdeen): quarter-back. Rock (Broadway); half-backs, 
Coblentz (Tacoma) and Kohler (Wenatchee); full-back, Foster (Wenatchee). 

All-Northwest Eleven (J. Newton Colver in the Spokane Spokesman-Review) 
—Ends, Husby (Washington) and Lewis (Whitman); tackles, Eakins (Wash- 
ington) and Laird (W.S.C.); guards, Hawley (O.A.C.) and Grimm (Washing- 
ton); center, Dunn (O.A.C.) ; quarter-back, Coyle (Washington); half-backs, 
Taylor (Oregon) and Main (Oregon); full-back, Keck (O.A.C.). 

All-Northwest Eleven (George Yarnell in Spokane Chronicle) — Ends, Hunt- 
ley (O.A.C.) and W. Grirum - (Washington); tackles. Eakins (Washington) 
and "Polly" Grimm (Washington); guards. J. Harter (W.S.C.) and Laird 
(W.S.C.); center. G. Harter (W.S.C); quarter-back, Latourette (Oregon); 
half-backs, Taylor (Oregon) and Main (Oregon); full-back, Keck (O.A.C). 

All-Ohio Eleven (Robert Read in Ohio State Journal) — Ends, Bowie 
(Reserve) and Littick (Wesleyan) ; tackles, Powell (State) and Rosendale 
(Case) ; guards, Lind (Reserve) and Hall (State) ; center, Abbott (Case) ; 
quarter-back, Nichols (Oberlin); half-backs, Wells (State) and Twitchell 
(Case); full-back, Thomssen (Wesleyan). 

All-Ohio Eleven (H. A. Miller in Columbus Dispatch) — Ends. Axtell (Ken- 
yon) and Rupp (Denison) ; tackles, Powell (State) and Snider (Reserve); 
guards, Lind (Reserve) and Hall (State) ; center, Abbott (Case) ; quarter- 
back, Nichols (Oberlin); half-backs, Wells (State) and Twitchell (Case); 
full-back, Thomssen (Wesleyan). 

All-Florida Eleven (by H. S. Pope, coach, and H. A. Martin, manager, 
Rollins College) — Ends, Harris (Rollins) and Pearson (Rollins) ; tackles, 
Albritton (Columbia.) and Waggener (U. of Florida) ; guards, Wetherill (Rol- 
lins) and Johnson (Columbia) ; center, Price (U. of Florida) ; quarter-back, 
Edgerton (U. of Florida) ; half-backs, Taylor (U. of Florida) and Snedegar 
(Stetson); full-back, Johnson (U. of Florida). 




1, Brown; 2. Bntler; 3, Keally, Trainer; 4, Blair; 5, Hinchman; 6, Reed; 7, 
Thompson, Coach; 8, Peacock; 9, Stevpnpon: 10. D. Richards; 11, Qnailey; 
12. Frankel; 13, R. Richards. Cant.; 14, Galvin; 15, Bailey: 16, Budd; 17, 
Gehleit; IS, Michel; 19, Hazlett; 20, Dewar; 21, Hittner; 2-2, Lindsey. 

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURG. Johnston, Photo. 




1, Piper; 2. Colebaugh; 3, Schantz; 4. R. Hartman; 5, Pontius; 6, Mt. 
Pleasant. Coach; 7, Wellor; 8, Jaeger; 9, Glossner. Capt. ; 10, Saylor; 11. 
G. ITaitraan; 12, Sykcs; 13, Wainpole; 14, Bridenbangh; 15, Schaffner; 16, 
Leonard. FRANKLIN AND MARSHALL COLLEGE. Miesse, Photo. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



Some Representative Teams and Their 
Work in 1910 



HARVARD The Yale-Harvard game was a fitting climax 

YA|_F to a most interesting season. Up to two 

weeks before this game, the day when Yale 
was defeated by Brown, no less than 21 to (it should be remem- 
bered that Harvard defeated Brown 12 to 0), there was evetry 
indication that Harvard would take revenge for the previous year, 
and her team justified this prediction so far as their side of the 
equation was concerned. Yale, on the other hand, took the lesson 
of the Brown game to heart, and improved so rapidly during that 
week as to defeat Princeton, and the following week entered into 
the Harvard contest with the determination and confidence that went 
far towards evening the chances. The game was played on the Yale 
field in New Haven and resulted in a tie. Harvard had chances to 
score in the early part of the game, while at the end Yale was in 
Harvard's territory with what looked like a promising opportunity. 
The game was interesting throughout, although any effective use 
of the forward pass was missing. 



YALE The Yale-Princeton game was one of the 

PRINCETON surprises of the season, for up to the time the 
two teams met Princeton's star had been in 
the ascendant. From the very beginning it was evident, however, that 
Yale was much better than had been expected, and while Princeton 
scored first through a field kick goal, it was evident to all the spec- 
tators that there was no great disparity between the two teams. 
Yale's attack, if anything, grew the more effective. The wind was 
a disturbing feature, and each side was under the necessity of 
working very hard when playing against it with a sort of hopeless- 
ness. However, they handled the situation well. After some dis- 
appointments Yale got started towards Princeton's goal, and, by a 
very pretty forward pass worked by Howe and Kilpatrick, a touchdown 
was secured, which ended the scoring at 5 to 3 and settled the game 
in Yale's favor. 

MICHIGAN This game was, of course, the principal 

MINNESOTA game of the Middle West, and was looked 
ov forward tQ wlth the greatest of interest. Min- 

nesota had been cutting a wide swath and defeating her opponents 
with large scores, while Michigan had been an erratic team and at 
no time till the Pennsylvania game had shown her full strength. 
General belief rather favored Minnesota, but when the two teams 
met it was nip and tuck, and looked very much toward the end like 
a tie, similar to the Michigan-Pennsylvania game. With only a few 
minutes to play, however, Michigan worked two effective forward 
passes which carried the ball down within easy striking distance. 
Then with a couple of plunges they put it over, thus scoring a touch- 
down, which was converted into a goal and a victory, 6 to 0. 



1 ,'••• 






ft 


■f"-l1 







%„• * 



i # 



1, Martin; 2, Steele; 3, O'Coimell; 4, Grimm; 5, Gettemy; G, Marshall; 7, 
Rankin; 8, Whitehill ; 9, Gray; 10, Hannah; 11, McDowell; 12. McClure; 13, 
Peirce; 14, Forsythe; 15, Holrten; 16. Tibbens; 17, Cunningham; 18, Ingham, 
Capt.; 19, Moody; 20, Wallace; 21, Morrow, Coach. 

WASHINGTON AND JEFFERSON COLLEGE. 




CARNEGIE TECHNICAL SCHOOL. PITTSBURG, TA. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 45 

MICHIGAN Michigan fought out the issue with Pennsyl- 

PENNSYLVANIA van * a * n a m ost exciting contest, in which 
both teams had chances to score, but remark- 
able defensive work proved too strong for the attack, and neither 
got across the goal line of the other nor succeeded in getting a kick 
over the bar. The Michigan captain, Benbrook, did splendid work, 
as did Cozens, the Pennsylvania center, and the entire Pennsylvania 
back-field. In fact, the individual work of the men on both teams 
was remarkably clever. 



ANNAPOLIS The Army and Navy worked steadily through 

WEST POINT consistent seasons for their main game. An- 
napolis was unscored on, while the Army was 
scored on by both Yale and Harvard, but the Army ■ defeated Yale 
9 to 3, and their schedule was the harder. Both teams had good 
men, but sacrificed a bit of team work to individual stars. Hence, 
when they came down to Philadelphia on Saturdav. November 26, 
the interest was intense, and there was very little to tell which 
way the game would break. As a matter of fact, generalship proved 
the greater factor, the Navy winning by 3 to 0, a kick from place- 
ment by Dalton. 



PENNSYLVANIA Cornell had the satisfaction of scoring on 
PORNFI I Harvard and breaking the old tie with Chicago 

w^nnicuL. by defeating the western team 18 to 0. Ober- 

lin held them to a to score earlier in the season. When they 
came down to Philadelphia for their final game with Pennsylvania 
on Thanksgiving Day very little was known about them except that 
they had been working hard. Pennsylvania, on the other hand, had 
an experienced team that had gone through a gruelling tie with 
Michigan and were prepared to do or die. The game, however, found 
neither team at its best, but was an interesting contest, owing to 
the fact that the Cornell quarter did some excellent kicking. Penn- 
sylvania was too strong for them in the running game, and scored 
12 points, but Cornell succeeded in getting the ball over Pennsyl- 
vania's goal bar through field kicks twice, this making the final 
score 12 to 6. 



PRINCETON Princeton had been showing a steady and 

DARTMOUTH consistent development, and although Dart- 
mouth was known to be strong, the Prince- 
ton adherents felt that on merit their team would be able to hold 
the sturdy New Englanders, and so it proved. Although the game 
was close, the brilliant running of Pendleton for Princeton bothered 
Dartmouth a great deal and finally resulted in a victory for Princeton 
by the score of 6 to 0. 

HARVARD This game was played at Cambridge, and, 

CORNELL although Cornell succeeded in scoring, the con- 

test was one-sided, and for that reason some- 
what lacking in interest. Harvard was altogether too strong in the 
rushing game, and defeated the Ithacans 27 to 5. But it proved a 
good experience for Cornell, who in the final game of the season 
fought all the better for this severe defeat. 



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SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 47 

PRINCETON Princeton had the usual hard time with her 

LAFAYETTE Easton visitors and only managed to squeak 

■-** r ** 1&l out a victory by a field kick goal. Lafayette 

was unable to score, although playing a strong defensive game. 



MINNESOTA Minnesota had been MINNESOTA 

CHICAGO gaining ground all the WISCONSIN 

w v wv season, while Chicago *wi«wwrwic« 

and Wisconsin, too, for that matter, seemed hopelessly riding for 
a fall. Neither of these games, therefore, offered any especial in- 
terest, as they were too one-sided, Minnesota being far and away 
too strong for either of the rival teams, defeating Chicago 24 to 
and Wisconsin 28 to 0. 




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SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



49 



Games Since Introduction of Rugby 
Foot Ball 

Where two frames have been played in one season, only the championship grama 

is given. 



YALE— HARVARD. 



1876— Yale, 1 goal; Harvard, 2 touch- 
downs. 
1877— No game. 
1878— Yale, 1 goal; Harvard, 0. 
1879*— Yale, 2 safeties; Harvard, 4 

1880— Yale, 1 goal 1 touchdown; Har- 
vard, 0. 

1881— Yale, safeties; Harvard, 4 
safeties. 

1882— Yale, 1 goal 3 touchdowns; Har- 
vard, 2 safeties. 

1883— Yale, 4 goals; Harvard, 1 touch- 
down 1 safety. 

1884— Yale, 6 goals 4 touchdowns; 
Harvard, 0. 

1885— No game. 

1886- Yale, 5 goals; Harvard, 1 touch- 
down. 

1887— Yale, 3 goals 1 safety; Harvard, 
1 goal. 

1888— No game. 



1889— Yale, 1 goal; Harvard, 0. 
1890— Harvard, 2 goals; Yale, 1 goal. 
1891— Yale, 1 goal 1 touchdown; Har- 
vard, 0. 
1892— Yale, 1 goal; Harvard, 0. 
1893— Yale, 1 goal; Harvard, 0. 
1894— Yale. 12; Harvard, 4. 
1895-6— No game. 
1897— Yale, 0; Harvard, 0. 
1898— Harvard, 17; Yale, 0. 
1899-Yale, 0; Harvard. 0. 
1900— Yale, 28; Harvard. 0. 
1901— Harvard, 22; Yale. 0. 
1902— Yale, 23; Harvard, 0. 
1903— Yale, 16; Harvard, 0. 
1904— Yale, 12; Harvard, 0. 
1905— Yale, 6; Harvard, 0. 
1906— Yale, 6; Harvard, 0. 
1907— Yale, 12; Harvard, 0. 
1908- Harvard, 4; Yale, 0. 
1909— Yale, 8; Harvard, 0. 
1910— Yale, 0; Harvard, 0. 



PRINCETON— YALE. 



1876— Yale, 2 goals; Princeton, 0. 
1877 — Yale, 2 touchdowns; Princeton, 0. 
1878— Princeton, 1 goal; Yale, 0. 
1879— Yale, 2 safeties; Princeton, 5 

1880— Yale, 5 safeties; Princeton, 11 

1881— Yale, 0; Princeton, 0. 

1882— Yale, 2 goals 1 safety; Prince- 
ton, 1 goal 1 safety. 

1883— Yale, 1 goal; Princeton, 0. 

1884— Yale, 1 goal; Princeton, 1 touch- 
down. 

1885 — Princeton, 1 goal from touch- 
down; Yale, 1 goal from field. 

1886— Yale, 1 touchdown; Princeton, 0. 

1887— Yale, 2 goals; Princeton, 0. 

1888— Yale, 2 goals; Princeton, 0. 

1889— Prin., 1 goal 1 touchdown; Yale.O. 

ffi90— Yale, 32 points; Princeton, 0. 



1891— Yale, 2 goals 2 touch.; Prin.. 0, 
1892— Yale, 2 goals; Princeton, 0. 
1893— Princeton, 1 goal; Yale, 0. 
1894— Yale, 24; Princeton, 0. 
1895— Yale, 20; Princeton, 10. 
1896— Princeton, 24; Yale, 61 
1897— Yale, 6; Princeton, 0. 
1898— Princeton, 6; Yale, 0. 
1899— Princeton, 11; Yale, 10. 
1900— Yale, 29; Princeton, 5. 
1901— Yale, 12; Princeton, 0. 
1902— Yale, 12; Princeton, 5. 
1903-Princeton. 11; Yale, 6. 
1904- Yale, 12; Princeton, 0. 
1905— Yale, 23; Princeton, 4. 
1906— Yale, 0; Princeton, 0. 
1907- Yale, 12; Princeton, 10. 
1908— Yale, 11; Princeton, 6. 
1909— Yale, 17; Princeton, 0. 
1910— Yale, 5; Princeton, 3. 



* Tie game; safeties not counted in scoring. 




1, Tammany, Asst. Mgr.; 2, Handy; 3, Lind; 4, Ayerst; 5, Carswell; 6, 
Marshall, Mgr.; 7, R. Taylor; 8. Spruance; 9, Todd; 10, E. Loomis; 11, Dean; 
12, Walls; 13, Stay ton; 14, Millington; 15, Hamel; 16. Downs; 17, C. Taylor, 
Capt. ; 18, Davis; 19, McAvoy, Coach; 20, Groff; 21, Gwilliain: 22, Behen; 
23, Cann; 24, Attix; 25, Huston; 26, S. Loomis; 27, Ennis; 28, Sawin; 29, 
Kidd. DELAWARE COLLEGE, NEWARK, DEL. Brown, Photo. 




1, Cordray, Coach; 2. Clarke. Grad. Mgr.; 3, Brumbaugh; 4, Tyson; 5, Miles; 
6, Hodgson; 7, Jacobs; 8, Baker, Student Mgr.; 9, Ferrel; 10, Bastian; 11, 
Groscup; 12, Babcock, Capt.; 13, Lucas; 14, Prindle; 15, Simmons; 16, 
Anderson; 17, Brubaker; 18, Glosser; 19, Shannon. 

WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



51 



PRINCETON 

1876— No game. 

1877— Harvard, 1 goal 1 touchdown; 
Princeton, 1 touchdown. 

1878— Princeton, 1 touchdown; Har- 
vard, 0. 

1879— Princeton, 1 goal 1 safety; 
Harvard, 5 safeties. 

1880— Princeton, 2 goals 2 touchdowns 
6 safeties; Harvard, 1 goal 1 touch- 
down 4 safeties. 

1881— Princeton, 1 safety; Harvard, 1 
safety. 



—HARVARD. 

1882— Harvard, 1 goal 1 touchdown; 

Princeton, 1 goal. 
1883— Prin., 26 points; Har., 7 points. 
1884 — Prin., 34 points; Har., 6 points. 
1885— No game. 

1886— Princeton, 12 points; Harvard. 0. 
1887— Harvard, 12 points; Princeton, 0. 
1888 — Princeton, 18 points; Harvard, 6. 
1889— Princeton, 41 points; Harvard, 15. 
1890-1-2-3-4— No game. 
1895— Princeton, 12; Harvard, 4. 
1896— Princeton, 12; Harvard, 0. 
1897 to 1910— No game. 



UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA— HARVARD. 



1881— Harvard, 2 goals 2 touchdowns; 

Pennsylvania, 6 safeties. 
1883— Harvard, 4; U. of P., 0. 
1884— U. of P., 4; Harvard. 0. 
1885— No game. 
1886— Harvard, 28; U. of P., 0. 
1888— Harvard, 50; U. of P., 0. 
1890— Harvard, 35; U. of P., 4. 
1893— Harvard, 26; U. of P., 4. 
1894— U. of P., 18; Harvard, 4. 
1895— U. of P., 17; Harvard, 14. 



1896— U. of P., 8; Harvard, 6. 
1897— U. of P., 15; Harvard, 6. 
1898— Harvard, 10; U. of P., 0. 
1899— Harvard, 16; U. of P., 0. 
1900— Harvard, 17; U. of P., 5. 
1901— Harvard, 33; U. of P., 6. 
1902— Harvard, 11; U. of P., 0. 
1903— Harvard, 17; U. of P., 10. 
1904-U. of P., 11; Harvard, 0. 
1905— U. of P., 12; Harvard, 6. 
1906 to 1910 -No game. 



UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA— YALE. 



1879— Y., 3 goals 5 touchdowns; U. of P., 0. 
1880— Y., 8 goals 1 touchdown; U. of P., 0. 
1885— Yale, 4 goals 7 touchdowns; U. of 

P., 1 goal 2 safeties. 
1S86— Y„ 8 goals 7 touchdowns; U. of P., 0. 
1887— Yale, 6 goals 3 touchdowns; U. of 

P.. 1 safety. 



1888— Yale, 50 points; U. of P., 0. 
1889— Yale, 20 points; U. of P.. 10 points. 
1890— Yale, 60 points; U. of P., 0. 
1891— Yale, 48 points; U. of P., 0. 
1892— Yale, 28 points; U. of P., 0. 
1893— Yale, 14 points; U. of P., 6. 
1894 to 1910-No game. 



UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA-PRINCETON. 



1876— Princeton, 6 goals; U. of P., 0. 
1878 — Princeton, 2 goals 4 touchdowns; 

U. of P., 0. 
1879— Princeton, 6 goals 4 touchdowns; 

U. of P., 11 safeties. 
1880— Princeton, 1 goal 3 safeties; U. 

of P., 1 safety. 
1881 — Princeton 4 goals 6 touchdowns; 

U. of P., 4 safeties. 
1882— Princeton, 10 goals 4 touchdowns; 

U. of P., 0. 
1883— Prin., 39 points; U. of P., 6 points. 



1884— Princeton, 30 points; U. of P., 0. 
1885— Princeton, 51 points; U. of P., 0, 
1886— Prin., 28 points; U. of P., 6 points. 
1887— Princeton, 95 points; U. of P., 0. 
1888— Princeton, 4 points; U. of P., 0. 
1889— Prin., 72 points; U. of P., 4 points. 
1890— Princeton, 6 points; U. of P., 0. 
1891— Princeton, 24 points; U. of P., 0. 
1892— U. of P., 6 points: Princeton, 4 
1893— Princeton, 4 points; U. of P., a 
1894-U. of P., 12; Princeton, 0. 
1895 to 1910-No game. 



UNIVERSITY OF 
1893-U. of P.. 50; Cornell, 0. 
1894-U. of P., 6; Cornell, 0. 
1895-U. of P., 46; Cornell. 2. 
1896-U. of P.. 32; Cornell. 10. 
1897-U. of P.. 4; Cornell, 0. 
1898-U. of P., 12; Cornell 6. 
1899-U. of P., 29; Cornell, 6. 
1900-U. of P., 27; Cornell, 0, 
1901-Comell, 24; U. of P., 6. 



PENNSYLVANIA-CORNELL. 

1902-U. of P., 12; Cornell, 11. 
1903-U. of P., 36; Cornell, 0. 
1904-U. of P., 34; Cornell, 0. 
1905-U. of P., 6; Cornell, 5. 
1906-U. of P., 0; Cornell, 0. 
1907-U. of P., 12; Cornell, 4. 
1908-U. of P., 17; Cornell, 4. 
1909-U. of P., 17; Cornell, 6. 
1910— U. of P.. 12; Cornell, 6. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



63 



ARMY-NAVY. 

1890— Navy. 24; Army, 0. 1903— Army, 40; Navy, 5. 

1891— Army, 32; Navy. 16. 1904— Army. 11; Navy, 0. 

1892— Navy. 12; Army, 4. 1905— Army, 6; Navy, 6. 

1893— Navy, 6; Army, 4. 1906— Navy, 10; Army, 0. 

1899— Army, 17; Navy, 5. 1907— Navy, 6; Army, 0. 

1900— Navy, 11; Army, 7. 1908- Army, 6; Navy, 4. 

1901— Army, 11; Navy, 5. 1909-No game. 

1902— Army, 22; Navy, 8. 1910— Navy, 3; Army, 0. 



1888-Harvard, 74; 
1889— Harvard, 38; 
icon /Harvard, 43; 
1890 (Harvard, 64; 
1QQ1 /Harvard, 0; 
1W1 (Harvard, 16; 
iqqo /Harvard, 16; 
lbad (Harvard, 36; 
1895— Harvard, 4; 
1897-Harvard, 13; 
1898-Harvard, 21; 



HARVARD- 
Dartmouth, 0. 
Dartmouth, 0. 
Dartmouth, 0. 
Dartmouth, 0. 
Dartmouth, 0. 
Dartmouth, 0. 
Dartmouth, 0. 
Dartmouth, 0. 
Dartmouth, 0. 
Dartmouth, 0. 
Dartmouth, 0. 



DARTMOUTH. 
1899-Harvard, 11; 
1901— Harvard, 27; 
1902-Harvard, 16; 
1903— Dartmouth, 
1904— Harvard. 0; 
1905— Harvard, 6; 
1906— Harvard, 22; 
1907— Dartmouth, 
1908— Harvard, 6; 
1909— Harvard, 12; 
1910— Harvard, 18; 



; Dartmouth, 0. 
; Dartmouth, 12. 
; Dartmouth, 6. 
11; Harvard, 0. 
; Dartmouth, 0. 
; Dartmouth, 6. 
; Dartmouth, 9. 
22; Harvard, 0. 
Dartmouth, 0. 
; Dartmouth, 3. 
; Dartmouth, 0. 



1894— Brown, 20; 
1895— Brown, 10; 
1896— Brown, 10; 
1897— No game. 
1898— Brown, 12; 
1899— Brown, 16; 
1900— Brown, 17; 



BROWN 
Dartmouth, 4. 
Dartmouth, 5. 
Dartmouth, 10. 

Dartmouth, 0. 
Dartmouth, 5. 
Dartmouth, 5. 



-DARTMOUTH. 

1901— Dartmouth, 22; Brown, 0. 
1902— Dartmouth, 12; Brown, 6. 
1903— Dartmouth, 62; Brown, 0. 
1904— Dartmouth, 12; Brown, 5. 
1905— Dartmouth, 24; Brown, 6. 
1906— Brown, 23; Dartmouth, 0. 
190T to 1910— No grame. 



CHICAGO— WISCONSIN. 



1894— Wisconsin, 30; Chicago, 0. 
1895— Chicago, 22; Wisconsin, 12. 
1896— Wisconsin, 24; Chicago, 0. 
1897— Wisconsin, 23; Chicago, 8. 
1898— Chicago, 6; Wisconsin, 0. 
1899— Chicago, 17; Wisconsin, 0. 
1900— Wisconsin, 39; Chicago, 5. 
1901— Wisconsin, 35; Chicago, 0. 



1902— Chicago, 11; Wisconsin. 0. 
1903— Chicago, 15; Wisconsin, 6. 
1904— Chicago, 18; Wisconsin, 11. 
1905— Chicago, 4; Wisconsin, 0. 
1906-7— No game. 
1908- Chicago, 18; Wisconsin, 12. 
1909- Chicago, 6; Wisconsin, 6. 
1910— Wisconsin, 10; Chicago, 0. 



CHICAGO- 
1892— Michigan, 18; Chicago, 10. 
1QQ o /Chicago, 10; Michigan, 6. 
105W (Michigan, 28; Chicago, 10. 
1894— Michigan, 6; Chicago, 4. 
1895— Michigan, 12; Chicago, 0. 
1896— Chicago. 7; Michigan, 6. 
1897— Chicago, 21; Michigan, 12. 
1898— Michigan, 12; Chicago, 11. 



MICHIGAN. 
1899— No game. 

1900- Chicago, 15; Michigan, 6. 
1901— Michigan. 22; Chicago, 0. 
1902— Michigan, 21; Chicago, 0. 
1903— Michigan, 28; Chicago, 0. 
1904— Michigan, 22; Chicago, 12. 
1905— Chicago. 2; Michigan. 0. 
1906 to 1910— No »ame. 



WISCONSIN 
1892— Michigan, 10; Wisconsin, 6. 
1893— Wisconsin, 34; Michigan, 18. 
1894-5-6-7-8— No game. 
1899— Wisconsin, 17; Michigan, 5. 
1900-1— No game. 



■MICHIGAN. 
1902— Michigan, 6; Wisconsin, 0. 
1903— Michigan. 16; Wisconsin, 0. 
1904— Michigan. 28; Wisconsin. 0. 
1905— Michigan, 12; Wisconsin, 0. 
1906 to 1910— No ram*. 




1, Ainslee; 2, Linden 3, Prindle: 4, Michael; 5, Perry: 
8, Peterson; 9. Stevens; 10, Winter; 11. Mason; 12. 
Walker; 14. Hale: 15. YanGorder- 16. Cook. 

WILLIAMS COLLEGE. 




1, Kelly; 2, Courleux; 3, Swenson; 4, Schroeder; 5, Collings; 6, Dr. J. H. 
McCurdy, Coach; 7, Deaver: 8, Smethurst, Mgr. ; 9, Briggs; 10, Ireland, Asst. 
Mgr. ; 11, Home; 12. Howard; 13, Delahanty, Capt. ; 14, Martin; 15, Merner; 
10, Gregory; 17, Watson; 18. Metzler. 

SPRINGFIELD (MASS.) Y.M.C.A. TRAINING SCHOOL. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



o5 



1890— Minnesota, 
1891— Minnesota. 
1892 — Minnesota, 
1893— Minnesota, 
1894 — Wisconsin, 
1895 — Minnesota, 
1896— Wisconsin, 
1897— Wisconsin, 
1898— Wisconsin, 
1899— Wisconsin, 
1990— Minnesota, 



MINNESOTA 
63; Wisconsin, 0. 
26; Wisconsin, 12. 
32; Wisconsin, 4. 
40; Wisconsin, 0. 
6; Minnesota, 0. 
14; Wisconsin, 10. 
6: Minnesota, 0. 
39; Minnesota, 0. 
28; Minnesota, 0. 
19; Minnesota, 0. 
6; Wisconsin, 5. 



-WISCONSIN. 

1901— Wisconsin, 18; 
1902— Minnesota, 11; 
1903— Minnesota, 17; 
1904— Minnesota, 28; 
1905— Wisconsin, 16; 
1906— No game. 
1907— Minnesota, 17; 
1908— Wisconsin, 5; 
1909— Minnesota, 34; 
1910— Minnesota, 28; 



Minnesota, 0. 
Wisconsin, 0. 
Wisconsin, 0. 
Wisconsin, 0. 
Minnesota, 12. 

Wisconsin, 17. 
Minnesota, 0. 
Wisconsin, 6. 
Wisconsin, 0. 



CHICAGO- 
1895— Minnesota, 10; Chicago. 6. 
1896-7-8— No game. 
1399— Chicago, 29; Minnesota, 0. 
1900 — Chicago. 6; Minnesota, 6. 
1901-2-3-4-5— No game. 



MINNESOTA. 

1906— Minnesota, 4; Chicago, 2. 
1907— Chicago. 18; Minnesota. 12. 
1908— Chicago, 29; Minnesota, 0. 
1909— Minnesota, 20; Chicago, 6. 
1910— Minnesota, 24; Chicago, 0. 



OREGON 
1900— Oregon, 43; Washington, 0. 
1901-2— No game. 
1903— Washington, 6; Oregon, 5. 
1904— Oregon, 18; Washington, 0. 
1905— Oregon. 12; Washington. 12. 



-WASHINGTON. 

1906— Oregon. 16; Washington, 6. 
1907— Oregon, 6; Washington, 0. 
1908— Washington, 15; Oregon, 0. 
1909— Washington, 20; Oregon, 6. 
1910— No game. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 57 



Review of the Western Conference 
Season of 1910 

By Walter H. Eckersall. 

Not since the rules were changed so radically in 1905-06 has the 
Central West enjoyed such a successful foot ball season as the one 
which has just passed into history, and no more fitting climax could 
be conceived than the game in which Michigan lowered the colors of 
Minnesota in a contest which was featured by bitterly fought and 
spectacular playing throughout. 

All during the season the teams in the Conference and Michigan, 
which withdrew from the organization in 1906, played a brand of foot 
ball which was exceedingly interesting, and games were won by use 
of plays made possible by the modifications of the rules, which resulted 
in the forward pass being made one of the most important factors in 
foot ball. It is not necessary to add that all these games were won 
on their merits, with only one possible exception, but as results stand, 
as far as the relative merits of the contenders in all branches of 
athletic competition are concerned, it is not necessary in this article 
to make excuses cr allowances for results of any contests. 

It has been the contention of most followers of foot ball that if the 
present rules were allowed to stand long enough the various coaches 
gradually would advance the game to a scientific basis, where it 
would be every bit as interesting as the old style. The main fault 
with the game in this section, that is, considering it from the spec- 
tators' standpoint, concerned the constant changing of rules, which 
deprived the average layman of learning them intelligently enough to 
get an idea of what was going on and what the different penalties 
were levied for. So many alterations have been made in the forward 
pass that the average follower of the popular college sport has been 
unable to keep track of the different rules and intelligently under- 
stand the code which governs a play, which has become a great factor 
in foot ball. 

Among the Conference colleges, a situation existed which was per- 
plexing, and the title of Conference champion could not be awarded 
to one institution without offending the other. Minnesota and Illinois 
went through the season without a defeat by a Conference eleven, 
although the Gophers were humbled in their last match, which was 
the most important of the season. Illinois met and defeated some of 
the strongest elevens in the Conference, and although some of its 
games were won through the ability of one player to kick goals from 
the field, the fact remains that Illinois was victorious in every contest 
and certainly deserved all the honor and credit which can be bestowed 
upon it. 

Minnesota met and defeated Chicago decisively, and this was the 
only team that Illinois met which played Minnesota. The Gophers 
won from the Maroons by a larger score than Illinois, but it would 
be unfair to rank teams by the comparative score basis, and the only 
just means of ranking these powerful elevens is to place them on 
even terms for the Conference title. Illinois had its most successful 
season since 1895, and in the intervening years the Orange and Blue 
elevens have met with disastrous defeats, while on the other hand 
they have played some very close contests, but in none of these 




1, Kirkpatrick, Mgr. : 2. Wright; 3, Blain; 4, Powell; 5, H. Jones, Coach; 
6, Olds; 7. Baekman; 8, Raymond: 9, Farrell, Trainer; 10, Smith; 11, Mark- 
ley; 12, Boesel; 13, Egbert; 14, Wells, Capt. ; 15, Laybourn; 16, Hall; 17, 
Barreklow; 18, Pary; 19, Clare; 20, Summers; 21, Foss; 22, Long; 23, 
Schubert; 24. Smith; 25. Cox. 

OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY. COLUMBUS. OHIO. 




1, Webster; 2, Cox, Mgr. ; 3, Brown; 4, Liggett; 5, Tope; 6, Benner; 7, 
Patton; 8, Johnston; 9, Miller. Coach; 10. Alburt; 11, Palmer; 12, Canaga, 
Capt.; 13, Nixon; 14, Myers; 15. Ilibbs; 10, Donley; 17, Prof. T. E. Trott, 
Fac. Mgr. f gci0 (0III0) COLLEGE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 59 

instances has a single excuse been heard from the home of the State 
university. 

It was this true spirit of sportsmanship which has won for Illinois 
a warm place in the hearts of Western followers of collegiate ath- 
letics, and it seemed only fair to such a team to award it what was 
justly due. Illinois had a good team, one which was stronger defen- 
sively than offensively, and it would have taken an eleven with a 
mighty powerful attack to have scored upon the down-staters. In 
the Conference, Illinois met and defeated Chicago, Indiana, North- 
western and Purdue, while Syracuse was defeated in a close game 
and Drake and James Millikin taken into camp by decisive scores. 

As Illinois played four Conference games and Minnesota met only 
two institutions in the organization, Illinois was all the more deserv- 
ing of an even break in the ranking. Minnesota won easily from 
Chicago and Wisconsin, but the latter institutions were represented 
by their weakest elevens in years. The Gophers had a powerful 
aggregation, one which would have been a worthy opponent for any 
team in the country. Minnesota was represented by players who 
combined weight with sreed, and it had such a varied assortment of 
plays that only a wide-awake and powerful defense could successfully 
cope with its onslaughts. 

Another Conference institution which was represented by an excep- 
tionally strong eleven, one which was considered to be the strongest 
in the' history of the institution, was Indiana. Under the tutelage 
of Coach James M. Sheldon, the Hoosiers formed an aggregation 
which was nearly the equal of any in the Western organization, and 
in one of its most important games (the one with Illinois), Sheldon's 
eleven went down in defeat by virtue of a single goal kick from the 
toe of Otto Seiler, who won three games for the Orange and Blue 
eleven by the same means. 

Indiana had a team composed mostly of veterans with two years' 
experience, and it had one of the best open and versatile attacks of 
any team in the West. The forward pass was employed in all con- 
tests for good gains and the players had mastered this play to a fine 
point of perfection. Sheldon had several individual players who 
lielped the team considerably in its most important games, but it was 
not so much the individualism as it was superb team playing that 
brought about Indiana's successful season. 

Chicago, Wisconsin and Purdue were represented by teams below 
their standards, while Northwestern and Iowa made better showings 
than in any year since the new rules were adopted. Lack of material 
was responsible more than anything else for the poor showing of the 
Maroons, Badgers and Boilermakers, while the Purple and Hawkeye 
institutions should be represented by even better elevens this coming 
season. In this connection it is necessary to state that both of the 
latter colleges were coached by new men in Western foot ball circles, 
Hammett having charge at Northwestern and Hawley at Iowa. 

Michigan's absence from Conference competition was missed just the 
same as in years since it withdrew, and although the Wolverines' 
game with Minnesota afforded followers of foot ball a chance to see 
these powerful aggregations combat with each other, the absence of 
games with. Chicago and Wisconsin was felt, and it will take a long 
time to restore the interest in foot ball which has waned since 
Michigan pulled away from the Conference, at the expense of which 
teams it has won its country-wide athletic reputation. 

Since it has withdrawn from the Conference Michigan's athletic 
teams have been competing in different sections of the country with 
a lot of success, and as long as successful seasons can be experienced 
by meeting athletic teams outside of the Conference, it is doubtful if 
the Wolverines ever will submit to Conference rulings and return to 



7 ' ' " 



1, Vanlioak, Asst. Mgr.; 2, Beshort; 3. Brown; 4, Dimn; 5, Richmond; 6, 
Thompson, Mgr.; 7, Boell; 8, Cook: 9. Felton. Cant.: 10, Hertzler; 11, 
MacGregor; 12, Wise; 13, Miller; 14, Stafford; 15, Halloway. 
DICKINSON COLLEGE, CARLISLE, TA. 









~<f$m 



■:''■'*'■ 



1, Gardner; 2, Speers; 3, Hnbbel : 4, Shenk: 5. Ball; 6. Conell ; 7, Ewing, 
Mgr.; 8, Hammond; 9, Pegram: 10, Thomas: 11, Boyd; 12, Baker; 13, E. 
Waller; 14, Emmons; 45, H. Waller; 10. Phillips. 

PRINCETON FRESHMEN. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 61 

the fold. For two years, Michigan has defeated Minnesota in foot 
ball, the first time in 1909, when the Gophers were acknowledged to 
be Conference champions, and last year, when Minnesota was one of 
the strongest in the organization. In 1909 Michigan won from Penn- 
sylvania and last year held the Quakers to a tie score, when Penn 
was acknowledged to have one of the strongest elevens in the East. 

Last season Michigan had one of the most versatile attacks of any 
eleven in the country, and it was the variation of the Wolverine 
offense which was responsible for its tie game with Pennsylvania and 
its victory over Minnesota. With a line which was well able to take 
care of any plays sent at it, Coach Yost was in a position to arrange 
his defense so that almost any kind of plays sprung by opposing 
elevens were checked without continuous gains. 

Against Pennsylvania, Michigan presented an almost impenetrable 
stone wall, and time after time the hard driving Quakers were tackled 
with such force that the runner was knocked back instead of coming 
forward a yard or two, as is generally the case. This, happened not 
only once but many times, while the Wolverine forwards had so 
much charge and dash in their work that Penn was not able to gain 
consistently by use of hammering formations. In this memorable 
contest the superb kicking of quarter-back Scott of Pennsylvania was 
one of the Easterners' strongest points, and the peculiar manner in 
which this player drove the ball down the field and away from the 
Michigan players who were back to receive the oval, was one of the 
numerous plays which Penn depended upon for an ultimate victory. 

Several times during the battle Pennsylvania recovered the ball on 
Scott's kicks, so proficient were the Quakers in following the ball, 
but in this department of the game they did not have much on the 
Western players, who followed the oval with unerring accuracy and, 
like their worthy opponents, they recovered the ball several times on 
Thomson's kicks. Each eleven had one or more chances to win from 
the other, but fate had destined the game to result in a scoreless tie, 
and no matter how hard those warriors tried to win for their respec- 
tive institutions, their efforts were unavailing, and when the final 
whistle blew, each eleven thought it had outplayed the other, but the 
consensus of opinion among unbiased critics was that Michigan had 
the better of the stubbornly-fought battle. 

Elated over their showing against the strong Pennsylvania eleven, 
the Wolverines boarded the train that night for Ann Arbor, where, on 
the following Saturday, they were to give battle to Minnesota, a 
team which had swept everything before it in decisive manner, one 
which many persons thought would win from Michigan. In the week 
before that game, Coach Yost evolved plays, worked them up to a 
high point of proficiency, and, when they were used in the game, 
they worked with clock-like precision. 

Almost on the eve of that great battle Michigan was compelled to 
leave one of its star players, full-back Thomson, out of the game 
because of a technicality, as Thomson was a special student and a 
Conference rule prohibited the playing of such men. Michigan with- 
out a murmur substituted Lawton. Thus Yost was compelled to 
make a shift at the last minute, and Lawton was awarded the position 
and the added responsibility of doing all the kicking. 

All season Yost had sent scouts to watch Minnesota in action. 
During the week which preceded the game Michigan was drilled to 
etop the Gopher formations, which were taught to the scrubs who 
were sent against the 'varsity eleven in scrimmage. A special defense 
was evolved for every offensive which Minnesota sprung, with the 
(result that the Gophers were unable to make consistent headway. 
Allowances must be made for the fact that Minnesota traveled a long 
way to play the game, while Michigan had the benefit of playing on 




1, Kimbro; 2, Pei-rings; 3, Nelson; 4, McCarthy; 5, Banks; 6, Norvell ; 7, 
Barnes; 8, Woods; 9, Stevens, Mgr.; 10, Burger; 11, Sinler; 12, Cayou, 
Coach; 13, Falvey; 14, Morell; 15, Harting, Capt. ; 16. Lane; 17, Vollmar; 
18. Abeken. 

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY, ST. LOUIS, MO. 




I, Cameron. Mgr.; 2, W. Johnston, Coach: 3, A. Coinpton; 4. W. Compton; 
5, Baker; 6. Miller; 7, Yohannon; 8, Hackett: 9. McSweeny; 10. Wevgandt; 

II, Mackintosh; 12. Evans; 13, Avison; 14. Kilpatrick; 15. K. Johnson; 16, 
Maurer; 17, White; 18, 0. Johnson; 19, Elder. Capt.; 20, Collins; 21, Kohr. 

UNIVERSITY OF WOOSTER. WOOSTER. OHIO. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 63 

Its own field and before its own following, who flocked to Ann Arbor 
from all sections of the West. 

The secret of Michigan's ability to cope successfully with Minne- 
sota's offensive tactics was the peculiar defense which Yost had 
taught his linemen. It will be remembered that Minnesota had a 
peculiar formation, in which the tackles were pulled out of their 
positions and stationed back of the line. When a signal was given 
these tackles would shift to one side or the other and the play 
invariably was sent on the strong side. Instead of allowing his line- 
men time to set themselves, as is generally the case, Yost had his 
forwards stand up and watch the tackles all the time. When it was 
seen to which side these tackles were going to shift, the Michigan 
line would shift a position and then assume its defensive plan. In 
this way most of Minnesota's plays were checked, although several 
were successful for good gains. The fact that quarter-back McGovern 
was used as a sort of shifting player did not worry Michigan, as the 
players had a good idea who was going to carry the ball, and the 
Wolverine defensive strength was concentrated on this player. 

After the game the Michigan scouts said that Minnesota's offensive 
playing was little different from what had been used all season, and 
it was not until Michigan registered its score that the Gophers tried 
a single forward pass. On the other hand the Wolverines tried 
several, some of which were successful, but there was a vast differ- 
ence between the tactics of the two elevens. 

In the first quarter Minnesota had the best of the playing, as the 
ball was in Michigan's territory most of the time, and in this period 
the Gophers scored a touchdown, but the play was not allowed. With 
the ball close to its goal in Michigan's possession, the punt signal 
was given and Lawton dropped back to boot the oval out of danger. 
Although the pass was perfect, Lawton must have thought he was 
practising or the score was about 100 to in his team's favor, for 
he took so much time that left tackle Walker of Minnesota broke 
through and blocked the attempt. As the ball bounded back from his 
chest it struck umpire Hinkey, and then a Minnesota player took it 
up and ran the remaining few yards for a touchdown. Under the 
rule, a ball which strikes an official must be played over again, and, 
as a result, Minnesota's touchdown was not allowed. 

The teams fought with all the physical power they possessed during 
the second and third quarters, and in these periods Michigan had a 
slight advantage. In the fourth and last session the climax came in 
two of the prettiest plays which possibly could be imagined and 
which resulted in Michigan scoring a touchdown and registering the 
customary goal-kick. When the period was about ten minutes old, 
Michigan finally took possession of the ball near the center of the 
field and off to one side. Then one of the plays which had been 
saved up as a last effort to win was signalled for. When quarter- 
back McMillan gave the signal, right end Wells dropped back about 
eight or ten yards from his position. The other end, Borleske, 
adjusted himself so that he could get out in the open without being 
molested, while the backs formed a peculiar position. It was a 
deceptive-looking formation and the ball passed through at least three 
pairs of hands before it finally was passed to Wells, who threw it 
down the field to Borleske. 

By making a grand running leap and turning half way around, 
Borleske caught the oval at a point eighteen yards in advance of 
where it was put in play. Without a bit of hesitation and before 
some of the Minnesota .players knew what was coming off, the same 
play again was executed successfully. Borleske, after catching the 
oval, made a gallant effort to place it over the line, but he was 
stopped on the four-vard mark and about ten yards from the side line. 

At this point Wells, whom Yost claimed ^s the best line plunger 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 6S 

he ever saw, was pulled back from the end position to full-back and 
sent against the heavy Gopher line on the strong side of the field. 
His first attempt did not net any material gain, but the foot ball 
knowledge of Michigan was demonstrated on the next play, when 
Wells was sent through on the weak side, the one nearest the side 
line, and he planted the oval over the coveted chalk line, the touch- 
down spelling defeat for Minnesota and victory for Michigan. Conklin 
kicked the goal which made the score 6 to in favor of Michigan. 

Even after Michigan had this advantage Minnesota made a noble 
effort to tie the count by trying all the forward passes and trick 
plays which the team had been taught, but the Wolverines were not 
to be caught napping, and they either intercepted these forward 
passes or foiled the trick plays. Time was called shortly afterward 
and pandemonium reigned in the popular college town. 

But in those minutes of happiness the defeated warriors were not 
forgotten, and many a cheer was given for the gallant Gopher war- 
riors who tried so hard to uphold the honor and glory of the Old 
Gold and Maroon university. 

By this victory Michigan was proclaimed the champion of the 
West, but the fact that Illinois did not lose a game must be given 
consideration. Michigan had a powerful aggregation, one which was 
equally strong offensively and defensively, and the brand of foot ball 
which it played in its most important games entitles the Wolverines 
to be ranked among the strongest elevens in the country. The 
Wolverines played peculiar foot ball early in the season. The strength 
of the defense was apparent at all times, but for some reason the 
offense did not work with the perfection which means success. Case 
and Ohio State held Michigan to 3 to 3 scores, while the Michigan 
Agricultural College eleven gave Yost's eleven an awful scare, 
Michigan finally winning by a 6 to 3 count. 

But the team came back when everybody wanted it to, and it was 
improving the day after the Pennsylvania game. Individually and 
collectively it was a strong eleven, and it had some linemen who 
were the most versatile of any forwards who ever played the game 
in this section. The backs were fast and speedy, with the necessary 
power in their ground-gaining attempts to make some distance when 
opposition was met. 

Captain Benbrook and Wells, the right end, were selected by 
Walter Camp, who is considered to be the dean of American college 
foot ball critics, for his All-America eleven, it being the second con- 
secutive time that he has so honored Benbrook. Camp spoke well of 
the prowess of these players, but he did not fail to note the 
ability of another Western player who has been a star ever since he 
donned the moleskins. Walker of Minnesota was honored with one 
of the tackle positions, while Butzer of Illinois and McG.overn of 
Minnesota were others whose playing during the season won favorable 
comment from the noted authority. 

B3fore rating the Conference elevens, the playing of the other 
teams in this section entitles them to mention. The Michigan 
"Aggies" played consistently throughout the season and rightfully are 
entitled to the minor college championship of the Central West. Wabash 
College was represented with a powerful team, but was forced to 
discontinue the game in the middle of the season, owing to the unfor- 
tunate death of one of its players. Lake Forest, Illinois Wesleyan, 
Beloit and Lawrence were represented by elevens worthv of favorable 
comment. 

As stated before in this article, Minnesota and Illinois are placed 
on even terms for the Conference title, because each completed its 
Conference schedule without a defeat, although the consensus of 
opinion at the close of the season was that the Gophers were the 
stronger aggregation. 




1, Elden, Asst. Mgr. ; 2, Mowry; 3, Scott, Coach; 4, Dr. von den Steinen, 
Graduate Mgr.; 5, Pfau, Mgr.; 6, Knight; 7, Bonfield; 8, Lind; 9, Logee; 10, 
Portmann; 11, Grills; 12, Mowry; 13, Rafferty; 11, Wells; 15, Finlayson; 16, 
Owens; 17, Kagy, Capt.; 18, Hall; 19, Thomas; 20, Snider; 21, Barnes. 
WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. CLEVELAND. OHIO. 




L Hull, Trainer; 2, Kehoe; 3, Cravens; 4. Lee; 5, Winslow; 6, Weber, Coach; 
7, H. Fisher; 8, .Miller; 9, McLaughlin; 10, Drew; 11, Ramsey; 12, H. Voris; 
13, C. Voris; 14., R. Fisher; 15, Cobb; 16, P. Voris, Capt.; 17, Reynolds; 18, 



Vancil; 19* Mann. 



HANOVER (IND.) COLLEGE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 67 

Indiana is placed third in the rating, because it lost only one 
game in the Conference race, the defeat being suffered at the hands 
of Illinois through a goal-kick. The Hoosiers played hard, consistent 
foot ball throughout the season, and the eleven was well versed in 
all departments and rudiments of the game. After making several 
assertions to retire from active coaching, James H. Sheldon again has 
been influenced to take charge of the foot ball situation at Bloom- 
ington, and, although his prospects for a strong eleven this season 
are not as bright as last, Jimmy believes he will have a team which, 
will be a worthy opponent for any aggregation in the Conference. 

Wisconsin is awarded fourth position by virtue of its victory over 
Chicago in the last game of the season for both teams. The Badgers, 
with innumerable obstacles to overcome, did as well as any eleven 
could be expected to do in the face of such handicaps. Coach Tom 
Barry, with only mediocre material and a few veterans, developed a 
team which came with bounds before Chicago was met. On the pre- 
ceding Saturday Wisconsin was given an overwhelming defeat by 
Minnesota, but the game seemed to do the team a lot of good, for it 
fought the Maroons with a desperation and determination which 
could not be denied. 

The Badgers lost two games to Conference college elevens, Indiana 
and Minnesota winning from them, while Northwestern held them to 
a scoreless tie. During the season Wisconsin was allowed to play 
only five games, while this year the factulty has removed the ban 
and the eleven will be permitted to schedule seven contests. Coach 
Tom Barry again will tutor the team and brighter prospects for a. 
stronger eleven are entertained at Madison. 

Chicago, which was represented by one of the weakest elevens fin 
the history of the institution, is placed next in the list. It would 
be hard to conceive of a coach facing such a situation as the one which 
confronted Stagg at the beginning of last season. With only eighteen 
eligible players to pick an eleven, part of which, would not be allowed! 
to make the scrub squad at any other university, Stagg bent to his 
task with relentless persistency, and finally developed an eleven 
which was better than even the most optimistic Maroon thoiag&t 
possible. 

Northwestern is awarded sixth place because it won from Iowa, 
but it cannot be placed any higher in the rating because it lost to 
Chicago and was defeated by Illinois. Iowa is given seventh pliaiee 
and Purdue was put at the bottom of the list. 

In closing this article it seems important to mention some of tfte 
changes which the Conference committee, composed of faculty reprsv 
sentatives, adopted at its annual meeting held in Chicago last 
December. A rule was passed unanimously forbidding any Confer- 
ence athletic team to engage in contests with teams representing 
another institution which was a member of the organization and 
then withdrew. It readily can be seen that this ruling forever puts 
an end to Michigan's competition with Conference athletic teams 
unless the Wolverines return to the fold. 

It also was decided to forbid Conference base ball and foot ball 
teams in engaging in contests with those not representing universities 
or colleges in this section. This puts a stop to intersectional con- 
tests, and in passing this rule the committee thought more interest 
would be added to the sport in this section of the country. 

Another rule was passed making it imperative for every Conference 
foot ball team to play at least four games with other Conference 
elevens during the season, and it further was agreed to make this 
movement rotary as far as possible, so that in the course of time 
each foot ball aggregation will meet every other team in the 
organization. 





fk % 


S' '$ f ...^ i 




: >=# -safcr^*- -mud 





1, Page, Graduate Mgr. ; 2, St. John, Ath. Dir. ; 3, Hutchinson; 4, Thomssen; 
5, Rathmell; 6, Brinkerhoff; 7, Jones; 8, Parks, Mgr.; 9, Nottingham; 10, 
Little; 11, Patton, Capt. ; 12, Hicks: 13, Littick; 14, Curl; 15, Schuster; 16, 
Hyer; 17, Rathbun; 18, Shepherd; 19, Lowe; 20, Severance. 

OHIO WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY. DELAWARE. OHIO. 




1, Haggerty, Conch; 2, Bethel; 3, Fleming; 4, Criss; 5, Costigan; fi, Scott; 

7 Selby; 8, Wilhoit; 9, Jackson, Capt.; 10, Zimmerman; 11, Conrad; 12, 

Weeks; 13, Akers; 14, Grimm; 15, Read, Mgr. Chart, Photo. 

BUCHTEL COLLEGE, AKRON, OHIO. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 69 

Foot Ball in the Middle States 

By George W. Orton, University of Pennsylvania. 

The season of 1910 in the Middle States was a banner one from a 
foot ball standpoint, as there were many teams in this section play- 
ing the game up to a very high standard. Though Pennsylvania and 
Princeton are taken up more fully by the editor of this book, Walter 
Camp, in his chapter on the so-called "big" colleges, it is only right 
that we should remark upon their respective strength. Despite the 
reverse by Ursinus in the first game of the season, the play of Penn- 
sylvania's eleven during the fall clearly entitles them to be ranked 
first among the Middle States colleges. In passing, it may he stated 
that of the team that played against Ursinus in Penn's initial game 
only two made the 'varsity. But the 15 to victory over Brown at 
Providence, the 10 to against State, the 17 to 5 against the 
Indians, the 18 to against Lafayette, and the games with Michigan 
and Cornell, showed that the Penn coaches had developed a team of 
exceptional power. 

Princeton's position is not so secure, though it is undoubtedly true 
that the Tigers had a stronger and better team than that of the 
previous season. The "Middies" defeated the Indians by the same 
score as the Princeton eleven, and their work throughout the season 
seems to indicate that they had a team equal in strength at least 
with Princeton's. The Tiger eleven was developed slowly but surely, 
great stress being laid on the defense, the result of this being shown 
in their work during the season, as the lone five points made by Yale 
were the only points against Princeton s during the whole fall. 

Barring the above two members of the "Big Six," with which this 
chapter treats only incidentally, the honor of leading the other col- 
leges of the Middle States should go to the Navy. They were devel- 
oped very much as Princeton was, with great attention paid to the 
defense. Here, again, results proved the wisdom of this, for not a 
single point was scored against the Navy during the year. When it 
is considered that they met such good teams as Washington and 
Jefferson, Western Reserve, Lehigh, New York University, Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute, New York University and the Carlisle Indians 
without being scored on, it then does not seem so surprising that 
they withstood all the assaults of the strong Army team, and finally 
defeated them, 3 to 0. In Dalton, the Navy produced one of the 
best offensive and defensive half-backs of the season, while he was 
also valuable through his accurate punting. 

It is practically impossible to choose between the next three teams 
— Lafayette, Carlisle and Pittsburg, but if it were necessary to make 
a definite choice, I would place them in the order just given. 
Lafayette had a team of undoubted strength, as they held Princeton 
to a 3 to score, and, in fact, gave the Tigers several scares during 
the afternoon. In the Penn game the Easton players were put to 
rout by the unexpectedly strong attack uncovered by the Quakers, 
and the score, 18 to 0, hardly showed the true strength of Lafayette. 
But victories over Ursinus, Swarthmore, Gettysburg, Bucknell and 
Lehigh, with the final slaughter of Dickinson by 41 to 0, should give 
Lafayette a real claim of the leadership of the Pennsylvania colleges 
at lea&t. The unfortunate injury to Lafayette's great full-back, 
Conover, early in the season weakened the Eastonians, but Captain 
Foresman, iDanonhouer and Woodcock showed that they were close to 



1, J. B. Price, Ath. Dir.; 2, Quay; 3, Donthelt; 4. R. Thompson; 5, Slonaker; 
6, Matthiew; 7, Isenberg; 8, K. Thompson; 9, Gerges, Capt. ; 10, Gay; 11, 
Yohe; 12, Kichline; 13, West; 14, Pownall. Bussa, Photo. 

URSINUS COLLEGE, COLLEGEYILLE, PA. 




1, Finney, Mgr. ; 2, Russell; 3, Ashton; 4, Allen; 5, Cleland; 6, Hollenbeck. 
Coach; 7, Weigle; 8, Manson; 9, Mansell, Capt.; 10, Graham; 11, Parrish; 
12, Louis; 13. McClure; 14, Phillips; 15, Beach. 

WESTMINSTER COLLEGE. NEW WILMINGTON. PA. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 71 

All-America form in their respective positions. Danonhouer shone 
throughout the season as a handler of punts and runner in the open 
field. 

Coach Warner of the Carlisle Indians deserves great credit for the 
strong team that he developed last year, as but three 'varsity men 
were available for the team at the beginning of the season. Out of 
new material he developed an eleven that made a good showing 
against some of the strongest teams in the country. Carlisle played 
many games outside of Pennsylvania, but her victories over Villanova, 
Dickinson, Bucknell, Gettysburg, and the high standard of play shown 
against Princeton, Pennsylvania, Annapolis, etc., proved that the 
Indians were to be feared as in former years. Houser's name will 
live long in Carlisle's annals as one of the many famous foot ball 
men they have developed. 

Great claims have been made for the University of Pittsburg eleven, 
and it is rather difficult to classify them. Their claim of being the 
best team in Pennsylvania will hardly hold against those of Lafayette 
and Carlisle, but they have a clear right to the championship of 
Western Pennsylvania and to be ranked close up for the larger honor. 
Much stress is laid on their victory over Penn State, but that team 
was confessedly weaker than it had been for years, as their work 
throughout the season showed. In ranking them as high as is given 
here, the writer believes that he is doing Pittsburg full justice. They 
had the best team they have ever produced, going through the season 
without a defeat, and, what is more noteworthy, without a single 
point tallied against them. 

Ursinus must be ranked next. In fact, it is a question if this 
college should not be placed on a par with Pittsburg. Their victory 
over Pennsylvania at the beginning of the season was a noteworthy 
achievement, even though they caught Penn unprepared. But their 
game against Lafayette, which they held to a 10 to score, and 
their victories over Franklin and Marshall, Dickinson and Swarth- 
more, proved that the team was strong — in fact, the best that Ursinus 
has ever had. 

It is but rarely that we find State so far down the list of Middle 
States colleges, hut they were not up to the form of the previous 
season, though they had a very good eleven. Their best work was 
done in the game with Bucknell, in which they played very fast ball, 
winning by 45 to 3. But in their final and most important contest, 
Pittsburg proved superior. 

Of the other Pennsylvania colleges, Gettysburg had a very good 
year, beating out Bucknell, Dickinson and Franklin and Marshall, 
their real rivals. Villanova was another team that made a good 
showing during the season, while Franklin and Marshall, Haverford, 
Rutgers, Swarthmore, Dickinson and Lehigh had but fairly good 
elevens. In the Western part of the State, Westminster and Alle- 
gheny colleges ranked next to Pittsburg, with Washington and Jeffer- 
son and Geneva following. Washington and Jefferson was not up to 
the form of previous seasons. 

In Maryland, Johns Hopkins was the leader, with Western Mary- 
land College next, while further South, Georgetown was the undis- 
puted champion, as they scored victories over North Carolina, 
Virginia Military Institute and Virginia. 

As for the comparative standing of the best colleges of this section 
with those of other sections, it may be stated that the standard of 
play seemed to be of equally high grade as that shown by the New 
England colleges. In the ranking of the teams of the East, Lafayette, 
the Navy and Carlisle were placed in the first ten colleges by all the 
best critics, an indication that the general opinion is that these 
colleges rank high in Eastern college foot ball. 



h. S € 'f '♦•••.. ^ 


f 




ir. /* 




1 1 





1, Dotson, Mgr. ; 2. E. White; 3. Levering; 4, Gardner; 5, King; 6, Reiter. 
Coach; 7, Starr; 8, C. White; 9, Gradinaroff ; 10, Schimmel; 11, Drumm, 
Capt. ; 12, Humphrey; 13, Sawtelle; 14, Metcalf, Asst. Mgr.; 15, Wieser; 16. 
Robinson; 17, Earle. MARIE TTA (OHIO) COLLEGE. 




1, Babb; 2, Johnson; 3, Earle; 4, Webb, Capt.; 5, Campbell; 6, Harrison; 7, 

Glltner; 8, Gaiser; 9, Shanklin; 10, Threlkeld; 11, Watkins; 12, Boyd, Mgr. 

KENTUCKY STATE UNIVERSITY, LEXINGTON, KY. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 73 



South Atlantic Foot Ball 

By W. A. Lambeth, University of Virginia. 

Great apprehension concerning the future of foot ball in this sec- 
tion was felt at 'the beginning of last season. Here, as everywhere, 
the game was on trial under the most serious indictments. Its 
acquittal was greeted enthusiastically by the thousands of its friends 
who, though partisan, felt that if radical measures were not adopted 
they could no longer stand in its defense. It is true, ol course, that 
those who had made serious study of this sport knew that the evils 
were not inherent in the rules or in the game, but that they were the 
result of the temperament of American youth. Our foot ball rules have 
always been more restraining, more prohibitive than the rules for 
similar sport in other countries. The universal success that attends 
all kinds of American endeavor is in a great measure due to that 
American trait of pushing quickly their undertakings to the very 
limit permitted by law or custom. So in foot ball the rule makers 
have for years annually engaged in shearing off the previous season's 
pernicious shoots which seemed to them to threaten the perfect 
growth of the main stem. The Rules Committee which has, for three 
decades, framed the laws of play, has never been unmindful of its 
duty and its greater responsibility. Sometimes, as one looks back- 
ward, it is possible to see that the committee had not promptly 
enough used its pruning hook upon adventitious buds of danger. Yet 
we must remember that the committee's responsibility did not end 
with mere elimination or danger, but involved the sacred duty of 
preserving to the youth of America one of the most powerful and 
useful auxiliary forces in our educational system. Those who have 
criticised harshly could not know how much they owe to such men 
as Walter Camp, who, at personal inconveniences, has given this 
interest the strength and value which goes with his splendid fore- 
sight and constructive genius. While Mr. Camp has been the central 
figure, he has been surrounded m by colleagues of special fitness for 
the task ; men who, while they loved the game and sought its perfect 
adaptation, always endeavored to shape its destiny with a view to 
making it an instrument for the advancement of educational good. 

The new Rules Committee, while constantly changing its personnel, 
will unquestionably profit by experience and continue, each year, plac- 
ing restraint upon growing evils : for. with hundreds of acute-minded 
specialists, striving always to trim as close to the limits as possible. 
no set of rules can remain fixed. They must be changed each year 
as the evolution of the game requires. 

The institutions in the South Atlantic have faith in the ability and 
determination of the committee to guard and direct this interest in 
the best possible manner. 

The new rules, as operated here, were very satisfactory. The 
majority of the teams played up to their standard and drew back 
to themselves their friends and followers, who had grown lukewarm 
during the previous season. 

St. John's, Virginia Military Institute, Davidson College, and Wash- 
ington and Lee, all played local as well as extra State games, adding 
to their prestige throughout the section. In this group Davidson, 
while defeating North Carolina, was later defeated by Washington 
and Lee. Here is one of the annual illustrations of misdirected 
energy. To be sure, Davidson deserves great credit for defeating 




1, Quinn; 2, Kidd; 3, Keim; 4, Graff; 5, Leisy; 6, Katz; 7, Scott; 8, Cole- 
man, Capt. ; 9, Skean; 10, Kline; 11. Cressman: 12, Bixler; 13, Shilling-; 14. 
Krauss; 15, Snyder; 16, Brandt, Mgr. ; 17, Saracool; IS, Flexer; 19, Nenon. 



MUHLENBERG COLLEGE. 



Lindenmuth, Photo. 




1, Doudigan; 2, Gormley; 3, Flannigan; 4, Sheehan; 5, Neuser; 6, Curley; 7, 
Walsh; 8, Slavin; 9, McLaughlin; 10. McCormack, Capt.: 11. Kilhullin: 12, 
trader; 13, Kelly; 14. Casey: 15, O'Brien; 10, Murphy; 17, Barr. 

VILLANOVA COLLEGE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 75 

Carolina. It is, however, an example of immature athletic judgment 
for her to exhaust her interest and enthusiasm in preparing for that 
game, leaving the Washington and Lee contest, which is for Davidson 
athletically more important, to be played with a remnant of interest 
and energy. But Davidson is not the only illustration of this 
Southern weakness. When will the teams of this division discover 
their rivals and set about to play them their best games? 

Washington and Lee had, on the whole, a disastrous season, which 
was brought to a close by an inauspicious defeat at the hands of 
Alabama in Birmingham. Unless it is her policy to make a fixture 
of this contest, it was time lost. 

Virginia Military Institute, under the coaching of Gloth, improved 
upon the previous season, and defeated by a large score the strong 
St. John's team. 

South Carolina fought hard with an immature and inexperienced 
team. While defeated in her important game, there is a feeling that 
she has laid by capital for another year. 

Wake Forest College re-established the game this season after a 
lapse of many years. The work done was not sufficient to justify 
a prediction as to her probable future position. 

The University of North Carolina ended the most disastrous season 
in her history, having lost both games in which her interest centered, 
as well as five of her preliminary games. She opened the season 
with a wealth of material to work with, the best that was seen at 
any Southern college. For some reason beyond understanding it was 
frittered away with her lost opportunities. The characteristic and 
grim determination of the Tar Heels, however, will probably make 
up next season for this catastrophe. Bocock, who has for two seasons 
demonstrated his qualifications as coach at Blacksburg, will take 
Brides' place at Chapel Hill next year, and this warrants a prediction 
of a successful season. 

No team in this division has been more consistent in her rise to 
fame than the Agricultural and Mechanical College of North Carolina, 
having this year won her championship game with the Virginia Poly- 
technic Institute. This team has built up a strong rivalry with 
her Virginia competitor, and their Thanksgiving game is a rapidly 
growing attraction. 

The Virginia Polytechnic defeated George Washington University 
and Washington and Lee, two teams in rivalry with her, but lost 
to Agricultural and Mechanical, her leading antagonist. 

Georgetown, under the tutelage of Neilson and the captaincy of 
Daly, won her season for the first time in four years. She defeated 
both her rivals, Virginia and North Carolina, winning a clear cham- 
pionship in her series. 

In the North Carolina Agricultural, the Washington and Lee and 
Virginia Polytechnic series, A. and M. won first place by defeating 
Virginia Polytechnic, which had already defeated Washington and 
Lee. The A. and M.-Washington and Lee game was cancelled on 
account of injuries to the Washington and Lee players. 

The interesting and well-balanced series of games in the Eastern 
Virginia section, consisting of William and Mary, Richmond College, 
Hampden-Sidney and Randolph-Macon, was won by the latter, they 
having defeated the other three. Hampden-Sidney secured the second 
position by defeating two. In many ways this series is the pride of 
the State, being pursued as a continuous policy, with ethical sports- 
manship beyond criticism. 

The Clemson-South Carolina-Davidson games were won by Clemson, 
she having defeated both her rivals. 

The Virginia-Hopkins Alliance, which the press has told us so 
much about, is the cause of considerable speculation. This completes 




1, Lanhani; 2, Pierce; 3, Graham; 4, Curry; 5, Smith; 6, Root; 7. Edward?, 

Coach; 8, Arrett: 9, Orr; 10, Brooks, Mgr. ; 11, Kellison, Capt. ; 12, Long; 

13, Young; 14. Lightner. Clark, Photo. 

WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAX COLLEGE, BtJCKHANNON, W. VA. 




1, Arthur, Mgr.; 2, Cochran; 3, Bissell; 4, Shroeder; o, Carson; 6, Hen- 
derson; 7, Tupper; S, Ezell; 9, Faris; 10, Martin; 11, Stevens; 12, Epps; 13, 
Coles; 14, Lachicotte; 15, S. Britt; 1G, Bates; 1.7. Connelly; 18, Dobson, 
Coach; 19, Kangetter; 20, W. Britt; 21, Foster; 22, Hanckel, Capt.; 23, 
Gilmer; 24, Woodward. 

CLEMSON (S. C.) AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 77 

the arrangement for all these branches of sport, and it will unques- 
tionably have its influence upon the South Atlantic athletic map. 
There have been rumors that Georgetown and Carolina are to be 
taken into this alliance, each playing in rounded manner two others, 
but each omitting to play one other each year. Such a scheme is 
open to strong objection, since it destroys very desirable continuity. 
The facts concerning the alliance are kept closely guarded for some 
unknown reason. 

ALL-SOUTH ATLANTIC TEAM. 

Bowen (Virginia) and Winston (N. C. U.), ends. 

Hart (George Washington) and Geyer (Virginia), tackles. 

Fitzgerald (Georgetown) and Thompson (Carolina), guards. 

Bray (N. C. A. and M.), center. 

Costello (Georgetown), quarter-back. 

Fury (Georgetown) and Robertson (N. C. A. and M.), half-backs. 

Hodgson (V. P. I.), full-back. 

As usual, when attempting to select a team representative of the 
section, the writer wishes that there were more places to be filled 
in order to utilize the material at hand. While, therefore, many 
who deserve consideration must be left out, the team above selected 
comes nearer representing the strength of the section and satisfying 
all the demands than any combination which has suggested itself. 

At right end we secure a steady and heady defensive player, and 
when this is coupled with his accurate and distance punting he makes 
what is perhaps the most valuable asset to the team named. 

Hart of George Washington, while poorly supported during the 
season, is again given the place, for, all things considered, he and 
Geyer are the best tackles in the section. 

Fitzgerald and Thompson are chosen for guards because of their 
experience, their defensive work and their inexhaustible physical 
powers. The Georgetown man is particularly aggressive, and Thomp- 
son is a safe man in his position. 

Bray of N. C. A. and M. is selected as center, and, while not a 
brilliant man in this position, he is better than any other, unless 
it be Holiday of Virginia. 

Costello of Georgtown would be a treasure on any team. His 
goal-kicking would make him worthy were he shorn of many of his 
other splendid accomplishments. He was the biggest of Georgetown's 
assets in their biggest game. Clean dodging in the open, clean 
handling of punts, and his quick intellectual mastery of crucial situa- 
tions mark him as a modern quarter. 

Fury is placed at left half because of his swiftness, combined with 
quick starting and great speed when under way. 

Robertson of N. C. A. and M. is the only selection which the 
writer has not seen, but having been universally chosen for this 
position by those who have seen his work, he is chosen as Fury's 
running mate. 

For full-back there is only one choice. While Hodgson has hardly 
had a competitor, this does not mean that he would not be chosen 
if he had, for he is a good defensive man and a plunging full-back 
for steady gains. 



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SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



79 



Official Foot Ball Rules, 1911 

Copyright, 1911, by American Sports Publishing Co. 



RULE I. 

FIELD. 

Section 1. The game shall be played Dimensions, 
upon a rectangular field, 330 feet in length 
and 160 feet in width, enclosed by heavy 
white lines marked in lime upon the ground. 
The lines at the two ends shall be termed 
Goal Lines. Those on the two sides shall 
be termed Side Lines and shall be consid- 
ered to extend beyond their points of in- 
tersection with the goal lines. The rec- 
tangular space bounded by the goal lines 
and the side lines shall be technically known 
as the Field of Play. Field of Play. 

Section 2. The field shall be marked off Marking, 
at intervals of 5 yards, with white lines par- 
allel to the goal lines. 

(See Note 1, Page 139.) 

Section 3. The goal shall be placed in the Goal, 
middle of each goal line, and shall consist 
of two upright posts exceeding 20 feet in 
height and placed 18 feet 6 inches apart, 
with a horizontal cross-bar 10 feet from 
the ground. 

RULE II. 

BALL. 

Section 1. The foot ball used shall be of 
leather, enclosing an inflated rubber blad- 
der. The ball shall have the shape of a 
prolate spheroid. 



Ball. 



80 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE III. 

PLAYERS AND SUBSTITUTES. 

Number of Section 1. The game shall be played by 
Players, two teams of eleven men each. 

Substitutes. Section 2. A player may be substituted 
for another at any time. In such a case the 
substitute must go directly to the Referee 
and report himself before engaging in play. 
A player who has been removed during the 
game may be returned to the game once at 
the beginning of any subsequent period. 
A player disqualified for cause may not be 
returned to the game. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

For not so reporting— Loss of 15 yards. 

Equipment of Section 3. No player having projecting 
Players, nails or iron plates on his shoes or any pro- 
jecting metallic or hard substance on his 
person shall be allowed to play in a game. 
If head protectors are worn, no sole leather, 
papier mache, or other hard or unyielding 
material shall be used in their construction, 
and all other devices for protectors must be 
so arranged and padded as, in the judgment 
of the Umpire, to be without danger to 
other players. Leather cleats upon the 
shoes shall be allowed as heretofore. 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

Suspension, unless the fauSt is corrected 
within two minutes. 

RULE IV. 

LENGTH OF GAME. 

Length of Section 1. The length of the game shall 
Periods, be 60 minutes, divided into four periods of 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 81 

RULE IV. 

15 minutes each, exclusive of time taken 
out, though it may be of shorter duration 
by mutual agreement between the managers 
or captains of the contesting teams. 

In case no such agreement is reached 
before 10 minutes after the time scheduled 
for beginning the game, the Referee shall 
order the game to proceed and the full time 
shall be played. 

Section 2. (a) There shall be two Intermission, 
minutes intermission between the first and 
second periods and between the third and 
fourth periods, during which time no player 
shall leave the field of play, nor shall any 
representative of either team be allowed on 
field of play, except as provided for in 
Rule XXV., Sections 2 and 3. 

(For penalty see Rule XVI, Section U.) 

PENALTY (Referee., Umpire, Field Judge) 

For player leaving the field at the two- 
minute intermission— Same as coaching 
from side lines. 

(6) There shall be fifteen minutes inter- 
mission between the second and third 
periods. The Referee shall cause both 
teams to be notified three minutes before 
said intermission has expired. Fifteen 
minutes after the close of the second period, 
the Referee shall blow his whistle in the 
middle of the field, and in case either team 
fails to appear within two minutes there- 
after, the ball shall be put in play as first 
down by the offended side on the offending 
side's thirty-yard line. 

(See Note 25, Page 142.) 



g 2 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT ' BALL GUIDE. 

RULE IV. 

Darkness. Section 3. Whenever the commencement 
of a game is so late that in the opinion of the 
Referee there is any likelihood of the game 
being interfered with by darkness, he shall, 
before play begins, arbitrarily shorten the 
four periods to such length as shall insure 
four equal periods being completed, and 
shall notify both captains of the exact time 
thus set. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

For refusal to abide by the opinion of the 
Referee under Section 3— Forfeiture of the 
game. 

Time extended. Section 4. Time shall not be called for 
the end of a period until the ball is dead, and 
in the case of a touchdown the try-at-goal 
shall be allowed. 

RULE V. 

SCORING. 

Scoring. The ^ame shall be decided by the final 
score at the end of the four periods. The 
following shall be the value of plays in 
scoring: 

Touchdown, 5 points. 

Goal from touchdown, 1 point. 

Goal from the field, 3 points. 

Safety by opponents, 2 points. 
The score of a forfeited game shall be 1 
to in favor of the offended side. 

RULE VI. 

DEFINITIONS. 

Place-kick. Section 1. A Place-kick is kicking the 
ball after it has been placed on the ground. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



RULE VI. 

A Kick-off is a place-kick from the center Kick-off. 
of the field of play. 

(For position of players see Rule IX., Page 93.) 

A Punt is dropping the ball from the Punt, 
hand or hands and kicking it before it 
touches the ground. 

A Punt-out is a punt made by a player Punt-out. 
of the side which has made a touchdown to 
another of his own side for a fair catch. 

{For position of players see Rule XL, Page 95.) 

A Drop-kick is dropping the ball from the Drop-kick, 
hand or hands and kicking it the instant 
it rises from the ground. 

A Kick-out is a drop-kick, place-kick or Kick-out. 
punt made by a player of the side which 
has made a safety or a touchback. 

(For position of players see Rule X„ Page 94.) 

A Free-kick is any kick when the oppo- Free-kick. 
nents are restrained by rule from advancing 
beyond a certain point before the ball is put 
in play, and includes Kick-off, Kick-out, 
Punt-out, Kick from a Fair Catch, and 
Place-kick for Goal after a touchdown. 

Section 2. Snapping the ball is putting Snapping the 
it back from its position on the ground with ball, 
one quick and continuous motion of hand 
or hands or of the foot. 

Section 3. A Scrimmage takes place Scrimmage, 
when the holder of the ball places it flat 
upon the ground, with its long axis at right 
angles to the line of scrimmage, and puts it 
in play by snapping it back. The scrim- 
mage does not end until the ball is dead. 

The Line of Scrimmage for each side is Line of 
an imaginary line parallel to the goal line Scrimmage. 



84 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE VI. 

and passing through that point of the ball 
nearest the side's own goal line. 

If the snapper-back does not hold the 
long axis of ball as specified, ball must be 
put in play over again. 

(For position of players see Rule VIII., Page 91, and Note U, 
Page 139. See illustrations Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 1*, Page 143.) 

Off-side. Section 4. A player is Off-side when the 
ball has last been touched by one of his 
own side behind him. 

[For restrictions on Off-side players see Rule XX., Page 112.) 

Fair Catch. Section 5. A Fair Catch is catching the 
ball after it has been kicked by one of the 
opponents and before it touches the ground, 
or in similarly catching a "punt-out" by 
another of the catcher's own side, provided 
the player (except in case of punt-out, where 
no signal is necessary), while advancing 
toward the ball, signals his intention of 
making a fair catch by raising his hand 
clearly above his head, and does not take 
more than two steps after making the catch. 

(For putting ball in play after, see Rule XV., Sections 2 and 11, 
Pages 98, 100. See illustrations Nos. 9 and 10, Page 144.)' 

Not a fair catch. It is not a fair catch if the ball after the 

kick was touched by another of the catcher's 

side before the catch. 
Mark of catch. The mark of the catch is the spot at which 

the ball is actually caught. 
Opportunity to Opportunity to make a fair catch is where 
make fair catch, the player is in such a position that it would 

be possible for him to reach the ball before 

it touches the ground. 

(For interference and false signalling see Rule XVII., Page 

104, Sections 3. U and 5.) 
(See also Note 19. Page 141.) 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 85 

RULE VL 

Section 6. A Down occurs when the Down. 
Referee blows his whistle or declares the 
ball dead. 

(See Note 21, Page 142.) 

The Referee shall blow his whistle or 
declare the ball dead: 

(a) When a player having the ball cries 
"Down"; 

(6) When any portion of his person, ex- 
cept his hands or feet, touches the ground 
while he is in the grasp of an opponent; 

(c) When he goes out of bounds ; or, 

(For definition of Out of Bounds, see Section 13, Page 88.) 

(d) Whenever he is so held that his for- 
ward progress has been stopped; 

(e) When, on a forward pass, the ball, 
after being passed forward, touches the 
ground before being touched by a player of 
either side. 

(See Rule XIX. t Page 110. Section 4.) 

(f) When the ball, after having been 
legally passed forward, goes out of bounds 
before it touches the ground and before it 
has been touched by a player of either side. 

(See Rule XIX., Page 111, Section 6.) 

Section 7. A Touchdown is made when Touchdown, 
the ball lawfully in possession of a player is 
declared dead by the Referee, any part of it 
being on, above or behind the opponents' 
goal line. 

The Touchdown is marked at the point 
not where the ball is carried across the line, 
but where the ball is called "down" by the 
Referee, and if the ball is carried across the 
extension of the side line, is marked at the 



86 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE VI. 

point where the side line crosses the goal 
line. 

(For Touchdown from Kick-oft, see Rule VII., Page 91, Sec. 2.) 

Touchback. Section 8. A Touchback is made when 
the ball in possession of a player guarding his 
owngoal is declared dead by the Referee, any 
part of it being on, above or behind the goal 
line, provided the impetus which sent it to or 
across the line was given by an opponent. 
The Referee shall declare the ball dead be- 
hind the goal line just as if it were on the 
field of play. 

It is also a Touchback when a kicked ball 
(other than one from kick-off, free kick, 
or one scoring a goal from the field) goes 
over the goal line either on the fly or after 
striking the ground (before being touched 
by a player of either side). If such a ball 
strikes the uprights or cross-bar it shall be 
considered as having crossed the goal line. 
It is a Touchback when a player on de- 
fense permits a ball, kicked by an opponent, 
to strike his person and then roll across the 
goal line, and any player of his side then 
falls on it back of the line. 
Not a It is not a Touchback if such player jug- 

Touchback. gles the ball so that he in any way forces 
it over the line and he or any player of 
his side then falls on it. 

(For Touchback from forward pass see Rule XIX., Pages 111, 

112, Sections 7 and 8.) 
(For Touchback from Kick-off see Rule VII., Page 91, Section 2.} 

Safety. Section 9. A Safety is made when the 
ball in the possession of a player guarding 
his own goal is declared dead by the Referee,, 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 87 

RULE VI. 

any part of it being on, above or behind the 
goal line, provided the impetus which caused 
it to pass from outside the goal to or behind 
the goal line was given by the side defend- 
ing the goal. Such impetus could come : 

(a) From a kick, pass, snap-back or fum- 
ble by one of the player's wn side. 

(b) From a kick which bounded back 
from an opponent. 

(c) In case a player carrying the ball 
is forced back, provided the ball was not 
declared dead by the Referee before the 
line was reached or crossed. 

A Safety is made when a player of the 
side in possession of the ball makes an in- 
completed forward pass behind his goal line 
or commits a foul which would give the 
ball to the opponents behind the offender's 
goal line. 

A Safety is made when the ball, kicked 
by a man behind his goal line, crosses the 
extended portion of either side line. 

Section 10. A Goal from Touchdown is Goal from 
made by kicking the ball from the field of Touchdown, 
play over the cross-bar of the opponents' 
goal, by a place-kick direct, or a place-kick 
preceded by a punt-out. 

If the ball passes directly over one of the 
uprights, or if, after being kicked, it strikes 
an opponent and then passes over the cross- 
bar or one of the uprights, it shall count a 
goal. 

Section 11. A Goal from the Field is Goal from the 
made by kicking the ball from the field of Field, 
play over the cross-bar of the opponents' 



88 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE VI. 

goal in any way except by a punt or a kick- 
off. 

If the ball passes directly over one of the 
uprights, or if, after being kicked, it strikes 
an opponent and then passes over the cross- 
bar or one of the uprights, it shall count 
a goal. 
Foul. Section 12. A Foul is any violation of a 
rule. 
Out of Bounds. Section 13. The ball is Out of Bounds 
when either the ball or any part of a player 
who holds it touches the ground on or out- 
side the side line or side line extended. 
Tripping. Section 14. Tripping is obstructing a 
player below the knee with that part of 
the obstructing player's leg that is below 
the knee. 

(For' penalty see Rule XXIV., Page 116, Section 5. See Note 9. 
Page 140. See illustration No. Ill, Page 145.) 

Hurdling. Section 15. Hurdling as used in the 
rules applies only to the man carrying 
the ball. 

Hurdling in the open is jumping over or 
attempting to jump over an opponent who 
is still on his feet. (A man who is on his 
knee may be hurdled without penalty.) 

Hurdling in the line is jumping over, or 
attempting to jump over, a player on the 
line of scrimmage, with the feet or knees 
foremost, within the distance of 5 yards 
on either side of the point where the ball 
was put in play. 

{For penalty see Rule XXIV., Page 116. Section 4. See Note 10, 
Page 140.) 

Crawling. Section 16. Craivling is an attempt to 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 89 

RULE VI. 

advance the ball by the runner after the 
ball is declared dead. 

If a player extends his arms, pushing the 
ball ahead after it is declared dead, it is 
crawling. 

Section 17. The ball is Dead : Ball is dead. 

(a) When the Referee blows his whistle 
or declares that a down, touchdown, touch- 
back, safety or goal has been made; 

(See Note 21, Page 142.) 

(b) When a fair catch has been made; 

(c) When any portion of the person (ex- 
cept the hands or feet) of the player carry- 
ing the ball touches the ground, when the 
player is in the grasp of an opponent; 

(d) When the ball goes out of bounds 
after a kick, before touching a player who 
is on-side or is otherwise entitled to it; 

(e) When a player carrying the ball goes 
out of bounds; 

(For definition of Out of Bounds, see Section IS, Page 88.) 

(/) When, on a forward pass, the ball, 
after being passed forward, crosses the 
goal line on the fly without touching a 
player of either side; 

(See Rule XIX., Page 111, Section 7.) 

(g) When, on a forward pass, the ball, after 
being passed forward and legally touched 
by any player, crosses the goal line either 
in the air or rolling on the ground; 

(See Rule XIX., Page 112, Section 8.) 

(h) When a kicked ball (except a kick-off 
or free-kick) goes over the goal line on the 
fly or strikes inside the field of play and 



90 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE VI. 

then rolls over the goal line before being 
touched by a player of either side; 

(See Section 8, Page 86. See Note 12, Page 140.) 

(i) At the spot where it was when the 
Referee blew his whistle or declared it dead, 

0") When on a try-at-goal after touch- 
down, the goal has either been made or 
missed. 

(k) When a forward pass becomes an un- 
completed pass under the provisions of 
either Section 4 or Section 5 (a) Rule XIX, 
(See 3 (6), Rule XIX.) 

RULE VII. 

KICK-OFF 

Beginning of Section 1. (a) The captains of the oppos- 
game. ing teams shall toss up a coin before the 
game, the winner of the toss to have his 
choice of goal or kick-off. If the winner of 
the toss selects the goal, the loser must 
take the kick-off. 
Second and (6) At the beginning of the second and 

fourth periods, fourth periods the teams shall change goals, 
the possession of the ball, the down, the 
relative spot of the down, and the distance 
to be gained to remain the same as at the 
termination of the preceding period. 

Third period. (c) At the beginning of the third period 
the teams shall take opposite goals from 
those assumed at the beginning of the sec- 
ond period, and the side which kicked off 
in the first period shall have the option of 
kicking off or having their opponents kick 
off. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE VI8. 

(d) The teams shall not change goals after 
a safety, try-at-goal following a touchdown, 
and after a goal from the field, but the side 
just scored upon shall have the option of 
kicking off or having their opponents kick 
off. 

(For position of players, see Rule IX., Page 93.) 

Section 2. At kick-off , if the ball is kicked 
across the goal line and is there declared 
dead when in the possession of one of the 
side defending the goal, it is a touchback. 

If the ball is not declared dead, the side 
defending the goal may run with it or kick 
it exactly as if it had not crossed the goal 
line. 

If it is declared dead in possession of 
the attacking side, provided that the man 
was on-side, it is a touchdown. 



After 



91 



scoring. 



Ball kicked 
across goal line. 



RULE VIII. 

POSITION OF PLAYERS AT SCRIMMAGE. 

Sectiof 1. When the ball is put in play Seven players on 
by a scrimmage at least seven players of scrimmage line, 
the side holding the ball shall be on the line 
of scrimmage. 

A player shall be considered to be on the Player on 
line of scrimmage if he has both hands or scrimmage line, 
both feet up to or within one foot of this when, 
line, or if he has one foot and the opposite 
hand up to or within one foot of it. He 
shall also stand with both feet outside the 
outside foot of the player next to him, un- 
less he be one of the two men standing on 
either side of and next to the snapper-back 
(commonly known as guards), in which 



92 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE VIII. 

Locking legs, case he may lock legs with the snapper- 
back. 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

Loss of 5 yards. 

(See Note 6, Page 139. See illustrations Nos. 5, 6, 7 and 8 r 

Pages 143, 144.) 
(See Note 23, Page 142.) 

No player Section 2. In a scrimmage no part of any 
ahead of scrim- player shall be ahead of his line of scrim- 
mage line, mage, except that the snapper-back when 
snapping the ball back may have his head 
and his hands or the foot used in snapping 
the ball ahead of his line of scrimmage. 
Snapper-back may assume any position, so 
long as he is not off-side in putting ball in 
play. 

The position on the line of the men in the 
scrimmage is governed by notes and pic- 
tures in back of book. 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

If any player (with the above prmlege to 
snapper-back excepted) is ahead of his tine 
—Loss of 5 yards. 

(See illustration No. U, Page 143.) 

Center, Guards Section 3. No player of those ordinarily 
and Tackles, occupying the position of center, guard, or 
tackle— that is, the five middle players of 
the line— may drop back from the line of 
scrimmage on the offense unless he is at 
least 5 yards back of the line of scrimmage 
when the ball is put in play, and another 
player of those ordinarily behind the line of 
scrimmage takes his place on the line of 
scrimmage. 

PENALTY ( Referee > 

Loss of 5 yards. 

(See Note 7, Page 140.) 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 93 

RULE VIII. 

Section 4. At the moment when the ball One player 
is put in play in a scrimmage, no player of in motion, 
the side which has the ball shall be in mo- 
tion, except that one man of the side hav- 
ing the ball may be in motion either directly 
or obliquely towards his own goal line or 
line extended. If the end is the man in 
motion another must take his place on the 
line of scrimmage, as seven men must be 
on this line when the ball is put in play. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

Loss of 5 yards. 

RULE IX. 

POSITION OF PLAYERS AT KICK-OFF. 

Section 1. The ball shall be kicked from Kicker. 
the center of the field. 

Section 2. The kicker's side shall be Kicker's side, 
behind the ball when it is kicked. 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

The ball shall be kicked off again from a 
point 5 yards back and directly back of the 
center of the field, and a new restraining 
line for the opponents is established 5 yards 
nearer the goal line of the kicker's side. 

Section 3. The opponents shall be be- Opponents. 
hind a line 10 yards in front of the ball 
until the ball is kicked. 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

The ball shall be kicked off again from a 
point which may be 5 yards nearer oppo- 
nents' goal if the kicking side so desires, 
and a new restraining line for opponents is 
established 5 yards nearer the opponents' 
goal. 



94 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE X. 

POSITION OF PLAYERS AT KICK-OUT. 

Kicker. Section 1. The ball shall be kicked out 

from some point inside the kicker's 25-yard 

line. 

Player with ball Section 2. No player of the kicking side 

not to cross line, shall advance beyond the 25-yard line with 

the ball in his possession. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

The ball shall be kicked out from some 
point 5 yards back of the original restrain- 
ing line and a new restraining line for the 
opponents is established 5 yards nearer the 
goal line of the kicker's side. 

Ball not to Section 3. No player of the kicking side 

touch ground, shall allow the ball to touch the ground 

in the field of play without immediately 

thereafter putting it in play by kicking it. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

Same as under Section 2. 

Kicker's side. Section 4. The kicker's side shall be 
behind the ball when it is kicked. 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

Same as under Section 2. 

Opponents. Section 5. The opponents shall be on the 
kicking side's 25-yard line or nearer their 
own goal until : 

(a) The ball is kicked; or, 

(6) The ball touches the ground within 
the field of play (either by accident or 
otherwise); or, 

(c) A player of the kicking side advances 
beyond his restraining line with the ball in 
his possession. 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

The ball shall be kicked out from some 
point 5 yards ahead of the original restrain- 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 95 

RULE X. 

ing line and a new restraining line for the 
opponents is established 5 yards nearer 
their own goal. 

RULE XL 

POSITION OF PLAYERS AT PUNT-OUT. 

Section 1. The punter may not approach Punter, 
nearer the goal than the point where a 
line parallel to the side line and passing 
through the spot of the touchdown intersects 
the goal line. And he shall kick the ball 
from a position behind the goal line within 
the angle formed by the goal line and the 
above intersecting line. 

Section 2. Until the ball is kicked the Punter's side. 
punter's side shall stand in the field of 
play not less than 5 yards from the goal line. 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

The ball shall be punted out again and a 
new restraining line for the punter's side is 
established 5 yards nearer their own goal. 

Section 3. The opponents may line up Opponents, 
anywhere on the goal line except within 
the space of 5 yards on each side of the 
punter's mark, and shall not advance be- 
yond the goal line or come within 5 yards 
of the punter's mark until the ball is kicked. 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

The ball may be punted out again and a new 
restraining line for the opponents is es- 
tablished 5 yards back of their original 
line. 

RULE XII. 

POSITION OF PLAYERS AT PLACE-KICK 
FOR GOAL AFTER TOUCHDOWN, 

Section 1. The ball shall be held for Kicker, 
the kick by another player of the kicker's 
side and must be kicked. 



96 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GLIDE 

RULE XII. 

(a) In case of a place-kick preceded by a 
fair catch of a punt-out, from the mark of 
the fair catch, or any point directly behind it. 

{For definition of Mark of Fair Catch, see Rule VI., Page 84, 
Section 5.) 

(b) In case of a place-kick not preceded 
by a punt-out, from some point to be selected 
by the kicker and by him indicated to the 
Referee outside the goal, on a line parallel 
to the side line and passing through the 
point where the touchdown was declared. 

Player with ball Section 2. No player of the kicking side 
not to cross line, shall advance beyond the point or line from 

which the ball is to be kicked with the ball 

in his possession. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

The ball must be kicked from some point 
5 yards directly back of the original mark 
or point. 

Kicker's side. Section 3. The kicker's side shall be 
behind the ball when it is kicked. 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

Same as under Section 2. 

Opponents. Section 4. The opponents shall stand 
on or behind the goal line until : 

(a) The ball is kicked or the Referee 
signals with his hand that the ball has 
touched the ground; or, 

(6) A player of the kicking side advances 
beyond his restraining line with the ball in 
his possession. 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

The ball may be kicked from some point 5 
yards ahead of the original mark and a new 
restraining line for the opponents is estab- 
lished 5 yards back of the goal line. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 97 

RULE XIII. 

POSITION OF PLAYERS ON FREE KICK 

AFTER FAIR CATCH (OTHER 

THAN FAIR CATCH FROM 

PUNT-OUT). 

Section 1. The ball shall be kicked by Kicker. 
a punt, drop-kick or place-kick, either from 
the mark of the catch or from some point 
directly back of it. 

(For definition of Mark of Fair Catch, see Rule VI. , Page 84, 
Section 5.) 

Section 2. No player of the kicking Player with ball 
side shall advance beyond a line passing not to cross line, 
through the mark of the catch and parallel 
to the goal line with the ball in his posses- 
sion. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

The ball must be kicked from some point 
at least 5 yards back of the original mark 
and a new restraining line for the opponents 
is established 5 yards nearer the original 
mark. 

Section 3. No player of the kicking Ball not to 
side shall allow the ball to touch the ground touch ground, 
in the field of play, without immediately 
thereafter putting it in play by kicking it. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

Same as under Section 2. 

Section 4. The kicker's side shall be Kicker's side, 
behind the ball when it is kicked. 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

Same as under Section 2. 

Section 5. The opponents shall be Opponents, 
behind a line 10 yards in front of the line 
passing through the mark of the catch and 
parallel to the goal line until : 

(a) The ball is kicked; or, 



98 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XIII. 

(6) The ball touches the ground (either 
by accident or otherwise) ; or, 

(c) A player of the kicking side ad- 
vances beyond his restraining line with the 
ball in his possession. 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

The ball may be kicked from a point 5 yards 
ahead of the original mark and a new re- 
straining line for the opponents is estab- 
lished 5 yards nearer their own goal. 

RULE XIV. 

POSITION OF PLAYERS OUT OF BOUNDS. 

Holder of ball. Section 1. No player may be out of 
bounds at the time when the ball is put in 
play except the kicker and the holder of the 
ball in a place-kick. 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

For first violation the ball is brought back 
and played over. 

For further violations during the same 
scrimmage— Loss of 5 yards for each viola- 
tion. 

RULE XV. 

PUTTING THE BALL IN PLAY 

Always scrim- Section 1. The ball shall be put in play 
mage unless — by a scrimmage unless otherwise specific- 
ally provided. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

For first violation the ball is brought back 
and played over. For further violations dur- 
ing the same down (so called)— 5 yards for 
each violation. 

After fair catch. Section 2. After a fair catch the ball 
may be put in play by either a punt, drop- 
kick, place-kick or scrimmage. 

(For definition of Fair Catch, see Rule VI., Page 84, Section 5. 
See Note 5, Page 139.) 



m SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 99 

RULE XV. 

Section 3. If a foul is declared the ball After a foul, 
shall not be put in play again until penalty not until, 
has either been enforced or declined. 

(For definition of Foul, see Rule VI., Page 88, Section 12.) 

Section 4. Any player of the side which Player first 
puts the ball in play, except either of the receiving ball 
men standing on the line of scrimmage on from snapper- 
each side of the snapper-back who first back, 
receives the ball when it is put in play, 
may carry the ball forward beyond the line 
of scrimmage. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

Fop guard carrying the ball— 5 yards. 

Section 5. If, after the snapper-back has Feint to snap 
taken his position, he voluntarily moves the the ball, 
ball as if to snap it, so as to draw the oppo- 
nents off-side, whether he witholds it alto- 
gether or only momentarily, it shall not 
be considered as in play, or the scrimmage 
as begun. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

Loss of 5 yards. 

Section 6. If a player other than the Feints by players 
snapper-back of the side in possession of the of side on offense 
ball makes a deliberate attempt, by a false other than 
start or otherwise, to draw the opponents snapper-back, 
off-side, the ball, if snapped, shall not be re- 
garded as in play or the scrimmage as begun. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

Loss of 5 yards. 

Section 7. At kick-off , if the ball goes out Ball kicked out 
of bounds before it is touched by an oppo- of bounds, 
nent, it shall be brought back and be kicked 
off again. If it is kicked out of bounds a 
second time it shall go as a kick-off to the 



100 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XV. 

opponents. If either side thus forfeits the 
ball twice, it shall go to the opponents, who 
shall put it in play by a scrimmage at the 
center of the field. 

{See Note 15, Page 141.) 

After out of Section 8. If on a kick-out the ball goes 

bounds at out of bounds before striking a player, it 

kick-out. must be kicked out again, and if this occurs 

twice in succession it shall be given to the 

opponents as out of bounds on the 35-yard 

line nearest to the kicker's goal line. 

L {See Note 15, Page 141.) 

After out of Section 9. If a kicked ball other than at 

bounds except kick-off , or kick-out, either before or after 

at kick-off and touching the ground, goes out of bounds 

kick-out. before crossing the opponents' goal line, it 

shall belong to the opponents at the point 

where it crosses the side line. 

But if it strikes any player who is entitled 
to get it and then goes out of bounds it 
shall belong to the player who first obtains 
possession of it. 
Walking in with Section 10. If the ball goes out of bounds, 
ball after out of whether it bounds back or not, a player of 
bounds, the side which is entitled to its possession 
must bring it to the spot where the ball 
crossed the side line, and there, after de- 
claring how far he intends walking, walk 
in with it, in company with the Referee, at 
right angles to the side line, any distance 
not less than 5 nor more than 15 yards, and 
at a point indicated by the Referee put it 
down for a scrimmage. 
Two steps after Section 11. If the player attempting to 
fair catch, make a fair catch takes more than two 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 101 

RULE XV. 

steps after catching the ball, his side must 
put the ball in play by a scrimmage at a 
point 5 yards back of the mark of the catch. 
(But see Rule XV., Section 14.) 

(See Note 22, Page 142.) (Field Judge) 

(See Rule VI. . Page 84, Section 5.) 

Section 12. If in case of a try-at-goal Ball touching 
after a touchdown the ball is not kicked ground at 
after having been allowed to touch the try-at-goal to go 
ground once, no second attempt shall be as a kick-off. 
permitted and the ball shall be kicked off 
at the center of the field exactly as if the 
try-at-goal had been made. 

Section 13. After the try - at - goal, After try-at-goal 
whether the goal be made or missed, the ball to go as a 
ball shall be put in play by a kick-off at the kick-off. 
center of the field. 

Section 14. If a fair catch is not made f °. n failu ' e of 
on the first attempt on a punt-out, the ball taur catch at 
shall be put in play by a kick-off at the P^t-out ball to 
center of the field. *° as a klck ' off - 

Section 15. After a touchback or a After touchback 
safety, the side making the touchback or or safety, 
the safety shall at their own option put the 
ball in play either by a kick-out (See Rule 
X.) or by a scrimmage from first down on 
their own 25-yard line. 

RULE XVI. 

DELAY OF GAME. 

Section 1. Time shall be taken out when- Time taken out. 
ever the game is necessarily delayed or 
while the ball is being brought out for a 
try-at-goal, punt-out, kick-out, or kick-off, 
after a fair catch has been made, during 



102 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XVI. 

enforcement of penalty for uncompleted 
forward pass, or when play is for any rea- 
son suspended by the Referee. Time shall 
begin again when the ball is actually put 
in play. 
Ball out of Section 2. Time shall not be taken out 
bounds, when the ball goes out of bounds except 
at the direction of the Referee, and then 
only in case of unreasonable delay in re- 
turning the ball to play. 
By request of Section 3. Either captain may ask that 
Captains, time be called three times during each half 
(the first half consisting of the first and 
second periods, and the second half of the 
third and fourth periods) without penalty. 
If thereafter, however, time is taken out 
at the request of a captain, his side shall 
be penalized by a loss of two yards for 
each time (unless a player be removed 
from the game), the number of the down 
and the point to be gained remaining the 
same as they were before the request 
was made. 
By order of The Referee, however, may suspend play 
Referee, at any time at his own discretion without 
penalty to either side. 
Length of delay. Section • 4. No delay arising from any 
cause whatsoever shall continue more than 
two minutes. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

Unreasonable delay on the part of side 

not in possession of ball— 5 yards and the 

scrimmage following to be counted as first 

down. 

Unreasonable delay on the part of side in 
possession v of the ball— 5 yards, the down 
and the point to be gamed for the first down 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 103 

RULE XVI. 

remaining the same as they were at the 
beginning of the scrimmage during which 
the delay occurred. 

Refusal of either side to play within two 
minutes after having been ordered to do so 
by the Referee-forfeiture of the game. 

RULE XVII. 

UNLAWFUL INTERFERENCE WITH PLAY. 

Section 1. Before the ball is put in play Interference 
the opponents must not interfere in any with snapper- 
way with the snapper-back, nor touch him back or ball. 
or the ball. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

Loss of 5 yards. 

Section 2. Before the ball is put in play Interference 
no player shall lay his hands upon, or by with opponents* 
the use of his hands or arms, interfere 
with an opponent in such a way as to delay 
putting the ball in play. 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

Loss of 5 yards. 

Section 3. When a player has an oppor- Interference 
tunity for making a fair catch, opponents with opportunity 
who are off-side shall not in any way inter- for making fair 
fere with him or with the ball. catch. 

PENALTY (Field Judge) 

Loss of 15 yards and offended side to have 
fair catch whether ball be caught or not. 

(For definition of Opportunity to Make a Fair Catch, see 

Rule VI., Page 84, Section 5.) 
(See Note 19, Page 141.) 
(See Rule XV., Section 2, Page 98.) 

Section 4. No player shall be thrown to Maker of fair 
the ground after he has made a fair catch, catch not to be 

PENALTY (Field Judge) thrown. 

Loss of 15 yards. 

(For definition of Fair Catch, see Rule VL, Page 84. Section 5.) 



104 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XVII. 

Signal for fair Section 5. In case a signal for a fair 

catch protects catch is made by any player who has an 

only the player opportunity for a fair catch, and another 

signalling, player of his side who has not signaled for 

a fair catch catches the ball, no run shall be 

made, nor shall the fair catch be allowed, 

but the ball shall be given to the catcher's 

side for a scrimmage at the point where the 

catch was made. ( field judge) 

{For definitions see Rule VI. , Page 84. Section 5.) 

Interlocked Section 6. No player of the side in pos- 
Interference. session of the ball shall use his hands, arms 
or body, to push, pull or hold upon his feet 
the player carrying the ball, nor shall there 
be any interlocked interference. By inter- 
locked interference is meant the grasping 
of one another by, or encircling the body to 
any degree with, the hands or arms by the 
players of the side in possession of the ball. 
The runner with the ball may place his 
hand on team mate, but may not grasp him, 
so as to be pulled by him. (The side in 
possession of the ball may push their oppo- 
nents with their bodies. Official should 
blow his whistle when forward progress 
stops. ) A comrade may not lift a fallen man 
to his feet to enable him to continue his run. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

Loss of 15 yards. 

RULE XVIII. 

OBSTRUCTION OF OPPONENTS BY USE OF 

HANDS AND ARMS AFTER THE 

BALL IS PUT IN PLAY. 

[In order to define the limits of the 20- 
yard zone described later in this rule, the 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUTI>E. 105 

RULE XVIII. 

home ground should provide some sort of 
an object to be placed in the field of play of 
such a character as not to be injurious to a 
player falling upon it, but which shall show 
at a glance where the 20-yard zone ends, 
and the Field Judge should take his posi- 
tion near this marked limit. Any soft bag, 
weighted, and of white material will an- 
swer.] 

Section 1. The player running with the Player running 
ball may ward off opponents with his hands with ball. 

and arms. (Umpire) 

Section 2. No player of either side while 
in the act of catching a forward pass shall 
be tackled, thrown, pushed, pulled, should- 
ered or straight-armed until he shall have 
touched the ball, provided that any such 
interference which is incidental to a bona 
fide attempt to catch or intercept the pass 
shall not come within this prohibition. 

A man who is ineligible to catch the ball 
may not run into the opponents. 

It should also be noted that any forward 
pass, whether it crosses the scrimmage line 
or not, must be made from at least five 
yards back of that scrimmage line. 

PENALTY (Umpire, Field Judge) 

For side which put the ball in play, if such 
offense occurs before a "third down" has 
been declared (i. e., if it occurs during a 
play following either a first or second down) 
the offending side shall put the ball in play 
at the spot of the preceding down, and the 
play shall count as a down. The point to 
be gained shall remain the same. 

if, however, such offense occurs after a 
third down has been declared (i. e., if it 
occurs during a play following a third down) 



106 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XVIII. 

the ball shall go to the opponents at the 
spot of the preceding down. 

For side which did not put the ball in play, 
loss of 10 yards from point where ball was 
put in play and first down to ensue. 

If neither side is in possession of the ball, 
same as free ball. 

Section 3. Players of the side which put 
the ball in play after they have crossed the 
line of scrimmage may not in any way in- 
terfere with their opponents until the ball 
has been touched by a player of either side 
beyond the line of scrimmage, except— 

I. As bona fide interferers in an attempt 
to advance the ball by a rush. 

II. In an actual attempt to catch a for- 
ward pass. (See Section 2. ) 

III. After they have advanced 20 yards 
beyond the scrimmage line, in which case 
they may use their hands or arms to push 
opponents out of the way in order to get at 
the ball or the man carrying it. 

NOTE.— A player shall not be considered 
as having crossed the line of scrimmage until 
he has actually got by opponents who are on 
the defensive line of scrimmage. 

PENALTY (Umpire, Field Judge) 

Same as stated under Section 2 above. 
Part I. 

Section 4. Players of the side which did 
not put the ball in play shall not in any way 
interfere with their opponents after they 
(opponents) have crossed the line of scrim- 
mage until the ball has been touched by a 
player of either side beyond the line of 
scrimmage, except — 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 107 

RULE XVIII. 

I. In a bona fide attempt to get at the 
man carrying the ball. 

II. In an actual attempt to catch a for- 
ward pass. (See Section 2.) 

III. In case of a kick, after their oppon- 
ents have advanced 20 yards beyond the 
line of scrimmage, in which case they may 
use their hands or arms to push opponents 
out of the way in order to get at the ball, 
or their arms close to their bodies, in order 
to obstruct an opponent from getting at 
a player carrying it. 

PENALTY (Umpire, Field Judge) 

Same as under Section 2. Part II. 

NOTE. — Another way to express Rule 
XVIII. , Sections 3 and U, follows: 

SECTION 3.— I. If the side in possession of the ball 
kicks, no players of said side who have crossed the line of 
scrimmage shall in any manner interfere with an opponent 
until they (offensive side) have advanced 29 yards beyond 
the line of scrimmage. 

II. If the side in possession of the ball makes a forward 
pass no players of said side who have crossed the line of 
scrimmage shall in any manner interfere with an opponent 
until the ball is touched, except in an actual attempt to catch 
said pass themselves. 

III. If the side in possession of the ball attempts to 
advance the ball by rushing, the restrictions (in L and II.) 
above do not govern. 

SECTION 4.— I. If the side in possession of the ball 
kicks, no players of the side not in possession of the ball 
shall in any manner interfere with their opponents who have 
crossed the line of scrimmage until said opponents have ad- 
vanced 20 yards beyond the line of scrimmage. 

II. If the side in possession of the ball makes a for- 
ward pass no players of the side not in possession of the 
ball shall in any manner interfere with their opponents who 
have crossed the line of scrimmage until the ball is touched, 
except in an actual attempt to catch the ball themselves. 

III. If the side in possession of the ball attempts to 
advance the ball by rushing, the restrictions (in I. and II.) 



108 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XVIII. 

above shall not be interpreted in sncb a way as to prohibit 
the defensive back field from using their hands on their 
opponents' bodies in a bona fide attempt to get at the man 
with the ball. 

Section 5. (a) Players of the side not in 
possession of the ball may use their hands 
and arms in tackling the player who is 
carrying the ball. 

(h) Players of the side which did not put 
the ball in play shall not tackle nor in any 
way hold opponents except in an actual 
attempt to tackle the player who is carry- 
ing the ball. 

PENALTY (Umpire, Field Judge) 

Loss of 5 yards. 

Holding and Section 6. Except as provided in Section 

unlawful use of 1, all holding and the use of the hands and 

hands and arms, arms by a player of the side which put the 

ball in play in obstructing an opponent, 

except with the arms close to the body, is 

prohibited. This prohibition includes : 

(a) Grasping an opponent with the hands 
or arms. 

(6) Placing the hands upon an opponent 
to push him away from the play. 

(c) Encircling in any degree any part of 
the opponent with the arm. 

(d) Using the arms in any way to lift 
an opponent in blocking. 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

For side in possession of ball— Loss of 15 
yards. 

For side not in possession of ball— Loss 
of 5 yards. 

If neither side is in possession— See Rule 
XXVL, Section 5. 
(See illustrations Nos. 12-27. Pages 145-149 ) 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GC1DE, l(# 

RULE XIX. 

PASSING OR THROWING THE BALL. 

Section 1. Any player may, at any time, Backward pass, 
pass or throw the ball in any direction ex- 
cept toward his opponents' goal. A back- 
ward pass by the snapper-back on the first 
or second down, that goes out of bounds 
before touching a player of either side, 
shall belong (at the point where the ball 
crossed the side line) to the side first re- 
covering it. 

(See Rule XXI., Sections 1 and 2, Pages 114.) 

Section 2. The ball may not be passed Forward pass 
or thrown toward the opponents' goal by a by side not put- 
player of the side that did not put the ball ting ball in play, 
in play from a scrimmage. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

If such illegal forward pass is made, the of- 
fending side shall put the ball in play by a 
scrimmage at a point 15 yards directly back 
of the spot from which the pass was made 
The ensuing down shall be the first down 

Section 3. A player of the side which put 
the ball in play from a scrimmage may pass 
or throw the ball toward the opponents' 
goal under the following restrictions : 

(a) A forward pass may cross the line of Forward pass 
scrimmage at any point, but the player crossing scrim- 
making the pass must be at least 5 yards mage line illegal 
back of said line when pass is made. unless— 

PENALTY (Referee) 

If such offense occurs before a "third down" 
has been declared (i. e., if it occurs during 
a play following either a first or second 
down) the offending side shall put the ball 
in play at the spot of the preceding down 
and the play shall count as a down The 
point to be gained shall remain the same. 



110 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XIX. 

If, however, such offense occurs after a 
third down has been declared (i. e., if it 
occurs during a play following a third down), 
the ball shall go to the opponents at the 
spot of the preceding down. 

Forward pass (6) A forward pass that crosses a line 

illegal if more 20 yards in advance of the spot where the 

than 20 yards, ball was put in play before touching the 

ground or a player, is illegal, and becomes 

dead as it crosses the line. 

PENALTY (Field Judge) 

The same as stated under Section 3 (a). 

Second forward (c) Only one forward pass may be made 
pass illegal, in each scrimmage. A second forward pass 
in the same scrimmage is illegal. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

The same as stated under Section 3 (a). 

Forward pass Section 4. If the ball, after having 
striking ground, been legally passed forward, strikes the 
ground within the field of play either before 
or after having been touched by a player of 
either side, the pass shall not be considered 
as completed. 

PENALTY (Field Judge) 

For such uncompleted pass the same as 
under Section 3 (a). 

Players who Section 5. (a) After the ball has been 
may receive legally passed forward, it may first be 
forward pass, touched only by such players of the passer's 
side as were at the time the ball was put in 
play at least 1 yard behind the line of 
scrimmage or were playing at either end 
of the said line. 

(See Note 23. Page 142.) 
PENALTY (Referee, Field Judge) 

A ball thus illegally touched or recovered 



SPAIJUXG'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. m 

RULE X!X ; 

sha.i go to the opponents at the spot where 
the fcui occurred, unless the foul occurred 
inside of the opponents' 10-yard line, in 
which case the ball shall go as a Touch- 
back to the offended side. 
{For Ball Crossing Goal Line, see Section S, Page 112.) 

If a forward pass is first touched by 
any illegal player of the passer's side the 
pass shall not be considered as completed. 

PENALTY (Field Judge. 

For such uncompleted pass the ball shall 
go to the opponents on the spot of the 
preceding down. 

(b) Any player of the side that did not 
make the forward pass has full right to 
touch and to attempt to secure possession 
of the ball. 

(c) When the ball has been legally passed 
forward and has been legally touched, 
before striking the ground, by any player 
of the side not making the pass, any 
player of either side has the right to 
attempt to secure possession of the ball. 

Section 6. If the ball, after having Forward pass 
been legally passed forward, goes out of out of bounds, 
bounds before it touches the ground and 
before it has been touched by a player of 
either side, it shall belong to the opponents 
at the point where the ball crossed the 

Side line. (Field j: 

Section 7. If the ball, after having Forward pass 
been legally passed forward, crosses the goal crossing goal 
line on the fly or strikes the uprights or line on the fly. 
cross-bar before it has been touched by a 
player on either side, it becomes dead, and 



112 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



RULE XIX. 

shall count as a touchback to the defenders 
of the goal. (Fibld judge > 

(See Note 20, Page 141.) 

Forward past Section 8. If the ball, after having been 

crossing goal legally passed forward and legally touched 

!me after being by any player, crosses the goal line either 

legally touched, in the air or rolling on the ground, or 

strikes the uprights or cross-bar, it becomes 

dead, and shall count as a touchback for the 

defenders of the goal. (field jodqe) 

Batting the ball. Section 9. A player may at any time bat 
the ball in any direction except toward his 
opponents' goal. 

PENALTY (Umpire, Field Judge) 

Loss of ball to the offended side on the 
spot where the foul occurred. 

Section 10. A forward pass which crosses 
the line of scrimmage must be made from 
a point at least 5 yards behind the line of 
scrimmage. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

Same as stated under Section 3 (a). 



RULE XX. 

OFF-SIDE AND ON-SIDE. 

Off-side. Section 1. A player is put off-side if the 
ball in play has last been touched by one of 
his own side behind him. No player, how- 
ever, may be called off-side behind his own 
goal line, nor when holding the ball for a 
place-kick after a fair catch or touchdown. 
When off-side Section 2. A player may at all times re- 
player may ceive the ball from another of his own side 
touch ball, who is in front of him, and any player may 
recover the ball on a fumble or a muff, but 
in no other instance shall a player when off- 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 113 

RULE XX, 

side touch the ball. [Apparent violations of 
the off-side rule by players attempting either 
legally or illegally to receive a forward pass 
are to be judged solely under the provisions 
of Rule XIX.] 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

When an off-side player within hie oppo- 
nents' 10-yard iine is touched by a ball kicked 
by one of his own side — Touchback for de- 
fenders of goal. 

In ail other cases— ball to go to the oppo- 
nents on the spot where the foul occurred. 

Section 3. Any player being off-side is When baJ 
put on-side when the ball has touched an touches o PP o- 
opponent. nent 

Section 4. A player of the side which put Players put 
the ball in play being off-side is put on-side on-side when 
when a legally kicked ball touches the kicked ball 
ground in the field of play 20 yards in ad- touches ground, 
vance of the spot where the ball was put in 
play. No player of either side may further Kicked ball on 
kick or kick at such a ball while on the ground not to 

ground Or bounding. (Field Judge) be kicked 

PENALTY FOR FURTHER KICKING again. 

Same as under Rule XIX., Section 3a 
(Read "Kick" for "Pass"). (See Rule XXVI, 
Section 5.) 
(See Note 18. page 141.) 

Section 5. The player who, standing back Kicker though 
of his own line of scrimmage, receives the on-side may 
ball from one of his own side and then kicks not recover 
it beyond the line of scrimmage may not ball, 
himself get the ball until after it has touched 
one of his opponents. 

PENALTY (Field Judge) 

Loss of ball to opponents at spot where 
foul occurred. 



114 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XX. 

Section 6. A kick other than a kick-off, 
kick-out, a free kick or return kick must 
be made from a point at least 5 yards be- 
hind the line of scrimmage. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

Same as under Rule XIX., Section 3a 
(Read "Kick" for "Pass' 5 ). 

RULE XXL 
NECESSARY GAIN ON DOWNS. 
1 yards in Section 1. If in three consecutive downs 
3 downs, (unless the ball shall have crossed the goaL 
line) , a team having constantly had the balL 
in its possession, shall not have advanced 
the ball 10 yards, it shall go to the oppo- 
nents on the spot of the fourth down, ex- 
cept as provided in Section 2. 

(See Note 2, Page 139.) 

Continuity of Section 2. The ball shall not be con- 
downs broken, sidered as having been ' ' constantly in 
possession": 

(a) When the ball, after having passed 
into the actual possession and control of the 
other side is recovered before it is declared 
dead by the Referee. 

(b) When the ball has been kicked and the 
opponents given a fair and equal chance of 
gaining possession of it. No kick shall be 
regarded as having given the opponents 
such chance unless it shall have crossed 
the line of scrimmage or shall have been 
touched by an opponent. 

Position of Section 3. The forward point of the ball in 

ball in measur- its position when declared dead, and not its 

ing. center shall be taken as the determining 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 115 

RULE XXI. 

point in measuring; and the Referee shall 
not rotate the ball before measuring its for- 
ward point. 

RULE XXII. 

NECESSARY DISTANCE ON KICK. 

Section 1. In the case of a kick-off, kick- ] q yards 
out or kick from a fair catch, the ball must on kj c k. 
be kicked a distance of at least 10 yards 
toward the opponents' goal line from the 
line restraining the player making the kick, 
unless it is touched by an opponent ; other- 
wise the ball is not in play. 

RULE XXIII. 

TRY AT GOAL. 

Section 1. A side which has made a pi aC e-kicL 
touchdown shall try at goal by a place-kick, 
either direct or preceded by a punt-out. 

(For Position of Players, see Ruiz XI., Page 95, and Rule XII. , 
Page 95.) 

RULE XXIV. 

CONDUCT OF PLAYERS. 

Section 1. There shall be no striking Striking, 
with the fist or elbows, kneeing, kicking, kneeing, 
meeting with the knee, nor striking with kicking, 
the locked hands by line men when they 
are breaking through; nor shall a player on 
defense strike in the face with the heel of 
the hand the opponent who is carrying 
trie Dan. , r eferee> umpire, \ 

PENALTY \Field Judge, Linesman/ 

For violation of any part of Section 1— Dis- 
qualification and loss by offending team of 
one-haif the distance to its own goal line. 

(See Note Ik, Page 141. See illustrations Nos. 28 and 29, 
Page 149.) 



113 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XXIV. 

Running into, Section 2. There shall be no running into 
" roughing the or otherwise roughly treating the player 
full-back/' receiving and kicking the ball as described 
in Rule XX. , Section 5. 

oc Ki a i -rv ( Referee, Umpire, \ 

rtNALlY VField Judge, Linesman/ 

Disqualification. 
(See Notes 8 and U, Pages 140, 141.) 

Piling up. Section 3. There shall be no piling up on 
the player after the Referee has declared 
the ball dead. 

PENALTY ( Referee, Umpire, \ 

Loss of 15 yards. VField Judge, Linesman/ 

Hurdling. Section 4. There shall be no hurdling. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

Loss of 15 yards from spot where foul 
occurred; the point to be gained and num- 
ber of down to remain unchanged. 
(For definition see Rule VI., Page 88, Section 15.) 

Tripping, Section 5. There shall be no tripping, 
tackling out or* tackling the runner when clearly out of 
bounds, bounds, or any other acts of unnecessary 
unnecessary roughness. (The throwing to the ground 
roughness, of the player with the ball after the ball 
has been declared dead may be deemed un- 
necessary roughness.) 

dc ma i xv ( Referee, Umpire, \ 

rclMALI Y VField Judge, Linesman/ 

In case of tripping by the side which put 

the ball in play— Loss of 15 yards from the 

spot where the foul was made; the point 

to be gained and the number of down to 

remain unchanged. 

In all other cases— Loss of 15 yards. 

(For definition of Tripping, see Rule VI., Page 88, Section U.) 

Crawling. Section 6. There shall be no crawling 
by the man in possession of the ball. 

/Referee, Umpire A 
PENALTY \ Field Judge ) 

Loss of 5 yards. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 117 

RULE XXIV. 

Section 7. There shall be no unsports- Unsportsman- 
manlike conduct on the part of the players, like conduct. 
This shall include the use of abusive or in- Abusive 
suiting language to opponents or officials, language. 
Concealing the ball beneath the clothing or 
substituting any article for the ball shall be 
deemed unsportsmanlike conduct. 

/ Referee, Umpire, \ 
PENALTY V Field Judge, Linesman/ 

Suspension for the remainder of the game. 

Section 8. (a) A player when tackling Flying tackle, 
an opponent must have one foot at least on 
the ground. 

(b) There shall be no tackling below the Tackling below 
knees, except by the men on the line of the knees, 
scrimmage on the defense, and of these, 
the two men occupying the positions on the 
ends of the line of scrimmage may not 
tackle below the knees. 

(Referee, Umpire, \ 
Field Judge, Linesman/ 

Loss of 5 yards from spot where foul oc- 
curred. 

(See illustration No, SO, Page 149.) 

Section 9. If a team on the defense com- Playing for 
mits fouls so near their own goal that these penalties to 
fouls are punishable only by the halving of delay game. 
the distance to the line, the object being, 
in the opinion of the Referee, to delay the 
game, the. offending side shall be regarded 
as refusing to allow the game to proceed. 
The Referee shall in such case warn the of- 
fending side once, and if the offense is re- 
peated, he shall declare the game forfeited 
to the opponents. 

(See Rule XXVI. , Page. 120, Section 6.) 



118 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XXIV. 

Unfair play. Section 10. In case the play is interfered 
with by some act palpably unfair and not 
elsewhere provided for in these rules, either 
the Referee or Umpire shall have the 
power to award 5 yards to the offended 
side, the number of the down and the point 
to be gained being determined as provided 
in Rule XXVI. 

RULE XXV. 

CONDUCT OF PERSONS OTHER THAN 
PLAYERS. 

Side line Section 1. There shall be no coaching, 
coaching, either by substitutes or by any other per- 
son not participating in the game. 

NOTE. — The Committee would point out 
that every effort should be made to prevent 
this, as the practice is not in the best inter- 
est of the sport , Referee , Umpire , x 

PENALTY V Field Judge, Linesman/ 

Loss of 15 yards by the side for whose sup- 
posed benefit the offense was committed, 
the point to be gained and number of 
down to remain unchanged. 

If the ball was dead when the offense oc- 
curred the penalty will be enforced from 
that spot. 

!f the ball was in play when the offense 
occurred the penalty will be enforced from 
the spot where the ball was put in play. 

The offender shall be excluded from the 
neighborhood of the field of play for the 
remainder of the game. 
(See Note IS, Page 141.) 

Attendance on Section 2. In case of accident to a player, 

injured player, one representative of the player's team 

may, if he has first obtained the consent 

of the Referee, come upon the field of play 

to attend to the injured player, and this 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 119 

RULE XXV. 

representative need not always be the same 
person. (Refekee) 

Section 3. No person other than the Person* allowed 
players, the officials, the representatives on field of play, 
above mentioned in Section 2, or an in- 
coming substitute, shall at any time come 
upon the field of play without permission 
of the Referee. 

PENALTY (Referee, Umpire, Field Judge) 

Loss of 15 yards by the side whoso man 
committed the offense, the point to be 
gained and the number of down to remain 
unchanged. 

The spot from which the penalty shall be 
enforced will b© determined as under penalty 
for breach of Section 1 . 

Section 4. Only three men shall be al- Persons allowed 
lowed to walk up and down on each side of to walk up and 
the field. The rest, including substitutes, down on side 
water carriers, and all who are admitted lines, 
within the enclosure, must be seated 
throughout the game. 

PENALTY (Referee, Umpire, Field Judge) 

Loss of 15 yards by the side whose man 
committed the offence; the point to be 
gained and the number of the down to re- 
main unchanged. 

The spot from which the penalty shall be 
enforced will be determined as under penalty 
for breach of Section 1. 

RULE XXVI. 

ENFORCEMENT OF PENALTIES. 

(GOVERNING ALL CASES NOT OTHERWISE 
SPECIFICALLY PROVIDED FOR.) 

Section 1. Penalties for fouls commit- Spot from 
ted by players shall be enforced from the which enforced, 
spot where the foul was committed. 



120 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XXV!. 

Penalties for fouls committed by persons 
other than players will be enforced as speci- 
fically provided under Rule XXV. , Page 118. 

Ball after dis- Section 2. If a foul is committed by the 

lance penalty not side which put the ball in play, and the dis- 

in advance of tance penalty does not leave the ball in 

point necessary advance of the point necessary for first 

for first down in down when the ball was last put in play, 

previous play, the down and point to be gained for first 

down shall remain the same as they were 

at the beginning of the scrimmage during 

which the foul occurred. 

Ball after Section 3. If a foul is committed by the 

distance penalty side which put the ball in play after a gain 

in advance of of such a length that the distance penalty 

point necessary leaves the ball in advance of the point 

for first down necessary for first down when the ball was 

in previous play, last put in play, the ensuing down shall be 

counted first down with 10 yards to gain. 

First down Section 4. If a foul is committed by the 

when offending side ivhich did not put the ball in play, the 

side not in pos- scrimmage after a distance penalty shall be 

session of ball, counted as first down. 

(See Note 22, Page 142.) 

First down Section 5. If a foul is committed by a 
when neither player when neither side is in possession of 
side in posses- the ball, the ball shall go to the offended 
sion of ball, side as first down at point of the foul. 

Foul within Section 6. If a foul is committed within 

1 -yard line, the 1-yard line and the distance penalty if 

enforced would carry the ball across the 

goal line, one-half the remaining distance 

to the goal line shall be given. 

(See Rule XXIV., Page 117. Section 9.) 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 121 

RULE XXVI. 

SECTION 7. If a foul, following a first or Distance penalty 

second down, except a foul involving dis- carrying ball 
qualification of a player, is committed by inside 1-yard 
the side in possession of the ball while the line or across 
ball is behind their goal line or in flight from goal line. 
a kick or forward pass delivered from be- 
hind their goal line, the play shall count as a 
down and the ball shall be put in play upon 
the 1-yard line; if such foul occur following 
a third down the Referee shall declare a 
safety in favor of the offended side. If a 
foul is committed by the side not in posses- 
sion of the ball while the ball is behind their 
opponents' goal line or in flight from a kick 
or pass delivered behind that goal line the 
Referee shall declare a touchback in favor 
of the offended side. 

Section 8. In case one official signals a One official 
foul against one side and another official penalizing one 
signals a foul against the other side on the side, another 
same play, the penalties being other than official the other 
disqualification, the ball shall be brought side on same 
back to the point where it was put in play play, 
and be played over again, the number of 
the down and the point to be gained for 
first down remaining the same. 

(See Section 10, Page 121.) 

Section 9. In case officials signal dif- More than one 
f erent fouls against the same side during official penaliz- 
the same play, only one penalty shall be ing same side on 
inflicted, but the offended side shall have same play, 
the right to elect which of the fouls shall 
be penalized. 

Section 10. In case of disqualification by Disqualification 
any official, the disqualification may not be always enforced. 



122 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XXVI. 

declined by the offended side, nor may the 
distance penalty accompanying it be offset 
by a foul by the other side, unless such 
foul is also punishable by disqualification, 

(See Section 8, Page 121.) 

Refusal of Section 11. Penalties for all other fouls 
penalties, (except for penalties under Rule XIX. ) 
may be declined by the offended side, in 
which case the play shall proceed exactly 
as if no foul had been committed. A 
penalty which includes disqualification 
may be thus declined, but the disqualified 
player must leave the game. 

RULE XXVII. 

Section 1. The officials of the game shall 
be a Referee, an Umpire, a Field Judge and 
a Linesman. 

It is the opinion of the Rules Committee 
that it is contrary to the best interests of 
the game for teams to dispense with the 
services of any one of the four officials 
provided for under the rules. 

RULE XXVIII. 

DUTIES OF THE REFEREE. 

Section 1. The Referee shall have general 
oversight and control of the game. He 
shall be sole authority for the score and 
sole judge of forfeiture of the game under 
the rules. 

(See Section S, Page 123.) 
(See Note 26, Page 142.) 

Section 2. The decision of the Referee 
I upon all matters not specifically designated 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 123 

RULE XXVIil. 

under the duties of other officials shall be 
final. 

Sections. In making his decisions the 
Referee must recognize and allow prece- 
dence to any penalty declared by the 
Umpire. 

Section 4. The Referee may appeal to 
any of the other officials for testimony upon 
points within his jurisdiction. 

Section 5. He must report to the Um- 
pire any infringement of certain indicated 
sections of Rule XXIV. , Page 115, and Rule 
XXV. , Page 118, and all cases of holding 
or unlawful use of hands or arms which 
come under his observation. He shall also 
report the fact to the Umpire when the ball 
is kicked into the line or players of the 
kicker's own side. 

Section 6. It is the special province of 
the Referee to see that the ball is properly 
put in play, and except as otherwise pro- 
vided, he shall be sole judge of its position 
and progress. 

Section 7. At every kick-off and in every 
case when time has been taken out, before 
ordering play to begin, the Referee shall — 

(a) Ascertain from each captain that his 
team is ready; and, 

(b) Make sure that the other officials are 
ready. 

Section 8. The Referee shall be respon- 
sible for the enforcement of the following 
rules : 



124 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUjBE. 

RULE XXVIII. 

BRIEF OF RULES. 

(WHERE REFEREE HAS JURISDICTION.) 

Rule I. — Field. 

Section 1 — Dimensions. 
Section 2— Marking. 
Section 3 — Goal. 

Rule II. — Ball. 

Rule III. — Players and Substitutes. 
Section 1 — Number of Players. 
Section 2— Substitutes. 

Rule IV. — Length of Game. 

Section 1 — Length of periods. 
Section 2 — Intermission. 
Section 3 — Darkness. 
Section 4— Time extended. 

Rule V, — Scoring. 

Rule VI. — Definitions. 

Section 1— Methods of kicking the ball. 

Section 2— Snapping the ball. 

Section 3— Scrimmage. 

Section 6 — A down occurs. 

Section 7 — Touchdown. 

Section 8— Touchback. 

Section 9 — Safety. 

Section 10— Goal from Touchdown. 

Section 11— Goal from the Field. 

Section 13— Out of bounds. 

Section 15— Hurdling. 

Section 16— Crawling. 

Section 17— The ball is dead. 

Rule VII. — Kick- Off. 

Section 1 — Team entitled to kick-off. 
Section 2— Ball crossing goal line. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 125 

RULE XXVIII. 

Rule VIII. — Position of Players at Scrimmage 
Section 2— Snapper-back. 
Section 3— Five centre men to be on line 
Section 4— One player in motion. 

Eule IX. — Position of Players at Kick-off. 

Section 1— Kicker. 
Eule X. — Position of Players at Kick-out. 

Section 1 — Kicker. 

Section 2— No player in possession of the ball 
to cross restraining line. 

Section 3— Ball not to touch ground. 
Eule XI. — Position of Players at Punt-out. 

Section 1 — Punter. 

Eule XII. — Position of Players at Place-kick fob 
Goal After Touchdown. 
Section 1— Kicker. 

Section 2 — No player in possession of the ball 
to cross restraining line. 
Eule XIII. — Position of Players on Free-kick After 
Fair Catch Other Than Fair Catch 
From Punt-out. 
Section 1— Kicker. 
Section 2 — No player in possession of the ball 

to cross restraining line. 
Section 3 — Ball not to touch ground. 
Eule XV. — Putting the Ball in Play. 

Section 1 — By scrimmage unless otherwise 

provided. 
Section 2— After fair catch. 
Section 3— After a foul, not until. 
Section 4— Guard running with ball. 
Section 5— Feint to snap the ball. 
Section 6— Feints by players of side on offense 
other than snapper-back. 



126 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XXVIII. 

Section 7— After out of bounds on kick-off. 

Section 8— After out of bounds at kick-out. 

Section" 9 — After out of bounds except at kick- 
off and kick-out. 

Section 10— Walking in with ball after out of 
bounds. 

Section 12 — Ball touching ground at try-at-goal 
to go as kick-off. 

Section 13 — After try-at-goal ball to go as kick- 
off. 

Section 14— On failure of fair-catch at punt- 
out ball to go as kick-off. 

Section 15— Option after touchback. 

Eule XVI. — Delay of Game. 

Section 1 — Time taken out, when. 
Section 2— Ball out of bounds. 
Section 3 — By request of captains. 

By order of Referee. 
Section 4 — No delay more than two minutes. 

Eule XVII. — Unlawful Interference With Play. 

Section 1— Interference with snapper-back or 
ball. 

Section 3— Ball scrimmaged by kick forward 
not to be touched until. 

Section 6— Pushing and pulling and inter- 
locked interference. 

Eule XVIII. — Obstruction of Opponent by Use op 
Hands and Arms After the Ball Is 
Put In Play. 
Section 5 — Holding and unlawful use of hands 

and arms. 
(The Referee shall report to the Umpire any 
infractions of this section which come under 
his observation.) 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 127 

RULE XXVIII. 

JRule XIX. — Passing or Throwing the Ball. 
Section 1 — Backward pass. 
Section 2 — Forward pass by side not putting 

the ball in play. 
Section 3— Illegal forward passes: 

(a) Passer must be 5 yards back of 

scrimmage line, 
(c) A second forward pass in the same 
scrimmage. 
Section 5 — Players who may receive forward 
pass: 

(a) Only players one yard back of line. 

(b) Any player on opponents' side. 
Section 10— Pass made 5 yards back of scrim- 
mage line. 

IRule XX.— Off-side and On-side. 

Section 6— Kick must be from behind line 5 
yards back of scrimmage. 

Rule XXI. — Necessary Gain on Downs. 

Section 1 — 10 yards in three downs. 
Section 2 — Continuity of downs broken. 
Section 3 — Position of ball in measuring. 

Rule XXII. — Necessary Distance on a Kick. 

Section 1 — 10 yards necessary in case of kick- 
off, kick-out, or kick from fair 
catch. 

:Eule XXIII.— Try-at-Goal. 

Section 1— Must be place-kick. 

IRule XXIV. — Conduct of Players. 

(The Referee shall report to the Umpire infrac- 
tions of the following sections of Rule XXIV. , 
Page 115): 

Section 1 — Striking, kneeing, kicking, etc. 
Section 2—' 'Roughing the full-back. " 



328 SPALEING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XXVIII. 

Section 3— Piling up. 

Section 5— Tripping, tackling out of bounds, 

etc. 
Section 6 — Crawling. 
Section 7— Unsportsmanlike conduct. 
Section 8 — Tackling. 

(The Referee shall have exclusive jurisdiction 
over the following sections of Rule XXIV., 
Page 115) : 

Section 4— Hurdling. 

Section 9— Play for penalties to delay game. 
(Under the following section of Rule XXIV. the 
Referee shall have concurrent jurisdiction with 
the Umpire): 
Section 10 — Unfair play. 

Eule XXV. — Conduct of Persons Other Than 
Players. 
(The Referee shall report to the Umpire infrac- 
tions of the following sections of Rule XXV., 
Page 118): 

Section 1 — Coaching from the side lines. 
Section 3— Persons allowed on field of play. 
Section 4— Persons allowed to walk along side 

lines. 
(Referee has exclusive jurisdiction under the 
following section of Rule XXV. , Page 118) : 
Section 2— Attendance on injured player. 

RULE XXIX. 

DUTIES OF THE UMPIRE. 

Section 1. The Umpire shall be judge of 
the conduct and position of the players, 
and his decision shall be final regarding 
such fouls as are not specifically placed 
within the jurisdiction of the Referee or 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 129 

RULE XXIX. 

the Field Judge. He shall also keep the 
time and shall use a stop-watch for this 
purpose. He should start the watch not 
when the Referee blows his whistle, but 
when the ball is put in play. 

(By agreement the teams may transfer 
rulings on off-side in the line to the head 
linesman. ) 

Section 2. Under Rule XXIV., Page 115, 
and Rule XXV., Page 118, other officials 
are given concurrent jurisdiction in cases 
of certain fouls. Such fouls, and all fouls 
signalled by the Field Judge, must be 
reported to the Umpire, who shall there- 
upon enforce the penalty. 

Section 3. The Umpire shall signal all 
fouls with a horn or bell, and the play shall 
continue until the ball is declared dead by 
the Referee. 

Section 4. If during any play the Umpire 
has signalled a foul or had reported to him 
any foul by another official he shall 

(a) In case the foul does not involve the 
loss of the ball or the manner in which ©r 
place where the ball shall be put in play, 
notify the Referee and forthwith enforce 
the penalty; or, 

. (6) In case the penalty involves loss of 
the ball or manner in which or place where 
it shall be put in play, indicate to the 
Referee the spot where the foul was 
committed, from which spot the Referee 
shall enforce the penalty. 

Section 5. The Umpire may appeal to 



130 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XXIX. 

any of the other officials for testimony ins 
cases of fouls seen by them. 

Section 6. The Umpire shall be respons- 
ible for the enforcement of the following 
rules: 

BRIEF OF RULES. 

(WHERE UMPIRE HAS JURISDICTION.) 
Rule III. — Players and Substitutes. 

Section 3— Equipment of players. Devices 
for protection, etc. 
Rule VI. — Definitions. 

Section 3— The line of scrimmage. 

Section 4 — Off-side. 

Section 14— Tripping. 
Rule VIII. — Position of Players at Scrimmage. 

Section 1 — Seven players on line ; locking legs. 

Section 2 — No player ahead of scrimmage line. 
Rule IX. — Position of Players at Kick-off. 

Section 2— Kicker's side behind the ball. 

Section 3— Opponents behind restraining line. 
Rule X. — Position of Players at Kick-out. 

Section 4— Kicker's side behind the ball. 

Section 5— Opponents behind restraining line 
until. 
Rule XL — Position of Players at Punt-out. 

Section 2 — Punter's side behind restraining 
line. 

Section 3 — Opponents behind their restraining 
line. 
Rule XII. — Position of Players at Place-kick for 
Goal After Touchdown. 

Section 3— Kicker's side behind the ball. 

Section 4— Opponents behind goal line. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 131 

RULE XXIX. 

Eule XIII. — Position of Players on Feee-kick After 
Fair Catch (Other Than Fair Catch 
From Punt-out). 
Section 4— Kicker's side behind the ball. 
Section 5— Opponents behind restraining line 
until. 

Eule XIV. — Players Out of Bounds. 

Section 1 — No player except kicker and holder 
of ball. 

Eule XVII. — Unlawful Interference With Play. 

Section 2 — Interference with opponents on 
scrimmage line. 

Eule XVIII. — Obstruction of Opponents by Use of 
Hands and Arms After the Ball Is 
Put in Play. 
Section 1 — Player running with ball. 
Section 2— Player in act of catching forward 

pass. 
Section 3— Players of side that put ball in play. 
Section 4 — Players of side which did not put 

ball in play. 
Section 5— Players of side not in possession of 

ball— Tackling. 
Section 6— Holding and unlawful use of hands 
and arms. 

Rule XIX.— Passing or Throwing the Ball. 
Section 9— Batting the ball. 

Rule XX.— Off-side and On-side. 

Section 1— Players off-side when. 
Section 2— Off-side player may touch ball 
when. 



132 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XXIX. 

Section 3— Off-side player is put on-side when 
ball has touched opponent. 

Section 4 — When kicked ball touches the 
ground in field of play. 

Section 5— Kicker, though on-side, may not 
recover ball. 

Rule XXIV. — Conduct of Playeks. 

Section 1 — Striking, kneeing, kicking, etc. 
Section 2— ' 'Roughing the full-back. ' ' 
Section 3— Piling up. 
Section 5 — Tripping, tackling out of bounds, 

etc. 
Section 6— Crawling. 
Section 7— Unsportsmanlike conduct. 
Section 8 — Tackling. 
Section 10 — Unfair play otherwise unprovided 

for. 

Rule XXV. — Conduct of Persons Other Than 
Players. 
Section 1— Side line coaching. 
Section 3— Persons allowed on field of play. 
Section 4 — Persons allowed on side line. 



RULE XXX. 

DUTIES OF THE FIELD JUDGE. 

NOTE. — In order that the line 20 yards 
in advance of the scrimmage line may at all 
times be the more readily ascertained, it is 
suggested that the Field Judge mark with 
some light colored object that may be dropped 
on the field of play and shall not be injurious 
to the players, a point 20 yards in advance 
of the ball after every down. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 133 

RULE XXX. 

Section 1. The Field Judge will generally 
occupy a position back of the team not 
in possession of the ball and nearest to 
the side of the field opposite from the Lines- 
man, at the same time taking his position 
not far from the point marked as defining 
the 20-yard zone. Generally speaking, he 
will relieve the Referee of some of the 
Referee's duties in this part of the field 
and also observe and report fouls which 
otherwise might not come to the attention 
of the Umpire. 

Section 2. He shall signal with a horn all 
violations of rules covering holding, inter- 
ference and conduct of players which he 
observes on any part of the field and shall 
forthwith report them to the Umpire. 

Section 3. He shall have, as assistant to 
the Referee, jurisdiction over the ball and 
over interference and other fouls in con- 
nection with the catching, securing or pos- 
session of the ball when it has been kicked 
or passed down the field. This will include 
all rulings in connection with the conduct 
of the players within the " twenty-yard 
zone, " and with a fair catch and the touch- 
ing of the ball by any player after a kick 
or forward pass and the possession of the 
ball which has been kicked or passed down 
the field. 

He shall not declare such rulings, but 
shall report them direct to the Referee. 

Section 4. He shall notify the captains 
of the time remaining for play not more 
than ten nor less than five minutes before 



134 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XXX. 

the end of each half. He may, upon in- 
quiry, give the approximate remaining 
time to a captain at any time during the 
game, provided he does not comply with 
such a request more than three times during 
the last five minutes of the half. 

Section 5. He shall mark the point where 
the ball goes out of bounds on the opposite 
side of the field from that on which the 
Linesman is stationed, and designate this 
point to the Referee. 

Section 6. On all attempts at a goal from 
the field or after touchdown, he shall take 
a position under the goal posts, and if called 
upon by the Referee to do so, shall assist 
the Referee in making his decision. 

Section 7. By holding up his hand he 
shall indicate to the Referee when to blow 
the whistle on all decisions under his juris- 
diction. 

Section 8. The Field Judge shall have, 
in assisting the Referee and the Umpire, 
jurisdiction in connection with the follow- 
ing rules: 

BRIEF OF RULES. 

(WHERE FIELD JUDGE HAS JURISDICTION FOR THE 

PURPOSE OF ASSISTING REFEREE AND 

UMPIRE.) 

Rule VI.— DEFINITIONS. 

Section 5 — Fair catch; not a fair catch; mark 
of the catch; opportunity to make 
a fair catch. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 135 

RULE XXX. 

Section 6— A down occurs. 

(c) Ball out of bounds on side opposite 

from Linesman. 
(e) Forward pass touching the ground. 
Section 8— Touchback when kicked ball 

crosses goal, etc. 
Section 10— Goal from touchdown. 
Section 11— Goal from field. 
Section 17— The ball is dead. 

(6) When fair catch has been made. 

(d) When ball goes out of bounds after 
a kick. (On side opposite Lines- 
man.) 

(e) When player carrying the ball goes 
out of bounds. (On side opposite 
Linesman. ) 

(/) Forward pass crossing goal line 
on fly. 

(g) Forward pass crossing goal line 
after being legally touched. 

(h) Kicked ball crossing goal line be- 
fore being touched by player. 

Eulb VII.— Kick-Off. 

Section 2 — Ball kicked across goal line, 

Eule XV. — Putting the Ball in Play. 

Section 11 — When catcher takes more than two 
steps after making fair catch. 

Eule XVII. — Unlawful Interference With Play. 

Section 3— Opponents not to interfere with 

opportunity for fair catch. 
Section 4— Maker of fair catch not to be 

thrown. 
Section 6— Signal for fair catch protects only 

the player signalling. 



136 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XXX. 

Eule XVIII. — Obstruction of Opponents by Use of 
Hands and Arms After the Ball Is 
Put In Play. 
Section 2 — Player catching forward pass. 
Section 3 — Players of side which put ball in 

play. 
Section 4 — Players of side which did not put 

ball in play. 
Section 5— Tackling. 

Eule XIX. — Passing or Throwing the Ball. 

Section 3— (6) Pass illegal if more than 20 

yards. 
Section 4— Forward pass striking ground. 
Section 5— Players who may receive forward 

pass (a), (6), (c). 
Section 6— Forward pass out of bounds. 
Section 7— Forward pass crossing goal line on 

fly. 

Section 8— Forward pass crossing goal line 

after being legally touched. 
Section 9— Batting the ball. 

Eule XX. — Off-side and On-side. 

Section 4— When kicked ball touches the 

ground in field of play. 
Section 5— Kicker, though on-side, may not 

recover ball. 

Eule XXIV. — Conduct of Players. 

Section 1— Striking, kneeing, kicking, etc. 
Section 2— ' 'Roughing the full-back. ' ' 
Section 3— Piling up. 
Section 5 — Tripping, tackling out of bounds, 

etc. 
Section 6— Crawling. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 137 

RULE XXX. 

Section 7— Unsportsmanlike conduct. 
Section 8— Tackling. 

Rule XXV. — Conduct of Persons Other Than 
Players. 
Section 1 — Side line coaching. 
Section 3— Persons allowed on field of play. 
Section 4— Persons allowed on side lines. 

RULE XXXI. 

DUTIES OF THE LINESMAN. 

Section 1. The Linesman under the super- 
vision of the Referee shall mark the dis- 
tances gained or lost in the progress of the 
play. He shall remain on or near one of 
the side lines throughout the game, and be 
provided with two assistants, who shall 
remain outside of the field of play and who 
shall use in measuring distance two light 
poles or rods about 6 feet in length, con- 
nected at their lower end by a stout cord or 
chain 10 yards in length. 

He shall mark the position of the ball on 
each down by using a short iron rod. 

Section 2. He shall mark the point where 
the ball goes out of bounds on his side of 
the field. 

Section 3. The Linesman shall report to 
the Umpire any off-side play of the ends on a 
kick, and any tripping of ends after a kick. 

Section 4. The Linesman's jurisdiction 
under the following rules is exclusively 
as assistant to the Referee and Umpire, 
respectively, to which officials he shall 
report. 



138 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XXXI. 

BRIEF OF RULES. 

(WHERE LINESMAN HAS JURISDICTION IN ASSISTING 
THE REFEREE AND UMPIRE,) 

Rule VI. — Definitions. 

Section 6 (c)— Ball out of bounds on side 

opposite Field Judge. 
Section 17— The ball is dead: 

(d) When ball goes out of bounds after 
a kick. 

(e) When player carrying the ball goes 
out of bounds. 

Rule XIX. — Passing or Throwing the Ball. 
Section 6— Forward pass out of bounds. 

Rule XXIV. — Conduct of Players. 

Section 1— Striking, kneeing, kicking, etc. 
Section 2— ' ' Roughing the full-back, ' ' 
Section 3— Piling up. 
Section 5— Tripping, tackling out of bounds, 

etc. 
Section 7— Unsportsmanlike conduct. 
Section 8— Tackling. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 139 



Notes 

The notes in former editions were sometimes of equal rank and 
iorce with the rules, in which case they have been made rules in 
this edition, and in other cases they were interpretations of the 
rules, recommendations or mere suggestions as to the arrange- 
ment of the field or the conduct of the game, in which cases they 
are given here. 

Note 1. Rule 1.— Marking Out of Field. 

The intersecting 5-yard lines, used formerly for con- 
venience in measuring lateral distances, are now omitted. 

The Referee, previous to the beginning of play, should 
satisfy himself that the various lines are properly marked. 

Note 2. Measuring Progress of Bali. 

To assist in measuring the progress of the ball it is de- 
sirable to provide two light poles about six feet in length, 
connected at their lower ends by a stout cord or chain 10 
yards in length. 

Note 3. Timing and Signals of Officials. 

It is desirable to have a stop-watch for the Field Judge, 
a whistle for the Referee and a horn or bell of some kind for 
the Umpire and Field Judge, in order to distinguish their 
calls from that of the Referee. 

Note 4. Rule VI., Section 3— Two Lines of Scrimmage. 

It is evident from the definition that there must be two 
lines of scrimmage, one for each side, thus separating the 
two forward lines by a space equal to the length of the ball. 

Note 5. Rule XV. -Who May Put the Ball in Play. 

Any player of the side that is entitled to a free-kick may 
put the ball in play. 

Note 6. Rule VIII., Section 1— Object of Restrictions on 
Position of Players on Scrimmage Line. 

Rule VIII., Section i, is intended to prevent any player 
required to be on the line of scrimmage from taking a posi- 
tion at such an angle to the line of scrimmage, whether he 
faces in toward the center or away from it, as shall enable 
him the more rapidly to get into the interference. 



140 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

Note 7. Rule VIII., Section 3-Shifting of Middle Men. 

The playing of a so-called center, guard or tackle on de- 
fense as an end or back on offense, or any other shifting of 
men in attempted evasion of Rule VIII., Section 3, is con- 
strued to be within the prohibition. Otherwise, so far as the 
defense is concerned, the captain is not restrained in placing 
his men. If a captain desires to shift the center, guard or 
tackle into the back-field, he may do so on speaking to the 
Referee. But the player so shifted shall not again return to 
one of these middle line positions. Any one of those men 
may, however, be taken five yards back without consulting the 
Referee and may return again to his position. 

Note 8. Rule XX., Section 5-Roughing the Full-Back. 

As by virtue of the prohibition of Rule XX., Section 5, the 
kicker can neither put players on-side nor himself get the 
ball, there is no excuse for running into or otherwise roughly 
treating him, and consequently officials should punish such 
offenses by disqualification, as provided in Rule XXIV, y 
Section 2. 

Note 9. Rule VI., Section 14; Rule XXIV., Section 5— Diving 
Under a Play. 

Mere diving under a play is construed as not being within 
the definition or prohibition of tripping. 

Note 10. Rule VI., Section 15; Rule XXIV., Section 4-Step- 
ping Over a Player. 

Mere stepping over a prostrate player, though the player 
so doing may have momentarily both feet in the air at the 
same time, is construed as not being within the definition or 
prohibition of hurdling. 

Note 11. Rule XIII., Section 5. 

The penalty under Rule XIII., Section 5, is to be enforced,. 
though it results in placing the offending side behind its own 
goal line. A second offense behind the goal line is to be 
penalized exactly as if it had occurred inside the field of play. 

Note 12. No Play After Ball Dead. 

It is obvious that when the ball is dead no play can be 
made until the ball has again been put into play according 
to rule. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 141 

Note 13. Rule XXV., Section 1— Side Line Coaching. 

The Rules Committee especially requests the captains and 
coaches to use every means to discourage and prevent side 
line coaching. 

Note 14. Rule XXIV., Sections 1 and 2— Suspension from 
Playing Privilege by Institution on Two Disqualifications. 

The Rules Committee recommends that any player who is 
twice disqualified in the same season for any violation of 
Rule XXIV., Sections I and 2, or for a deliberate attempt to 
injure an opponent shall not be permitted to play again within 
one year from the date of the second disqualification. 

Note 15. Rule XV., Sections 7 and 8. 

Kicking the ball again in case it goes out of bounds at 
kick-off or on a kick-out is not a penalty, and therefore may 
not be declined. 

Note 16. Rule XXIX., Section 5. 

Captains and players may not, however, appeal to Referee, 
Field Judge or Linesman for their testimony on points in- 
volving disqualification. 

Note 17. Rule XII. 

In case of a place-kick the kicker may touch or adjust the 
ball in the hands of g the holder so long as the ball does not 
touch the ground. 

Note 18. Rule XX., Section 4. 

It should be noted that the rule reads: "Players of the side 
which put the ball in play." Hence when a kicked ball is 
returned by a kick the players of the side which returned it 
are not put on-side by the ball striking the ground. 

Note 19. Rule XVII., Section 4. 

Opponents must bear in mind that a player running toward 
a fly ball has the right of way, and if off-side they must get 
out of his way. Otherwise they will interfere with him in 
his opportunity for making a fair catch. 

Note 20. Rule XIX., Section 7. 

Of course the provisions of this section do not apply in a 

case where a forward pass is made over the goal line by a 

team from behind its own goal line. 
E 



142 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

Note 21. Rule VI., Sections 6 and 17 (a). 

The Referee should never blow his whistle to indicate a 
foul, but if he inadvertently does so the ball is dead and the 
play shall stop. 

Note 22. Rule XV., Section 2, and Rule XXVI., Section 4. 
This means, of course, that it is first down with io yards to 
gain. 

Note 23. Rule XVIII., Section 1, and Rule XIX. V Section 5 (a). 

It follows that a player who is more than one foot back of 
the scrimmage line and not one yard back of the scrimmage 
line is not eligible in any event to receive a forward pass. 
He cannot receive it as being the player on the end of the 
scrimmage line, for he is not on the scrimmage line under 
Rule VIII., Section I. He cannot receive it as a player back 
of the scrimmage line, because he is not at least one yard 
back, under provisions of Rule XIX., Section 5 (a). 

Note 24. Rule III., Section 1. 

For the purpose of designating the positions the accom- 
panying diagram is inserted. 

Customary Naming of Positions. 
OOOOOOO 

End Tackle Guard Center Guard Tackle End 

o 

Quarter 

o o 

Half-back Half-back 

O 

Full-back 

Note 25. Rule IV., Section 2 (b). 

This is formal, and if the offending side still fails to appear 
the Referee should proceed under Rule XVI., Section 4, third 
paragraph penalty. 

Note 26. Rule XXVIII. 

The Referee should usually take his position behind the 
line of the side that has possession of the ball. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



143 




No. 1. 
LEGAL POSITION OF BALL BE- 
FORE BEING PUT IN PLAY IN A 
SCRIMMAGE -The ball is fiat upon 
the ground with its long axis at right 
angles to the line of scrimmage. (See 
Rule VI., Sec. 3, Page 83 ) 




No. 2. 
ILLEGAL POSITION OF BALL BE- 
FORE BEING PUT IN PLAY IN 
A SCRIMMAGE— The ball is neither 
fiat upon the ground, nor is its long 
axis at right angles to the line of 
scrimmage, (See Rule VI., Sec, 3, 
Page 83 ) 




No. 3. 
ILLEGAL, POSITION OF BALL BE- 
FORE BEING PUT IN PLAY IN 
A SCRIMMAGE-The ball is neither 
flat upon the ground, nor is its long 
axis at right angles to the line of 
scrimmage. (See Rule VI., Sec. 3, 
Page 83 ) 




No. 4. 
ILLUSTRATION SHOWING THE 
TWO LINES OF SCRIMMAGE. 
ONE FOR EACH SIDE— Also show- 
ing the snapper-back with his head 
and hand* legally off-side. (See Rule 
VI., Sec. 3, Page 83 and Rule VHL. 
Sec. 2, Page 92 ) 



No 

I^EGAL POSITION OF PLAYER 
SUPPOSED TO BE ON THE LINE 
OF SCRIMMAGE-Player No. 1, 
since he is one of the two players 
standing on either side of and next to 
the snapper-back, has legally locked 
legs with the snapper-back. (See 
Rule Vin., Sec. 1, Page 91 ) 




ILLEGAL POSITION OF PLAYERS 
SUPPOSED TO BE ON THE LINE 
OF SCRIMMAGE — Players num- 
bered 2 and 3 are not standing with 
both feet outside the outside foot of 
the player next to them, that is, they 
are illegally "locking legs." (See 
Rule Vin., Sec. 1, Page 91 ) 



144 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDS. 




No. 6. 

ILLEGAL POSITION OF PLAYER 
SUPPOSED TO BE ON THE LINE 
OF SCRIMMAGE-The player fac- 
ing the reader has neither both hands 
nor both feet up to or within one foot 
of the line of scrimmage, nor has he 
one foot and the opposite hand up to 
or within one foot of it. Further- 
more, he has taken a position, facing 
away from the center, that will 
enable him the more rapidly to get 
into the interference. (See Rule 
VIII., Sec. 1, Page 91.) 




No, 7. 

ILLEGAL POSITION OF PLAYER 
SUPPOSED TO BE ON THE LINE 
OF SCRIMMAGE-The player stand- 
ing back to the reader has neither 
both hands nor both feet up to or 
within one foot of the line of scrim- 
mage, nor has he one foot and the 
opposite hand up to or within one 
foot of it. Furthermore, he has 
taken a position facing in toward the 
center, that will enable him the more 
rapidly to get into the interference* 
(See Rule VIII., Sec. 1, Page 91.) 






No. 8. 

ILLEGAL POSITION OF PLAYER 
SUPPOSED TO BE ON THE LINE 
OF SCRIMMAGE-The player in the 
foreground may be said to have both 
hands or one foot and the opposite 
hand, up to or within one foot of the 
line of scrimmage, but he has taken 
a position that will enable him the 
more rapidly to get into the inter- 
ference, and is therefore violating 
the spirit of the rule. (See Rule 
VIII., Sec. 1. Page 91.) 



No. 9. 



No. 10. 



VALID SIGNAL FOR A FAIR 
CATCH-The player, while advan- 
cing toward the ball, has raited his 
hand clearly above his head. (See 
Rule VI., Sec. 5, Page 84.) 

INVALID SIGNAL FOR A FAIR 
CATCH— The player, while advan- 
cing toward the ball, ha?, not raised 
his hand clearly above his head. (See 
Rule VI., Sec. 5, Page 84.) 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDF. 



145 




No. 11. 

ILLUSTRATION OF TRIPPING - 
The player wearing the sweater is ob- 
structing: the other player with that 
part of his leg that is below the knee. 
(See Rule VI., Sec. 14, Page 88.) 




No. 12. 
LEGAL USE OF BODY IN BLOCK- 
ING— The player on the right has 
thrown his shoulder against his op- 
ponent's thigh to block him away 
from the play, but is not using his 
hands or arms. (See Rule XVIII., 
Sec. 5, Page 108.) 




No. 13. 

ILLEGAL USE OF HANDS BY 
PLAYER OF SIDE IN POSSES- 
SION OF THE BALL— Player is 
grasping with his hands the foot 
of an opponent. (See Rule XVIII., 
Sec. 5, Page 108) 




No. 14. 



ILLEGAL USE OF HAND AND 
ARM BY PLAYER OF SIDE IN 
POSSESSION OF THE BALL-The 
middle player of the group, in en- 
deavoring to protect the "runner" 
behind him, has grasped an opponent 
by the jersey. (See Rule XVIH , 
Sec. 5, Page 108) 



146 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 




No. 15. 

LEGAL POSITION IN BLOCKING- 
The player facing the reader has 
slipped his leg in between the legs of 
his opponent, but is not using his 
hands or arms to hold him there. 
Note — This case shades very rapidly 
into that indicated on plate No. 16. 
(See Rule XVHL. Sec. 5, Page 108.) 




No. 16. 

ILLEGAL USE OF HANDS AND 
ARMS IN BLOCKING-The player 
facing the reader has slipped his 
right leg in between the legs of hii 
opponent, and is holding his oppo- 
nent's right leg against his own by 
the use of his hand and arm. 
Note— The use of the leg, here 
pictured, i3 legitimate. (See Rule 
XVHI., Sec. 5, Page 108.) 




No. 17. 



ILLEGAL USE OF ARM BY PLAY- 
ER OF SIDE IN POSSESSION OF 
BALL— Player No. 1, in endeavoring 
to obstruct an opponent, is using his 
arm to push an opponent away from 
the play. (See Rule XVIII.. Sec. 5, 
Page 108.) 




No. 18. 

ILLEGAL USE OF HANDS AND 
ARMS BY PLAYER OF SIDE IN 
POSSESSION OF BALL — Player 
No. 1, in attempting to obstruct an 
opponent, has placed his hands upon 
an opponent to push him away from 
the play. (See Rule XVHI., Sec. 5, 
Page 108.) 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



147 




No. 19. 

ILLEGAL USE OF HANDS AND 
ARMS BY PLAYER OF SIDE IN 
POSSESSION OF THE BALL— The 
player, in attempting to obstruct his 
opponent, has circled him with his 
arm. (See Rule XVIII., Sec. 5, 
Page 108.) 




No. 20. 

ILLEGAL USE OF HAND AND 
ARM BY PLAYER OF SIDE IN 
POSSESSION OF THE BALL— The 
player, in obstructing his opponent* 
has circled him with his arm and 
grasped him with his hand. (See 
Rule XVIII., Sec. 5, Page 108.) 




No. 21. 

ILLEGAL USE OF HANDS AND 
ARMS BY PLAYER OF THE SIDE 
IN POSSESSION OFTHEBALL- 
The player has grasped his opponent 
around the knee and is lifting him up. 
(See Rule XVIH.. Sec. 5, Page 108.) 




No. 22. 



•ILLEGAL USE OF ARMS IN LIFT- 
ING AN OPPONENT IN BLOCK- 
ING— The player on the right has 
managed to get under his opponent's 
right shoulder with both hands and 
is lifting him away from the play. 
(See Rule XVIII., Sec. 5. Page 108.) 



148 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 




No. 23. 

ILLEGAL USE OF HANDS AND 
ARMS LN LIFTING AN OPPO- 
NENT IN BLOCKING-The player 
on the right has slipped both arms, 
from his elbow out, in under his op- 
ponent, and is commencing to lift 
him up and away from the play. 
(See Rule XVIII., Sec. 5, Page 108.) 




No. 24. 

LEGAL USE OF ARMS BY PLAYER 
OF SIDE IN POSSESSION OF 
THE BALL-Player No. 2, in at- 
tempting to obstruct an opponent, is 
keeping his arms close to his body. 
(See Rule XVIIL, Sec. 5. Page 108.) 





No. 25. 



LEGAL USE OF ARMS BY PLAYER 
OF SIDE IN POSSESSION OF 
THE BALL-Player No. 2, in at- 
tempting to obstruct an opponent, is 
keeping his arms close to his body. 
(See Rule XVHI., Sec. 5, Page 108.) 



No. 26. 

LEGAL USE OF HANDS AND 
ARMS BY PLAYER OF SIDE IN 
POSSESSION OF THE BALL— 
The player in the middle ef the 
group, in attempting to obstruct an 
opponent, is keeping his hands to- 
gether and his arms close to his body. 
Note — The Committee wishes to 
make it plain that if, in interfering, 
a player keeps his hands together 
and close to his body, he may legiti- 
mately use the projecting portions 
of his arms. (See Rule XVIIL, Sec 
5, Page 108.) 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



149 




No. 27. 



ILLEGAL USE OP HANDS AND 
ARMS BY PLAYER OF SIDE 
IN POSSESSION OF BALL-The 
player in the middle of the group is 
attempting to obstruct an opponent 
by the use of his hands and arms— 
which are not close to his body. 
Note — The Committee wishes to 
make it plain that if, in interfering, 
a player does not keep his hands to- 
gether, and his arms close to his 
body — he may not legitimately use 
the projecting portions of his arms. 
(See Rule XVIIL, Sec. 5, Page 108.) 




No. 28. 

ILLEGAL STRIKING, WITH THE 
LOCKED HANDS, BY A LINE 
MAN IN BREAKING THROUGH 
—The player on the right, having 
locked his hands, is on the point of 
dealing his opponent an upward 
blow under the chin. (See Rule 
XXIV., Sec. 1, Page 115.) 




No. 29. 

ILLEGAL STRIKING OF AN OP- 
PONENT IN THE FACE WITH 
THE HEEL OF THE HAND BY 
A PLAYER ON DEFENSE-The 
player on the right, who is on the de- 
fense, is on the point of striking in 
the face, with the heel of his hand, 
the opponent who is carrying the ball. 
(See Rule XXIV., Sec. 1, Page 115.) 




No. 30. 

LEGAL TACKLING ABOVE THE 
KNEES- (See Rule XXIV.. Sec. 8, 
Page 117.) 



150 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



Index to Rules 



RULE PAGE 

Advance of ball 21 114 

Appeal — Captains and players may not, to Referee or Lines- 
man for testimony concerning violations under disqualifi- 
cation Note 16 141 

Referee may, to other officials for testimony 28 123 

Umpire may, to other officials for testimony in cases of 

fouls 29 129 

Ball — Description of 2 79 

Batting 19 112 

Carried forward by player first receiving it from snapper- 
back 15 99 

Holder of, in place-kick after fair catch, or touchdown, may 

be off-side or out of bounds • 14 98 

Is dead 6 89 

Kicked, must go 1 yards 22 115 

Kicked, must cross line of scrimmage or touch opponent 

to afford opponent an equal chance at 21 114 

Kicked out of bounds belongs to opponents 15 100 

Kicked, striking ground in field of play, may not be kicked 

further 20 113 

Kicked, touching ground, puts players on-side 20 

Kicked, touching player when off-side 20 113 

Kicked, touched while in air by player of kicking side 

inside 10-yard line, touchback 20 113 

Measuring position of, when dead 21 114 

Methods of Kicking 6 82 

Drop-kick 6 S3 

Free-kick 6 83 

Kick-off 6 83 

Kick-out 6 S3 

Place-kick 6 82 

Punt 6 83 

Punt-out 6 83 

Must be advanced 10 yards in three downs 21 114 

No rotation of, before measurement 21 114 

No interference before ball is in play 17 103 

Position of, when dead 6 90 

Put in play from out of bounds 15 100 

Put in play from scrimmage 6 • 90 

Referee judge of putting, in play and progress of 28 125 

Throwing, passing 19 109 

When dead 6 89 

When dead, may not be put in play except by rule 15 98 

When declared dead, scrimmage ends 6 83 

When out of bounds 6 88 

Batting — Ball toward opponents' goal 19 112 

Brief of Rules — Where Referee has jurisdiction 28 124 

Where Umpire has jurisdiction 29 128 

Where Field Judge has jurisdiction 30 132 

Where Linesman has jurisdiction 31 138 

Clothing — Restrictions on .". 3 80 

Coaching — Penalty for, 15 yards 25 US 

Prohibited 25 118 

Conduct of players ■. . 24 115 

Of persons other than players 25 118 

Unsportsmanlike 24 117 

Crawling 6 88 

Darkness 4 82 

Dead — When bail is 6 89 

Decision — Precedence of, in case of conflict 26 121 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 151 

EULE PAGE 

Definitions— Crawling 6 88 

Down 6 85 

Fair catch 6 84 

Fair catch, mark of 6 84 

Fair catch, not made 6 84 

Field of play : 1 79 

Foul 6 88 

Goal from field 6 87 

Goal from touchdown 6 87 

Hurdling 6 88 

Out of bounds 6 88 

Safety 6 86 

Scrimmage 6 83 

Scrimmage, line of 6 83 

Scrimmage, player on line of 8 91 

Touchback 6 86 

Touchdown 6 85 

Tripping 6 88 

Delay — Deliberate fouls to game 24 117 

Interference with opponents before ball put in play re- 
garded as 17 103 

Not longer than two minutes 16 102 

Playing for penalties to delay game 24 117 

Disqualification (and loss of half distance to goal line) 24 115 

Penalty for roughing kicker 24 116 

Player twice disqualified recommended debarred for one 

year Note 14 141 

Distance — Half remaining, to goal line given for foul inside 

1-yard line 26 121 

Necessary on kick 22 115 

To be gained and number of down unchanged after penalty 

for coaching from side lines, etc 25 118 

To be gained, and number of down unchanged after time 

has been taken out more than 3 times 16 102 

Down— Definition of 6 85 

And point to be gained for first, remains same after penalty 

inflicted on side in possession of ball 26 120 

First, following distance penalty, if side not in possession is 

penalized 26 120 

If neither side in possession of ball when foul committed it 
shall go to offended side as first, at spot where foul 

occurred 26 120 

If foul committed after gain of such length, that after 
exaction of penalty, ball still in advance of point neces- 
sary for first down, ensuing down shall be first 26 120 

Number of, after time called more than 3 times 16 102 

Number of, and distance to be gained unchanged in penalty 

for coaching from side lines, etc 25 118 

Number of, and point to be gained for first, after palpably 

unfair act 24 118 

Downs — Consecutive 21 114 

Necessary gain in three 21 114 

Drop-kick 6 83 

Passing over cross-bar shall score 6 87 

Duties of officials 28-31 122,138 

Enforcement of penalties 26 119 

Equipment of players 3 80 

Fair Catch— Definition of 6 84 

Ball put in play after 15 98 

Holder of ball, in place-kick after, or touchdown, may be 

off-side or out of bounds 14 98 

If not made from punt-out on first attempt, ball goes to 

center of field as kick-off 15 101 

Interference with opportunity for making 17 103 

Kick from, must go 10 yards 22 115 



152 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

Fair Catch— Definition of— Continued. EULB PAGH 

Mark of 6 84 

No interference with, by opponents 17 103 

Not made 6 84 

Opportunity to make, defined 6 84 

Player may not be thrown to ground after making 17 103 

Position of opponents after 13 97 

Position of opponents on punt, drop-kick or place-kick from. 13 97 

Signal for 17 104 

Field — Diagram of 1 78 

Dimensions of 1 79 

Marking of 1 79 

Field of play 1 79 

Field Judge— Duties of 30 134 

Brief of rules where, has jurisdiction 30 134 

Flying tackle 24 117 

Forward Pass — Crossing goal line on fly 19 HI 

By side not putting ball in play 19 109 

Crossing goal line after being legally touched 19 112 

Going out of bounds 19 111 

No, by defensive side 19 109 

One, to each scrimmage 19 11<> 

Over line of scrimmage 19 1C9 

Forfeiture of game 4, 16, 24 82,103,117 

In case of deliberate foul to delay game 24 117 

Referee judge of 24 117 

Foul— Definition of 6 88 

Ball may not be again put in play after, until penalty 

exacted or declined 15 99 

Carrying ball across goal line or nearer to it than 1-yard 

line 26 121 

Committed after gain of such length that ensuing down 

counted first down even after exaction of distance penalty. 26 120 

Committed inside 1-yard line 26 120 

Committed w T hen ball not in possession of either side, 

penalty for 26 120 

Decision of Referee regarding, final where not specifically 

within jurisdiction of other official 28 122 

Deliberate, to delay game 24 117 

If Umpire signals, play continues until ball dead 29 129 

More than one signaled against same side during same play. 26 121 

Offended side may decline to accept penalty for 26 122 

One official signals, against one side; another official signals 

against other side on same play 26 121 

Palpably unfair act 24 118 

Penalty for, inflicted by Umpire, takes precedence over 

Referee 28 123 

Referee shall ascertain that each team is ready before 

ordering play after calling 28 123 

When signal for, has been given. Umpire shall enforce 

penalty : 29 129 

Free-kick 6 83 

Position of players on 13 97 

Gain necessary, on downs 21 114 

Game— Length of 4 80 

Beginning of game and of other three periods 7 90 

Shortening of, by agreement of captains 4 80 

Shortening on account of darkness 4 82 

Goal — Change of, after try-at-goal and goal from field and 

beginning of periods 7 90 

Choice of, at kick-off 7 90 

Distance penalties near 26 120 

From touchdown 6 87 

From field 6 87 

Ooal lines 1 79 

Goal defined 1 79 

Where placed and dimensions of 1 79 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 153 

RULE PAGE 

Hands and Arms — Used by runner 18 105 

Use of, by attacking side 18 108 

Use of, by defending side 18 108 

Use of, by players, running down field under kick 18 107 

Use of, when close to body 18 107 

Holding or unlawful obstruction — by side in possession 18 108 

Circling opponent 18 108 

Grasping opponent 18- 108 

Lifting opponent 18 108 

Pushing opponent away 18 105 

Hurdling — Definition of 6 88 

Prohibition of 24 116 

Penalty for 21 116 

Interference — With fair catch 17 103 

With opponents before ball in play, no 17 103 

With snapper-back, no 17 103 

Interlocked interference 17 101 

Interlocking Legs — Limitations oa 8 92 

Intermission 4 SI 

Kick — Fair, and equal chance at 21 114 

On. from behind line of scrimmage, kicker may not recover 

ball 20 113 

Over goal line on fly, a touchback 6 86 

Returned, may not be recovered before touching player of 

other side 20 113 

When ball touches ground after, players of kicking side 

on-side 20 113 

On-side 20 113 

On-side, may not be kicked further 20 113 

On-side, not allowed on return kick 20" 113 

Kicked Ball — Crossing goal line on fly. a touchback 6 86 

May not be kicked further after striking ground 20 113 

Must go 10 yards 22 115 

Out of bounds 6 88 

Player off-side put on-side when, touches ground 20 113 

Putting kicker's side on-side may not be kicked further.. 20 113 
Touched on fly inside 10-vard line by opponent, a touch- 
back 6, 20 86,113 

Kicker — Must be 5 yards back 20 114 

Standing back of line of scrimmage may not put men on 

side or recover tall 20 113 

Kicking— Methods of 6 82,83 

Of player prohibited 24 115 

Kick-off 6 S3 

After try-at-goal 7 91 

At beginning of periods 7 90 

Ball kicked across goal line at 7 91 

Ball kicked out of bounds at 15 99 

Ball put in play by, at beginning of each period and 

after goal 7 90 

Beginning of game 7 90 

Cannot score goal .- 6 87 

Choice of goals at 7 90 

Following failure to make fair catch on punt-out 15 101 

Must go 10 yards 22 115 

Player of kicker's side off-side at 9 93 

Position of opponents at and kick from i'air catch 9 93 

Position of players at 9 93 

Side scored upon has option of 7 91 

Kick-out 6 83 

Ball going out of bounds on 15 100 

Kick-out after safety 10 94 

Kick-out after touchback 10 94 

Must go 10 yards 22 115 

Positions of players at 10 94 



154 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE PAGE 

Knee — Meeting with » 24 115 

Kneeing 24 115 

Language — Abusive or insulting 24 117 

Legs — Interlocking of, limitations on 8 91 

Length of game 4 80 

.Length of periods , 4 81 

Linesman — Duties of 31 137 

Brief of rules where, has jurisdiction 31 138 

Marks distances gained or lost 31 137 

Remains on side lines, and provided with two assistants... 31 137 

Responsible for off-side play of ends on kick 31 137 

Responsible for tripping of ends after a kick 31 137 

Locked interference 17 108 

Movement — Allowed before ball put in play 8 93 

"Neutral zone" — Formed by two lines of scrimmage (see 

• 'Line of Scrimmage' ' ) 6 83 

Notes 139 

Number of players 3 80 

Obstruction, Lawful— After 20 yards 18 107 

By player running down field under kick, to push op- 
ponents out of way 18 107 

Unlawful — Use of hands and arms, by player off-side ]8 106,107 

Officials 27 122 

Field Judge — Duties of 30 132 

Brief of rules where, has jurisdiction 30 134 

Linesman — Duties of 31 137 

Brief of rules whore, has jurisdiction 31 138 

Referee — Duties of 28 122 

Brief of rules where, has jurisdiction 28 124 

Umpire — Duties of 29 1 28 

Brief of rules where, has jurisdiction 29 130 

Off-side— Defined 6 84 

Deliberate attempt of player other than snapper-back to 

draw opponents 15 99 

Holder of ball in place-kick after fair catch, or touchdown, 

may be, or out of bounds 14 98 

Holder of ball in place-kick from fair catch or try-at-goal 

may be 14 98 

Kicked ball touched on fly by a player w T hile inside opponents' 

10-yard line 20 113 

No player, behind his own goal line 20 112 

No part of any player shall be 8 92 

Player, how put 20 113 

Player, put on-side 20 113 

Player while, may recover kicked ball after it has touched 

the ground 20 113 

Restrictions when 20 113 

Use of hands aid arms l>y playors, when running down 

field under kick IS 107 

Off-side Play — Linesman responsible for, of ends on kicks.... 31 137 
On-side— Kicker, standing back of line of scrimmage may not 

put players 20 113 

Linesman shall see that ends are, when the ball put in play 

in scrimmage 31 137 

Player of kicking side, when kicked ball touches ground.... 20 113 

Player off-side, put 20 113 

On-side Kick 20 113 

May not be kicked at after striking ground 20 113 

Out of Bounds— At kick-off. ball kicked 15 99 

Ball kicked, at kick-out 15 100 

Defined 6 88 

Holder of ball in place-kick after fair catch or touchdown 

may be, or off-side 14 98 

Kick or forward pass going 15, 19 100,111 

No player may be 14 98 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 155 

Out of bounds— Continued. RULE PAGE 

Putting ball in play from 15 100 

Tackling runner 24 116 

Time not taken out when ball 16 102 

Palpably Unfair Act — In case play interfered with by 24 118 

Passing — Ball toward opponents' goal 19 109 

Penalties — Disqualification and loss of half distance to goal 

line 24 115 

First down after distance 26 120 

Forfeiture 4, 16, 24 82,103,117 

Foul committed after gain of such length that ensuing down 

counted as first down, even after exaction of distance 26 120 

No right to decline 26 321 

Suspension 24 117 

Penalty, Distance — Foul committed after gain of such length 

that after exaction of, ensuing down counted first down.. 26 120 
Inflicted on side not in possession of ball counted as first 

down 26 120 

That would carry ball near or over goal line 26 120 

When inflicted on side in possession of ball, number of down 

and point to be gained remains the same 26 120 

Piling up, no.. 24 116 

Place-kick 6 82 

Direct, player of side which has made touchdown shall 

hold ball for 12 95 

For try-at-goal following fair catch 23 115 

Holder of ball in try-at-goal by, may adjust ball Note 17 141 

In, after a fair catch, or touchdown, hoider of ball may be 

off-side or out of bounds 14 9S 

In, direct, or preceded by a punt-out following touchdown 

opponents must remain behind their goal line until ball 

placed on ground 12 96 

Passing over cross-bar shall score 6 87 

Players — Number of 3 80 

Position of, at scrimmage 8 91 

Kick-off 9 93 

Punt-out 11 95 

Place-kick at goal 12 95 

Free kick 13 97 

Out of bounds 14 98 

Precedence of decision in case of conflict 28 123 

Prohibitions — 

No acts of unnecessary roughness 24 116 

No coaching 25 118 

No crawling , 24 11 6 

No hurdling 24 116 

No kicking 24 115 

No kneeing 24 115 

No meeting with knee 24 115 

No piling up 24 113 

No pushing and pulling 17 104 

:No striking in the face with heel of hand by player on 

defense 24 115 

No striking with fist or elbows 24 115 

No striking with locked hands by linemen 24 115 

No tackling below knees 24 117 

No tripping 24 116 

No tackling runner when clearly out of bounds 24 116 

No unsportsmanlike conduct — use of abusive or insulting 

language 24 117 

One representative only in case of accident 25 118 

Only 3 men may walk along side lines 25 119 

Recommendation — No player twice disqualified in same 
season permitted to play again for one calendar 

year Note 14 141 



156 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE PAGE 

Punt 6 83 

Punter 11 95 

Punter's side 11 95 

Punt-out 6 83 

Fair catch following 12 96 

If fair catch not made at first attempt on, ball goes as 

kick-off 15 101 

Positions of players at 11 95 

Position of punter at, preceding try-at-goal 11 95 

Putting ball in play 15 98 

Referee — Appeal of, to other officials for testimony 28 123 

At beginning of game and when time out, shall ascertain 

from captains whether ready for play 28 123 

Brief of rules where, has jurisdiction 28 124 

Decision of, final on all points not specified under duties of 

Umpire 28 122 

Duties of 28 122 

Judge of forfeiture of game 28 122 

Judge of position and progress of ball - 28 123 

Judge of putting ball in play 28 123 

List of rules in which, has jurisdiction 28 124 

Must allow precedence to penalties inflicted by Umpire 28 123 

Sole authority for score of game 28 122 

Representative, one, on field, in case of accident 25 118 

Roughness, Unnecessary 24 116 

Rules — List of, where Referee has jurisdiction 28 124 

Where Field Judge has jurisdiction 30 134 

Where Linesman has jurisdiction 31 138 

Where Umpire has jurisdiction 29 130 

Safety— Definition of 6 86 

Kicker's side must be behind ball on kick-out after 10 94 

Kick-out after 10 94 

One player in motion 8 93 

Resulting from enforcement of penalty 6 87 

Starting Forward Beyond Restraining Line — If player allows 

ball to touch ground 13 98 

Lawful on punt-out as soon as ball is kicked 11 95 

When player advances beyond mark with ball 13 98 

Scrimmage 6 83 

Ball flat upon ground in 6 83 

Ball put in play by, after distance penalty 26 120 

Ball put in play from 15 98 

Counted as first down after distance penalty for foul by 

side not in possession of ball 26 120 

Ends when ball declared dead 6 83 

Line of 6 83 

No movement before ball put in play 8 93 

No part of any player shall be ahead of line of 8 92 

No player of the five middle players of the line may drop 

back from line of 8 92 

Number of down and point to be gained in, remain same 

when penalty inflicted on side in possession of ball 26 120 

One forward pass to each 19 110 

Player on line of 8 91 

Position of players at 8 91 

Putting ball in play by, after ball goes out of bounds 15 100 

Restrictions when ball is put in play by kick forward 17 103 

Seven players of offensive side must be on line of, when 

ball put in play 8 93 

Scoring — Referee sole authority for 28 122 

Value of plays in 5 82 

Side lines — Defined 1 79 

Three men may walk along 25 119 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 157 

RULE PAGE 

Snapping the ball defined 6 83 

Entitled to full and undisturbed possession of ball 17 103 

Feint by player other than, to draw opponent off-side, ball 

not in play 15 99 

Feint to snap the ball by 15 99 

Must be on-side, except hand or foot 8 92 

No interference with 17 103 

Two men standing on either side of, may interlock legs 

with 8 91 

On-side 8 92 

Stop watch Note 3 139 

Striking — With fists or elbows 24 115 

In face with heel of hand 24 115 

With locked hands 24 115 

Substitutes 3 80 

Must report to Referee before engaging in play 3 80 

Player replaced by, may return once in a subsequent period 3 80 

Suspension 24 117 

Tackling runner when out of bounds 24 116 

Below knees 24 117 

Tackling— Flying tackle 24 117 

10-Yard Rule 21 114 

Time— Called at end of period 4 . 82 

Captain may ask for, three times during each two periods.. 16 102 

Field Judge may give approximate, whenever asked 30 133 

Field Judge shall notify captains of remaining time for play 30 133 

Not called for end of period until ball is dead 4 82 

Not taken out when ball out of bounds 16 102 

Penalty for more than three requests for, by captains 16 102 

Referee has discretionary power for calling 16 102 

Remaining for play 30 133 

When begins again 16 101 

When called, shall continue not more than two minutes 16 102 

When taken out 16 101 

Throwing — Bali toward opponents' goal 19 109 

Touchback— Definition of 6 S6 

From kick-off 7 91 

Not a touchback 6 86 

When kicked ball crosses goal line on fly 6 86 

W T hen legal forward pass crosses goal line on the fly before 

being touched 19 111 

When legal forward pass, having been legally touched, 

crosses goal line 19 . 112 

Touchdown — Definition of , 6 84 

Holder of ball in place kick after, or fair catch, may be 

off-side or out of bounds 14 98 

In case of try-at-goal after, ball not kicked after touching 

ground 15 101 

In try-at-goal after, kicker may adjust ball Note 17 141 

Kick-off following try-at-goal after 23 115 

Marking of 6 85 

No change of goal following try-at-goal after 7 91 

Player of side which has made, shall hold ball for goal 

kick 12 95 

Position of opponents in try-at-goal after 11 95 

Side which has made, may try at goal 11 95 

Tripping — Definition of 6 88 

Diving under play, lawful without Note 9 140 

In case of, distance penalty given in addition 24 116 

Linesman responsible for, of ends after a kick 31 137 

Prohibition of 24 116 

Try-at-goal — After touchdown 23 115 

Ball held for, by place-kick direct 12 95 

Holder of ball may be off-side or out-of-bounds in, from 

touchdown 14 98 



158 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

Try-at-goal— Continued. RULE PAGE 

In case of, ball not kicked after touching ground, shall 

be kicked off 15 101 

Kicker may adjust ball for Note 17 141 

Kick-off following 15 101 

No change of goal following, after touchdown. 7 91 

Position of opponents in ' 11 95 

Position of punter on punt-out preceding 11 95 

Punt-out preceding 11 95 

Position of players at punt-out preceding 11 95 

Twenty yard zone 18 105 

Umpire — Appeal by, to other officials for testimony in case 

of fouls 29 1?9 

Brief of rules where, has jurisdiction 29 130 

Decision of, final on fouls not within jurisdiction of 

Referee or Field Judge 29 128 

Duties of 29 128 

Enforcement of penalty by, for violations reported 29 129 

Judge of conduct of players 29 128 

List of rules where, has jurisdiction 29 130 

Report to, by other officials of violations 29 129 

Use of hands and arms — By attacking side 18 106,108 

By defending side 18 106 

When off -side, unlawful ..,.,..., 18 104 







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166 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



Officials 9 List American Intercollegiate 
Foot Ball Rules Committee, 1911 

(Subject to Additions and Corrections.) 

It is difficult for the Centra 1 , Board to attempt to publish a complete list of 
satisfactory field officials, but in order to put the results of their work in 
more concrete form and preserve these data for convenience of managers, 
have prepared the enclosed partial list of men who have proved most service- 
able to the sectional committees in the East, West and South. It is hoped 
this will be of permanent value and simplify future arrangements. 
We take great pleasure in extending this to those whom it may aid. 

(Signed) CENTRAL BOARD ON OFFICIALS. 
L. M. DENNIS, PARKE H. DAVIS, 

WALTER CAMP, JAMES A. BABBITT, Chairman, 

CRAWFORD BLAGDEN, 

C. LINN SEILER, Secretary, 
121 So. 18th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

SUGGESTIONS FROM THE CENTRAL BOARD. 

The Central Board on Officials in concluding its work for the year would 
suggest the following plan for its work in the future: 

That the Central Board should be appointed by the Rules Committee whose 
function, (a) should be advisory, rendering assistance as indicated; (b) to 
assist by public interpretations of the foot ball rules; (c) to maintain a cer- 
tain control over sectional boards in the management of executive details; 
(d) to publish lists of accredited officials; (e) to offer recommendations for 
the conduct of these officials; (f) to arrange meetings for interpretation; (g) 
when advisable arrange conferences tending to the formation of sectional 
boards. 

LIST OF FOOT BALL OFFICIALS PUBLISHED BY THE 
CENTRAL BOARD ON OFFICIALS. 



Abbott, E. M., 
Adams, D. H., 
Aiken, John, 
Allen, Eugene E., 
Andrews, L. Hudson, 
Bankart, George N.. 
Barbe, Frank, 
Baynton, C. A., 
Beacham, J. W., Jr., 



CENTRAL BOARD LIST. 

(U. of P.) 818 Land Title Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Haverford) Cloyne House, Newport, R. I. 

(W. & J.) Washington, Pa. 

(Sprg. Tr. School) 11 Linden Place, Brookline, Mass. 

(Yale) Library Bureau, Cambridge, Mass. 

(Dartmouth) 95 South Street, Boston, Mass. 

(Waynesburg) Waynesburg, Pa. 

(Bowdoin) North Whitefield, Me. 

(West Point) West Point, N. Y. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



167 



Bennett, M. S., 
Bennis, Ed. N., 
Bergen, Iff. V., Jr., 
Bird, Howard, 
Booth, Walter C, 
Bower, John J., 
Bragg, E. L., 
Brayton, Rowland W., 
Brennick, H. E., 
Brown, George V., 
Brown, R. M., 
Brumbaugh, A. K., 
Brumbaugh, R. Edw., 
Bryan, Julian S., 
Buckley, J. T., 
Bull, Alfred, 
Burke, Wm. H., 
Burleigh, Fred W., 
Bush, George T., 
Butler, Haywood M., 
Cahill, J. W., 
Caine, Martin L., 
Cannell, W. S., 
Carothers, Samuel, 
Carpenter, Percy R., 
Cates, John M., 
Clough, Wm. P., 
Cober, E. W., 
Colter, Joseph, 
Cook, M. F., 
Cooke. T. F., 
Coonef, James, 
Cooper, Arthur D., 
Cooper, Charles D., 
Corbin, W. H., 
Costello, J. H., 
Cousins, Howard E., 
Craver, F. E., 
Croelius, Fred J., 
Crowell, W. G., 
Crowley, W. R., 
Curtin, Thomas F., 
Curtis, R. C, 
Dadmun, Harry L., 
Davidson, H. A., 
Davis, N. Evan., 
Dearborn, A. K., 
DeCamp, John A., 
Deland, L, F„ 



(U. of Pa.) 601 Pennsylvania Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(U. of Pa.) 2624 W. Fletcher Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Princeton) 1503 Land Title Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Yale) Testing Dept., G. E. Co., Schenectady, N. Y. 

(Princeton )32 Liberty Street, New York City. 

(F. and M.) Bellefonte, Pa. 

(Wesleyan) 43 Federal Street, Boston, Mass. 

(Harvard) 693 Washington Street, Dorchester, Mass. 

(Harvard) 1305 Maryland Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Boston Athletic Association, Boston, Mass. 

(Princeton) Princeton, N. J. 

(Lehigh) 816 Ross Avenue, Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

(Gettysburg) Roaring Spring, Pa. 

(Franklin, Haverford) Hamilton, N. Y. 

(Georgetown) 69 Arcade Building, Utica, N. Y. 

(U. of P.) Wilkesbarre, Pa. 

(W. P. I.) 16 Jefferson Street, Worcester, Mass. 

(Exeter) Peabody Square, Ashmont, Mass. 

(Swarthmore) Bellefonte. Pa. 

(Brown) Allegheny Prep. School, Pittsburg, Pa. 

(Harvard M.) 390 Main Street, Worcester, Mass. 

(Villanova, Yale), Waterbury, Conn. 

(Tufts) Rindge Technical School, Cambridge, Mass. 

(Princeton) 421 Wood Street, Pittsburg, Pa. 

(Harvard) Amherst, Mass. 

(Yale) U. S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md. 

(Dartmouth) Soldiers' Hospital, Chelsea, Mass. 

(Bucknell) 1230 Franklin Avenue, Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

(Brown) Cheshire School, Cheshire, Conn. 

(Virginia) 4 Union Street, Schenectady, N. Y. 

(M. A. C.) Pittsfield H.S., Pittsfield, Mass. 

(Princeton) Meyers, N. Y. 

(Harvard) "Boston Post," Boston, Mass. 

(Bucknell, Lafayette) Millersville, Pa. 

(Yale) care of W. N. Wiley & Son Co., Hartford, Conn. 

(Cornell) care Bethlehem Steel Co., S. Bethlehem, Pa. 

(Tufts) 93 Federal Street, Boston, Mass. 

(Dickinson) Carlisle, Pa. 

(Dartmouth) 1414 South Penn Square, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Swarthmore) 3818 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Bowdoin) 4th Avenue and 30th Street, New York City. 

(Fordham) Pittsfield, Mass. 

(Cornell) Cochrantown, Pa. 

(W. P. I.) Box 536, Worcester, Mass. 

(U. of P.) 233 South 4th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Wesleyan) Middletown, Conn. 

(Wesleyan) 343 Old South Building, Boston, Mass. 

(Williams) Little Falls, N. Y. 

35 Newbury Street, Boston, Mass. 



168 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



Denniston, T. H., 
DeWitt, J. K., 
Denman, G. E., 
Dickson, Reid S., 
Dietrich, R. D., 
Dodge, Gerard, 
Donnelly, Edw. J., 
Donnelly, James C, 
Doiman, A. R., 
I>owd, H. L., 
Dowling, Eugene, 
Draper. I>. W., 
Draper, Philip, 
Dunbar, Joseph R., 
Easton, Edward, 
Ely, Morris, 
Evans, J. A., 
Farmer, Allen B., 
Farrer, W. F., 
Farrier, A. M., 
Fauver, Edgar, 
Fauver, Edwin, 
Fisher, Harry A., 
Flanders, Carl S., 
Fleming, M. Ward, 
Flinn, A. Rex, 
Foley, Arthur J., 
Folwell, Robert C, 
Forkum, Carl S., 
Fry, Harry C, Jr., 
Fulta, David L., 
Gibson, Edw. T., 
Gillinder, Fred R., 
Godcharles, F. A., 
Goggin, W. J., 
Graves, Ernest, 
Guiney, J. J., 
Haines, W. H., 
Haley, A. B., 
Hall, E. K., 
Hallahan, John J., 
Halliday, F. Wade, 
Hamilton, A. J. A., 
Hamilton, Benj. P., 
Hammond, Harry S., 
Hapgood, Ernest G., 
Harrison, E. A., 
Hatch, J. A., 
Herkimer, Ralph J., 



(U. of P.) 1025 Land Title Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Princeton) Riegel Sack Co., Jersey City, N. J. 

(Williams) Hackettstown, N. J. 

(U. of P.) Princeton Seminary, Princeton, N. J. 

(Lafayette) 307 Allentown Bank Bldg., Allentown, Ta. 

(Harvard) Walsh Building, Cumberland, Md. 

(Trinity) 220 Broadway, New York City. 

(Dartmouth) 340 Main Street, Worcester, Mass. 

(Columbia) 114 Mill Street, New Bedford. Mass. 

(Princeton) 231 West 69th Street, New York City. 

(Carnegie) 205 Lothrop Street, Pittsburg, Pa. 

(U. of P.) Trinity School, 91st Street, New York City. 

(Williams) 210 Ilium Building, Troy, N. Y. 

(Phila. Dental) 216 Bridge Street, Phoenixville, Pa. 

(Yale) 503 State Street, Albany, N. Y. 

(Yale) 123 William, St., New York City. 

(Williams) Little Falls, N. Y. 

(Dartmouth) 120 Tremont Street, Boston, Mass. 

(U. of P.) 901 Keenan Building, Pittsburg, Pa. 

(Dartmouth) 140 Cedar Street, New York City. 

(Oberlin) Middletown, Mass. 

(Oberlin) Swarthmore, Pa. 

(Columbia) 149 Broadway, New York City. 

(Yale) 347 Broadway, New York City. 

(Haverford) care of Crosby & Fleming, Philipsburg, Pa. 

(Yale) 1942 Forbes Street, Pittsburg, Pa. 

(Hobart) 12 Howard Avenue, Utica, N. Y. 

(U. of P.) 625 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Penn. State) Woodlawn, Pa. 

(P. M. C.) 307 Fourth Avenue, Pittsburg, Pa. 

(Brown) 299 Broadway, New York City. 

(Cornell) 1 Wall Street, New York City. 

(U. of P.) 310 Stephen Girard Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 
(Lafayette) Milton, Pa. 
(Tufts) New Bedford, Mass. 
(West Point) West Point, N. Y. 
(Haverford) Haverford, Pa. 

(Haverford) 4009 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
(Wosl^yan) Washington, Conn. 
(Dartmouth) 101 Milk Street, Boston, Mass. 
Boston Herald, Boston, Mass. 
(Dartmouth) Newport, Me. 

(Brown, U. of P.) 409 Marlboro Street, Boston, Mass. 
(Bowdoin) 1420 Pine Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
(Michigan) 99 Kendall Avenue, Bellevue. Pa. 
(Brown) Girls* Latin School, Boston. Mass. 
(St. John's) U. S. Fid. & Guarantee Co., Baltimore, Md. 
(Williams) Madison Ave. and 25th St., New York City. 
(Hackley School) Tarrytown, N. Y. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



169 



Herr, E. A., 
Higley, H. R., 
Hinkey, Louis, 
Hinman, C. F., 
Hopkins, Arthur H., 
Hoskins, G. W., 
Hoskins, Thos. L., 
How, Fred., 
Howard, H. R., 
Howell, A. A., 
Hubbard, John 
Hull, T. B., 
Hurley. Dan J., 
Ingalls, Alfred W., 
Jones, Ernest F., 
Jones, Harold W., 
Jay, J. W., 
Kafer, F. W., 
Kelchner, C. S., 
Kilpatrick, C. H., 
Kindgen, Wm. J., 
Kirberger, Louis 0., 
Knolt, 0. W., 
Knox, W. F., 
Krider, Walter W., 
Lamberton, Robt. E., 
Langford, A. M., 
Langford, W. S., 
Lantz, Charles P., 
Leary, Leo H., 
Lee, Walter, 
Levene, George, 
Linn, Willis, 
Lowe, Frank W., 
MacElree. J. P., 
MacElroy, A. J., 
Macguire, E. A., 
Macreadie, A. S., 
Mahoney, John D., 
Mahoney, Matthew, 
Marshall, Carl, 
Maxwell, Robt. W., 
Mayser, Charles W., 
McAvoy, W. J., 
McCarthy, Chas. C, 
McCarthy, C. J., Jr., 
McCarthy, E. T., 
McClave, R. P., 
McFarland, Audley, 



(Dartmouth) 291 N. Main Street, Waterbury, Conn. 

(Ohio) Stevens Institute, Hoboken, N. J. 

(Yale) Tonawanda, N. Y. 

(W. Va.) LB702, Rochester, N. Y. 

(Haverford) Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Bucknell) Lewisburg, Pa. 

(Lafayette) 119 N. High Street, West Chester, Pa. 

Boston Journal, Boston, Mass. 

(Amherst) 911 Wilder Building, Rochester, N. Y. 

(Princeton) 1416 South 58th Street Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Amherst) Amherst, Mass. 

(Yale) 930 Chapel Street, New Haven, Conn. 

(Harvard) Boston City Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

(Brown) 505 Washington Street, Lynn, Mass. 

(Haverford) 60 Whalley Avenue, New Haven, Conn. 

(HaverfordX Commonwealth Shoe Co., Whitman, Mass. 

(Yale) First National Bank, Hartford, Conn. 

(Princeton) Lawrenceville, N. J. 

(Lafayette) Myerstown, Pa. 

(Union) care A. G. Spalding & Bros., 126 Nassau St., N. Y. 

(Columbia) 22 Vesey Street, New York City. 

(W. & J.) Indiana, Pa. 

(Hamilton) Clinton Street School, Schenectady, N. Y. 

(Yale) Ben Avon, Pa. 

(Swarthmore) 1170 Broadway, New York City. 

(U. of P.) Crozier Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Trinity) St. James School, Washington Co., Md. 

(Trinity) 510 Grand Central Station, New York Ciiy. 

(Gettysburg) Harrisburg Academy, Harrisburg, Pa. 

(Harvard) 709 Pemberton Bldg., Boston, Mass. 

(Bowdoin) Brunswick, Me. 

(U. of P.) Jerome and Shipman Avenues, Yonkers, N. Y. 

(Colgate) 1109 Madison Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

(Dartmouth) care Armour & Co., Worcester, Mass. 

(U. of P.) West Chester, Pa. 

(Cornell) 35 West 32d Street, New York City. 

(Fordham) 229 West 58th Street, New York City. 

(Watt, Edinborough) Portland A.C., Portland, Me. 

(U. of P.) W. Phila. H. S. for Boys, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Georgetown) Boston City Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

(Harvard) 35 Federal Street, Boston, Mass. 

(Swarthmore) ''Evening Bulletin," Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Yale) Tome School, Port Deposit, Md. 

(Lafayette) Newark, Del. 

(Georgetown) 141 Milk Street, Boston, Mass. 

Germantown Academy, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Holy Cross 1913 Master Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Princeton) Cliffside, N. J. 

(W. & J.) 715 Park Building, Pittsburg, Pa. 



170 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



McGrath, Hugh C, 
Merriman, D. W., 
Metzgar, Sol., 
Miller, Charles, 
Miller, J. A., Jr., 
Millham, Jesse B., 
Minds, J. H., 
Moffatt, James H., 
Moore, Charles C, 
Moorhead, John A., 
Morice, W. N., 
Morse, K. L., 
Morven, H. E., 
Mulford, Albert L., 
Munro, Daniel C, 
Murphy, Fred. J., 
Murphy, F. W., 
Murphy, Thomas F., 
Nelly, Lieut. H. M., 
Nesbit, James L., 
Newton, S. B., 
Noble, A. F., 
O'Brien, H. J., 
O'Brien, E. J., 
O'Connell, James E., 
O'Conner, John C, 
Okeson, W. R., 
Olcott, W. P., 
O'Neil, F. J., 
Owsley, J. E., 
Page, J. W., 
Pallotti, Francis A., 
Palmer, A. W., 
Palmer, Samuel C, 
Patch, Ralph C, 
Pauxtis, S. Francis, 
Pendleton, Joseph, 
Pfeiffer, T. N., 
Phillipy, N. G., 
Poe, Gresham H,, 
Porter, M. N., 
Pulsifer, Nathan, 
Quill, James J., 
Rafferty, E. L., 
Ramsey, Frank M., 
Rinehart, C. R., 
Risley, A. W., 
Rittman, W. F., 
Roberts, H. W., 



(Boston Coll.) 43 Tremont Street, Boston, Mass. 

(Geneva) 3209 Fifth Avenue, Beaver Falls, Pa. 

(U. of P.) Bedford, Pa. 

(Haverford) Lancaster, Pa. 

(Swarthmore) Wabash Building, Pittsburg, Pa. 

(Hamilton) 280 Lyell Avenue, Rochester, N. Y. 

(U. of P.) Mutual Life Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Princeton) Central High School, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(IT. of Me.) 38 Exchange Street, Lynn, Mass. 

(Yale) Moorhead Bros.' Co., Sharpsburg, Pa. 

(U. of P.) Water and Tasker Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Dartmouth) 471 Adams Street, North Abington, Mass. 

(N. Y. U.) University Heights, New York City. 

(U. of P.) 1623 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Bowdoin) Burlington, Yt. 

(Yale) 39 Warren Street, New York City. 

(Brown) 299 Broadway, New York City. 

(Harvard) 709 Sears Building, Boston, Mass. 

(West Point) West Point, N. Y. 

(Lafayette) Catonsville, Md. 

(U. of P.) 829 West End Avenue, New York City. 

(Amherst) 95 South Street, Boston, Mass. 

(Swarthmore) 1900 South 47th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Tufts) Boston Post. 

(Harvard) 53 State Street, Boston, Mass. 

(Dartmouth) 1037 Elm Street, Manchester, N. H. 

(Lehigh) Pnoenix Bridge Co., 49 William St., N. Y. City. 

(Yale) 30 West 44th Street, New York City. 

(Williams) 16 W r hite Memorial Bldg., Syracuse, N. Y. 

(Yale) care Yale Foot Ball Association. 

(O. W. U.) Pittsburg A. C. Pittsburg, Pa. 

(Holy Cross) 16 Village Street, Hartford, Conn. 

(Colby) Haverford School, Haverford, Pa. 

(Swarthmore) Harvard Univ., Cambridge, Mass. 

(Amherst) W T ayne, Pa. 

(U. of P.) 39 Russell Street, Edwardsville, Pa. 

(Bowdoin) 22 Warren Street, New York City. 

(Princeton) Harvard Law School, Cambridge, Mass. 

(Gettysburg) Gettysburg, Pa. 

(Princeton) 8 South Street, Baltimore, Md. 

(Colgate) Swarthmore, Pa. 

(Bates, Cornell) Lowell General Hospital, Lowell, Mass. 

(Amherst, Yale) Court House, Jersey City, N. J. 

(Princeton) 129 Bakewell Building, Pittsburg, Pa. 

(Haverford) 3601 Locust Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Lafayette) 1 Madison Avenue, New York City. 

(Colgate) 264 Partridge Street, Albany, N. Y. 

(Swarthmore) Swarthmore, Pa. 

(Tufts) L. B. 501, Syracuse. N. Y. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



171 



Robinson, Fred, 
Robison, John W., 
Roper, W. W., 
Rose, Floyd, 
Rugh, F. C, 
Saunders, Leon G., 
Sawyer, Enos K., 
Saylor, Webster, 
Scarlett, Hunter W., 
Schwartz, H. Iff., 
Scudder, E. R., 
Seeley, S. B., 
Selvage, I. Lester, 
Sharpe, A. H., 
Shaw, Reuben T., 
Sheble, J. H., Jr., 
Short, H. H., 
Sieber, Paul R., 
Sigman, Geo. A., 
Simmonds, A. P., 
Simpson, John R., 
Sinclair, Samuel, 
Smith, Paul G. 
Smith, H. F., 
Smith, S. S., 
Southworth, E. F., 
Spiers, H. W., 
Squiers, B. H., 
Stahr, Charles R., 
Stauffer, H. A., 
Stroud, C. C, 
Stuart, C. B., 
Sweet, Lynn 0., 
Swenson, Karl, 
Taggart, Edward C, 
Taussig, Charles A., 
Thompson, M. J., 
Thorn, H. N., 
Thorpe, E. J., 
Thorp, Thos. J., 
Topper, R. F., 
Torney, H. W., 
Torrey, Robert G., 
Townsend, H. C, 
Trask, T. C, 
Trout, H. E., 
Tufts, Nathan, 
Turner, L. C, 
Twitchell, F. I., 



(U. of Pittsburg) State College, Pa. 

(Jefferson) 1016 Lehigh Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Princeton) 617 Steven Girard Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 

(U. of Pittsburg) 901 Fulton Building, Pittsburg, Pa. 

(U. o? Pittsburg) 418 Berger Building, Pittsburg, Pa. 

(Stevens) Stevens Institute, Hoboken, N. J. 

(Dartmouth) Franklin, N. H. 

(F. & M.) 75 Saylor Street, Johnstown, Pa. 

(U. of P.) 22 Bodine Hall, U. of Penn., Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Hamilton) Morgan Street School, Ilion, N. Y. 

(Brown) 15 Dey Street, New York City. 

(Dickinson) Berwick, Pa. 

(Columbia) 78S Broad Street, Newark, N. J. 

(Yale) Penn Charter School, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Ohio Wesleyan) W. Phila. H. S. for Boys, Phila., Pa. 

(U. of P.) 1538 Land Title Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Princeton) 28 Thomas Street, Newark, N. J. 

(Gettysburg) 510 N. Broadway, Baltimore, Md. 

(Lafayette) 1421 Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Yale) 526 Land Title Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(F. &. M.) 5822 Ellsworth Avenue, Pittsburg, Pa. 

(Swarthmore) American House, Harrisburg, Pa. 

(Bucknell) 115 N. 2nd Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 

(Bucknell) 130 W. State Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 

(Indiana) Mercer, Pa. 

(Harvard) 314 Highland Avenue, Syracuse, N. Y. 

(Oberlin) P. and S. Club, W. 57th Street, New York City. 

(Harvard) 640 Tremont Building, Boston, Mass. 

(F. & M.) 17 E. Walnut Street, Lancaster, Pa. 

(Gettysburg), Gettysburg, Pa. 

(Tufts) University of Rochester, Rochester, N. Y. 

(Yale) 157 E. 72d Street, New York City. 

(Bucknell) care Carnegie Steel Co., Munhall, Pa. 

(U. of Pittsburg) 712 Wood Street, Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

(Rochester) 324 Pine Street, Steelton, Pa. 

(Cornell) 220 Broadway, New York City. 

(Georgetown) Wash. Coll., Chestertown, Md. 

(Haverford) 1136 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(La Salle) 16 E. 42d Street, New York City. 

(Columbia) N. Y. Evening Journal, New York City. 

(Gettysburg) Gettysburg, Pa. 

(West Point) 65 Park Avenue, New York City. 

(U. of P.) 255 S. 16th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Columbia) 107 E. 14th Street, New York City. 

(Amherst, Yale) Commercial High School, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

(Lafayette) Steelton, Pa. 

(Brown) 681 Main Street, Waltham, Mass. 

(Michigan, Dartmouth) 401 Union Bldg., Syracuse, N. Y ; 

(P. A. C.) 50 Turner Street, Portland, Me. 



172 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



Tyler, A. C, 
Vail, Louis De P., 
Vallentine, H. M., 
Vorse, Albert 0., 
Ward, W. D., 
Waring, Lee K., 
Washburne, L., 
Weeks, H. G., 
Weymouth, Clarence, 
Whiting, A. E., 
Whetstone, S. B., 
Williams, Carl S., 

Williams, J. F., 
Wolfe, Joseph M., 
Woodlock, Albert J., 
Wright, C. A., 
Young, C. V. P., 
Young, Edwin P., 
Young, Geo. H., 
Young, Homer N., 
Ziegler, A. B., 
Zimmer, Edward G., 



(Princeton) Haverford School, Haverford, Pa. 

(U. of P.) 505 Franklin Bank Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(N. Y. U.) 66 Leonard Street, New York City. 

(Bucknell) Y.M.C.A., Ardmore, Pa. 

(Princeton) 20 Grove Place, Rochester, N. Y. 

(Swarthmore) 185 Market Street, Newark, N. J. 

(Brown) 1324 Locust Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Syracuse) 235 Court Street, Binghamton, N. Y. 

(Bucknell, Yale) Wynnewood, Pa. 

(Cornell) 1025 Vine Street, Philadelphia. Pa. 

(U. of P.) 1S3 City Hall, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(U. of P.) School Lane and Greene Street, Germantown, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
(Oberlin) 356 West 57th Street, New York City. 
(Bucknell, Cornell) Lewisburg, Pa. 
Boston Globe, Boston, Mass. 
(Williams) 61 Genessee Street, Auburn, N. Y. 
(Cornell) 112 Lake Street, Ithaca, N. Y. 
(Cornell) 1167 Frick Annex, Pittsburg, Pa. 
(Cornell) 111 Market Street, Williamsport, Pa. 
(Gettysburg, Michigan) Bakewell Bldg., Pittsburg, Pa. 
(U. of P.) 3732 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
(Harvard) 605 Wilder Building, Rochester, N. Y. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



175 



INTERCOLLEGIATE CONFERENCE APPROVED LIST OF 
OFFICIALS. 

COMMITTEE ON FOOT BALL OFFICIALS. 
Prof. T. F. Moran, Purdue. 
Prof. R. E. Wilson, Northwestern. 
Prof. A. G. Smith, Iowa, Chairman. 



Allen, Harry I., 
Anderson, Dr. I., 
Anderson, John E., 
Baker, H. Iff., 
Bokum, Norris, 
Boles, L. C M 
Bradshaw, M. H., 
Burkland, Ned, 
Burroughs, W. G., 
Campbell, D., 
Carr, Harry A., 
Carrithers, I. T., 
Chalmers, John G., 
Cherrington B. M., 
Clark. D. B., 
Clarke, H. T., Jr., 
Clausen, E. W., 
Cochems, E. B., ' 
Coggeshall, H. H., 
Cole, W. B., 
Colton, C. C, 
Compton, I. T., 
Connett, W. C, 
Connor, E. F., 
Corbett, John, 
Crawford, J. A., 
Curtis, J. S., 
Daniel, George, 
Davis, Ralph, 
Dayton, R. B., 
Dunlap, Dr. D. L., 
Dyer, Ben H., 
Eckersall, W. H., 
Eckstrom, J. B. C, 
Eldridge, C. E., 
Endsley, L. E., 
E 



WESTERN UST. 

(Northwestern) 700 Commercial Bank Bldg., Chicago. 

(Missouri) 918 Independence Avenue, Kansas City, Mo. 

(Chicago) 217 Johnson Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

(0. W. U.) Faurot Block, Lima, 0. 

(Princeton) 204 Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111. 

Fostoria, O. 

(Hiram) West Side Y.M.C.A., Cleveland, 0. 

(Illinois) Peoria Water W T orks, Peoria, 111. 

(Illinois) 242 Kansas Street, Edwardsville, 111. 

(Harvard) Platteville, Wis. 

(Swarthmore, Ohio State) Sandusky, Ohio. 

(Illinois) Alma, Mich. 

(Lafayette) Dubuque, Iowa. 

(Nebraska) 511 North 16th Street, Lincoln, Neb. 

(Ohio State) Everts High School, Circleville, O. 

(Chicago) New York Life Building, Omaha, Neb. 

417 South 6th Street, Columbia, Mo. 

405 West Washington Avenue, Madison, Wis. 

(Grinnell) Des Moines, Iowa. 

(Michigan) 733 State Street, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

(Dartmouth) Alworth Building, Duluth, Minn. 

(Wooster) Wooster, 0. 

(Virginia) Third National Bank Bldg., St. Louis, Mo. 

(Bates) Lincoln High School, Cleveland, 0. 

(Harvard) Athens, Ohio. 

(Wooster) London, O. 

(Michigan) care Iola Cement Co., Iola, Kan. 

(O. W. U.) Lorain High School, Lorain, 0. 

(Princeton) care The Waverly Co., Indianapolis, Ind. 

(Marietta) New Martinsville, W. Va. 

(North Dakota) Grand Forks, N. D. 

(Texas) 1014 Scanlan Building, Houston, Tex. 

(Chicago) care Chicago Tribune, Chicago, 111. 

(Dartmouth) 1431 North High Street, Columbus, Ohio. 

(Michigan) Ann Arbor, Mich. 

(Purdue) care Purdue University, Lafayette, Ind. 



174 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



Esterline, J. Walter, 
Ferguson, Ben M., 

Fish, F. W., 
Fishleigh, W. T., 
Fleager, A. B., 
Flaeger, H. A., 
•Gale, Burton P., 

Gale, Henry, 
•Gardner, Lion, 
Graham, Gus, 
Gray, Glen C., 
Graydon, Bruce, 
Hackett, Lt. II. B., 
Hadden, Harry, 
Haggerty, Frank, 
Haines, Anthony, 
Hamill, Ralph, 
Hammond, Harry S., 
Harding, E. P., 
Hargrave, Newell, 
Harlin, Rolvix, 
Harris, R. S., 
Heneage, H. R., 
Heth, L. D., 
Hewitt, Wm. F., 
Hinaman, A. W., 
Hinzeman, H. L., 
Holderness, Jas. C, 
Houghton, M. A., 
Hyland, Mark, 
Jenkins, E. J., 
Johnson, A. F., 
Jones, T. H., 
Jones, W. D., 
Jones, G. L., 
Jones, Nyle, 
Keehn, Roy D., 
Kellogg, Nelson A., 
Kelly, Addison W., 
Kelpatrick, C. H., 
Keyser, J. H., 
Kittleman, C. W., 
Knight, W. C, 
Koehler, Dr. J. P., 
Lamhert, Guy M. f 
Lantry, Joseph T., 
Law, Fred, 



(Purdue) 145 Andrew Place, Lafayette, Ind. 

(Chicago, Purdue, Michigan) care Detroit, City Gas Co., 

Detroit, Mich. 
(Maine) 2135 Adelbert Road, Cleveland, O. 
(Michigan) 1273 Helen Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 
(Northwestern) 322 West Washington Street, Chicago, 111. 
(Northwestern) care A. G. Spalding & Bros., Chicago, 111. 
(Chicago) care Swartwout & Appenzeller, First National 

Bank Bldg., Chicago, 111. 
(Chicago) University of Chicago, Chicago, 111. 
(Illinois) 903 First National Bank, Chicago, 111. 
(Grinnell) 713 Fleming Bdg., Des Moines, Iowa. 
(Oberlin) Oberlin, 0. 
(Harvard) Cincinnati, 0. 

(West Point) care D. H. Burnham. Ry. Ex., Chicago, 111. 
(Michigan) Box 605, Kenilworth, 111. 
(Colby) Buchtel College, Akron, O. 
(Yale) Rockford, 111. 
(Chicago) Dunning, 111. 

(Michigan) 4627 Greenwood Avenue, Chicago, 111. 
(Minnesota) care Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 
(Yale) Union Trust Bldg., Cincinnati, 0. 
(Chicago) Ottawa, Kan. 

(Chicago) 836 East 45th Street. Chicago, 111. 
(Dartmouth) 5321 Jefferson Avenue, Chicago, 111. 
(Beloit) 327 North Court Street, Rockford, 111. 
(Chicago) 6140 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, 0. 
(Case) 2107 Adelbert Road, Cleveland. 0. 
(Kansas) care Y.M.C.A., Topeka, Kan. 
(Lehigh) care Eclipse Gas Stove Co., Rockford, 111. 
(Oberlin) Oberlin, O. 

(Iowa) 1506 Forest Avenue, Des Moines, Iowa. 
(Northwestern) Big Rapids, Mich. 

(Northwestern) 232 North Halsted Street, Chicago, 111. 
(Wisconsin) 403 Wolvin Building, Duluth, Minn. 
(Chicago) 6425 Monroe Avenue, Chicago, 111. 
(Harvard) 216 Clark Street, Lakeside Building, Chicago. 
(Iowa) Iowa City, Iowa. 

(Chicago, Indiana) 409 Rector Buiding, Chicago, 111. 
(Michigan) Iowa City, Iowa. 
(Princeton) University Club, Chicago, 111. 
(Wisconsin) care A. G. Spalding & Bros., Chicago, 111. 
(Wittenberg) Wittenberg College, Springfield, 0. 
(Northwestern) 161 West Harrison Street, Chicago. 
(Michigan) 122 East 7th Street, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
(Nebraska) care Y.M.C.A., Milwaukee, Wis. 
(Ames) Ames, Iowa. 
(Notre Dame) Tulsa, Okla. 
(Ames) Waterloo, Iowa. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



175 



Lowenthal, Fred, 
Masker, James, 
McCormick, J. B., 
McCray, Alfred, 
McKay, John G., 
McKnight, W. A., 
Means, Dr. Jack, 
Metcalf, Keyes D., 
Mitchell, Ledyard, 
Mumma, Capt. M. C, 
Nichols, J. H., 
Patton, E. E., 
Patton, Walter C, 
Peterson, Dr. E. A., 
Pollock, Julian, 
Porter, F. S., 
Potts, J. F., 
Prince, Percy S., 
Reid. A. G., 
Peiter. B. F., 
Rix, J. Burton, 
Bobbins, W. D., 
Pogrer, Dr. J. W., 
Rupert, Lewis, 
Pussell, Clarence W., 
Safford, Orrin, 
Sampson, P. B., 
Schmitt, Wm. C, 
Seymour, P. F., 
Short, Chas. W., 
Short, Chas. W., Jr., 
Siler, P. W., 
Simmons, Clayton B., 
Snow, Niel W., 
Snyder, J. Royal, 
Sprow, W. E., 
Stahl, Garland, 
St. Clair, P. S., 
Steele, Geo. H. f 
Stevens, R. W., 
Stuart, T. M., Jr., 
Swain, H. P., 
Teetzel, Clarence, 
Tighe, C. P., 
Vanderboom, E. J., 
Van Duyne, C, 
Van Surdam, H. E., 
Van Voorhoes, F., 
Vincenheller, G. A., 



(Illinois) 704-112 Clark Street, Chicago, 111. 

(Northwestern) care Kansas City A.C., Kansas City, Mo. 

(Princeton) 3405 Lawndale Avenue. Chicago. 

(Cincinnati) 504 Reibold Building, Dayton, Ohio. 

(Westminster) Lemcke Annex, Indianapolis, Ind. 

(Illinois) Association Hall, Champaign, 111. 

(U. of P.) Starling Medical College. Columbus, O. 

(Oberlin) Oberlin, O. 

(Yale) Mitchell Furniture Co., Cincinnati, 0. 

(West Point) Iowa City, Iowa. 

(Oberlin) Oberlin, 0. 

(0. W. U.) Coshocton, 0. 

(Antioch) Springfield, 0. 

(Ohio Wesleyan) Grad. Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio. 

(Cornell) care Block-Pollock Co., Cincinnati, 0. 

(Cornell) S21 Railway Exchange, Chicago, 111. 

(0. W. U.) University School, Cleveland, O. 

(Tufts) care Louisiana Ind. Institute, Ruston, La. 

(Michigan) Waterloo, Iowa. 

(Wesleyan) Second Street, Marietta, 0. 

(Dartmouth) Sherman, Tex. 

(Nebraska) 64 Illinois Street, Chicago Heights, 111. 

(Cincinnati) Granville, 0. 

(Miami, Wisconsin) 505 Long Buiding, Kansas City, Mo. 

(Chicago) 5401 Jefferson Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

(Minnesota) care Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 

(Kansas State Normal) Springfield T.S., Emporia Kan. 

(Notre Dame) Notre Dame, Ind. 

(Springfield) Cedar Falls, Iowa. 

(Harvard) Union Trust Bldg., Cincinnati, 0. 

(Harvard) care Short, Stanton & Co., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

(Illinois) care Central High School, St. Louis, Mo. 

(Colgate) Kirisville, Mo. 

(Michigan) care Detroit Twist Drill Co., Detroit, Mich. 

(Mt. Union, Harvard) 307 Williamson Bldg, Cleveland, 0. 

(Wabash) Ann Arbor, Mich. 

(Illinois) 4744 Kimbark Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

(Iowa) Epworth University, Oklahoma City, Okla. 

(Indiana) Presbyterian Hospital, Chicago, 111. 

(Northwestern) 2441 O Street, Lincoln, Neb. 

(Michigan) Golden, Col. 

(Dickinson) 53 W. Fourth Avenue, Columbus, O. 

(Michigan) 6700 Wentworth Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

(Indiana) Odd Fellows' Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 

(Wisconsin) Marinette, Wis. 

(Arkansas) Little Rock, Ark. 

(Wesleyan, Conn.) Fort Bliss, Tex. 

(Denison) Granville, 0. 

(Arkansas) Fayetteville, Ark. 



176 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



Waugh, Orlo L., (Syracuse) care Allis-Chalmers Univ, Club, Milw'kee, Wis. 

Waughtel, S. H., (Lebanon) Marietta, 0. 

Weaver, Harrison, (0. W. U.) Miamisburg, 0. 

W T eeds, G. W. M., (Pennsylvania) Topeka, Kan. 

Weeks, H. C, (Syracuse) care United Appliances Co., 181 Yan Buren 

Street, Chicago, 111. 

White, E. A., (Illinois) care Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. 

Whittemore A. H., (Brown) Palmer Block, Vermillion, S. D. 

Wood, J. P., Jr., (Ohio) Athens, 0. 

Wrenn, Everts, (Harvard) care People's Gas Building, Chicago, 111. 

Zinn, Fred H., (Kenyon) Sandusky, O. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



177 



SOUTHERN LIST. 

Names suggested by 

Prof. W. L. Dudley, Vanderbilt University. 

Prof. Riggs, Clemson College. 

Prof. W. A. Lambeth, Univ. of Virginia, Chairman. 



Armstrong, Richard, 
Barry, C. M., 
Barry, J. E., 
Benet, Christie, 
Blake, D. B., Jr., 
Bocock, J. B., 
Butler, Geo. P., 
Chez, Anthony W., 
Conden, F. D., 
Cresson, C. C, 
Donnelly, Chas. F., 
Graham, R. C, 
Haligan, J. E., 
Hamilton, E. J., 
Heald, Wister M., 
Holland, J. G., 
Jackson, Ellis L., 
Jennings, Geo. A., 
Johnson, Branch, 
Johnson, Hammond, 
Kern, H. A., 
Kersburg, H. E., 
Kirby, Thomas, 
McClain, W. T., 
Nalle, B. C, 
Phillips, Henry D., 
Shaughnessy, F. J., 
Sugden, Walter S., 
Suter, Herman, 
Tichenor, W. R., 
Tutwiler, E. H., 
Walker, Bradley, 
Watkins, T. Frank, 
W hi taker, Joel, 
Williams, C. R., 



(Yale) Hampton, Va. 

(Georgetown) Chamberlaine Building, Norfolk, Va. 
(Georgetown) Norfolk, Va. 
(Virginia) Columbia, S. C. 
Nashville, Term. 
(Georgetown) Blacksburg, Va. 
Augusta, Ga. 

(W. Va. University) Morgantown, W. Va. 
Washington, D. C. 
(Princeton) San Antonio, Texas. 
(Holy Cross) 2250 Ontario Road, Washington, D. 0, 
(Virginia) Norton, Va. 

(Mass. Agri.) University Place, Baton Rouge, La. 
First National Bank Building, Nashville, Tenn. 
(Virginia) Lynchburg, Va. 
Edgefield, S. C. 

(Baltimore City. Coll.) Norfolk Landmark, Norfolk, Va. 
(Bucknell) Sistersville, W. Va. 

(Virginia) 36 Virginia Bank & Trust Bldg., Norfolk, Va. 
(Virginia) 36 Virginia Bank & Trust Bldg., Norfolk, Va. 
(Randolph) Jackson, Miss. 
(Harvard) Paducah, Ky. 

(Georgetown) 203 I Street, Washington, D. 0. 
Tennessee Trust Building, Memphis, Tenn. 
Charlotte, N. C. 
(U. of the South) Atlanta Ga. 
(Notre Dame) Roanoke, Va. 
(Harvard) Sistersville, W. Va. 
(Princeton) Washington, D. C. 
Atlanta, Ga. 

Brown Marx Building, Birmingham. Ala. 
(Virginia) Nashville, Tenn. 
(Virginia) 607 McDuffy Street, Anderson, S. 0. 
Raleigh, N. C. 
(Virginia) 408 Terry Building, Roanoke, Va. 




1, E. Ingraham, Asst. Mgr. ; 2, Fisher; 3, Myer; 4, Propst; 5, Waite; 6, 
Keeve; 7, Kallttt; 8, Reidpath; 9, E. Snyder, Mgr.; 10, Fogg; 11, Pinder; 12, 
Darby; 13, H. Hartman, Capt. ; 14, Camp; 15, Ayling; 10, Waldron; 17, 
Frye; 18, Wilkinson. 

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY. 




1, Cobb, Coach; 2, Harris; 3, Whalen, Mgr.; 4, Warner; 5, Ahrens; 6, Webb; 
7, Monnee; 8, Patterson; 9, Henderson; 10, Angilly; 11, Sullivan; 12, Briden; 
13, Minor, Capt.; 14, Doll; 15, Sherwin; 16, Davis. Horton, Photo. 

RHODE ISLAND STATE COLLEGE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 179> 

Foot Ball in New England 

By J. B. Pendleton, Bowdoin. 

The quality of foot ball shown last year in New England was dis- 
tinctly high class. The coaches as well as the players seemed to have 
grasped more of the possibilities of the new game, and that the spec- 
tators thoroughly enjoyed it goes without saying. The new rules had. 
a tendency to open up the plays and their proper enforcement worked 
for a lessening of injuries. For the first time in years the players 
seemed to thrive on the sport and not only enjoyed playing, but came 
out of each contest in a physical condition that was most pleasing. 
The games were as hard fought, and the demand for quick thinking 
and quick action tended to keep each one on the alert. In a word 
this made it an ideal game, and mere strength, weight and brute force 
were qualities that were relegated to the side lines, to stay there 
forever, we hope. 

Brown, favored by an ideal coaching force, showed early in the sea- 
son the makings of a wonderful eleven. As usual, she was off her 
stride in the Pennsylvania game and so deceived many who were not 
close observers. At Harvard, she showed the power and speed that 
later were to be used to humiliate Yale, and cause all followers of the 
sport to realize that here was a team exactly suited to the new game 
and one that was coached as few teams have been in recent years. 

Dartmouth, as usual, had a fast and powerful lot of candidates 
and her first indication of form came in the Williams game. It seemed 
impossible that day to prevent not only ends but other line men from 
going down under kicks, and the result was a Waterloo for Williams.. 
Her game with Princeton, while resulting in a defeat, yet left her in_ 
the minds of most impartial critics as Princeton's equal. Later, 
against the wonderful Harvard eleven, she showed power but did not 
have the necessary skill to accomplish what so many Dartmouth men 
had hoped for. 

Trinity again came into the limelight and stayed there, showing more 
speed and variety of plays than any team playing in the East. Vic- 
tories over all early opponents, and many of them not of a minor 
class, taxed her strength too much, for her subs were few, and in the 
final West Point game, for the first time, she met defeat. Here, as 
sometimes happens, with some of her best men injured and others, 
thoroughly worn out from a hard schedule, things broke wrong for 
her, and the resulting score did not do her justice. To me her work: 
is a revelation, for her squad is probably the smallest in New England,, 
but what they lack in numbers, they make up in spirit and are doubly 
blessed by a coach who has grasped the beauties and possibilities of 
modern foot ball. 

Amherst had the complete satisfaction of a good showing against 
Dartmouth, a win over Wesleyan and a victory over Williams. Here 
also good coaching showed its value. 

Williams looks forward to a successful season and, although good 
losers, do not like to contemplate the misfortunes of last year's team. 
They have the pluck and proper spirit and before snow flies will 
make some of the teams realize that the little college in the Berk- 
shires can come back. 




1, Faherty, Mgr. ; 2, R. P. Hunter, Coach; 3, Long-; 4, Connolly; 5, Freixas; 
6, Talliaferro; 7, Mueller; 8, James Gatelv; 9, Hinchman; 10, Francis; 11, 
Fuccy, Capt. ; 12, Hopkins; 13, Bcnitez; 14, D' Alton; 15, John Gately; 16, 
McGehee. 

ROCK HILL COLLEGE, ELLICOTT CITY. MD. 




1, E. Stebbins, Mgr. ; 2, Palmer; 3, McCain; 4, Bayless; 5, D. Wood; 6, Hume; 
7, Warner; 8, Donnelly; 9, Robbins; 10, C. Reynolds, Coach; 11, Cook; 12, 
Barker: 13, Van Ingen; 34, Barmore, 15, R. Wood; 16, Hancock; 17, 
Phys. Dir. 

HOBART COLLEGE. GENEVA. N. Y. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 181 

Tufts did not have as successful a season as usual, but they cer- 
tainly made desperate efforts to win some of their more important 
games. With the large number of students and proper coaching, there 
is no reason why this college should not put out winning teams. The 
number of graduates from which they can draw a coaching staff is 
somewhat limited and for a time, at least, it might be advisable for 
them to have help from outside. 

Bow T doin had an unusually successful season in Maine, and in fact 
foot ball there is now on a par with the game as played among the 
larger universities. The one drawback is lack of experienced material, 
for as a rule the freshmen have not had the benefit of skillful coach- 
ing before entering college. Alumni throughout the country are just 
as interested in Maine, Colby, Bates and Bowdoin and await the re- 
sults of their games with as keen an interest as do those of the "Big 
Four." 

Wesleyan is just beginning to find herself and in the coming season 
bids fair to return to the foot ball map, a place she once held when 
some of the other New England colleges were without teams, for at 
one time she was in the Big League and her battles were with Penn- 
sylvania, Harvard, Yale and Princeton. Later she humbled her oppo- 
nents in the New England College League and only recently has she 
had teams of poor caliber. Last season saw a beginning and all Wes- 
leyan are optimists at present. 

Andover again won from her great rival, Exeter. In foot ball this 
is getting to be a habit and one cannot blame the Exonians for being 
impatient. They win their share in track and base ball (both this 
year) and, as usual, will start with bright prospects and maybe prove 
to be the favorites the night before the game, but somehow that An- 
dover crowd are never beaten by midseason form and seem to have the 
faculty of rising to the occasion in their one big game. Still, this 
does not mean that the long lane has not a turn and they all look 
forward each year to November, to learn if it is to be this season or 
another. 

All-America teams and All-New England teams are no longer a 
thing to be settled by any one critic, and so this year, I am going to 
select eleven men whom I think could, with proper coaching, give any 
of the "Big-Four" a game that would be highly interesting. This 
team is not necessarily the best that could be picked, but nevertheless 
it looks pretty good to the writer. As usual, Harvard and Yale players 
have not been considered, as this article concerns conditions at the 
other New England colleges. 

Daley (Dartmouth) and Ashbaugh (Brown), ends. 

Smith (Brown) and Sherwin (Dartmouth), tackles. 

Whitmore (Dartmouth) and Corp (Brown), gruards. 

Sisson (Brown), center. 

Spracklingf (Brown), quarter-back, 

Ramsdell (Trinity) and Ingrersoll (Dartmouth), half-backs. 

McKay (Brown), full-back. 




1, Pharr; 2, Erwin; 3, Kluttz, Capt. ; 4, Phipps; 5, Neal; 6, VanDevanter; 7, 
Graham; 8, Simmons', Coach; 9, McQueen; 10, Alexander; 11, Currie; 12, 
Richardson; 13, Booe; 14, Cashion; 15, Wolfe. Morse, Photo. 

DAVIDSON (N. C.) COLLEGE. 




i; 2, Pike; 3, Hu 

7, Linley; 8, Flye; 9, Edwards, Capt.; 10, Duncan; 11, Carleton; 12, Phillips; 

13, Harris. Robinson, Photo. 

ROLLINS COLLEGE. WINTER PARK. FLA. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 183; 



Foot Ball in Western Pennsylvania 

By Edward M. Thierry, Pittsburg. 

As Perm State College was the big noise in Western Pennsylvania 
intercollegiate foot ball circles during the 1909 season, so was the 
University of Pittsburg team during the season of 1910. The only 
difference was that Pitt stands out pre-eminent among the so-called 
"Big Five" teams. These elevens are Pitt, State, Washington and 
Jefferson, West Virginia University and Carnegie Tech. 

Pitt easily captured the championship, with the greatest record 
that has ever been made by a team representing that institution. 
Incidentally the team scored more points than any other college 
organization in the country, and, besides the Navy, was the only team 
not scored on. The Pitt team rolled up a total of 283 points, win- 
ning nine games out of nine played, while not a single point was 
secured by opposing players. The Midshipmen were the only others 
to preserve a clean slate. They scored only 99 points, however, and 
won but seven games and tied one. 

Pittsburgers are even claiming the championship of the State, 
asserting that the University of Pennsylvania had nothing on them. 
The fact that Penn's score of 10 to against Penn State was bet- 
tered by Pitt, by winning 11 to on Thanksgiving Day, is the ground 
for the claim. Both of Pitt's touchdowns against State were scored 
without the aid of flukes, while stories of the Penn-State game, 
played earlier in the season, indicated that fumbles cut a prominent 
figure in the Quakers' victory. It was also- declared that Pitt played 
25 per cent, better foot ball against State than Penn did, and that 
the 'arger score at the close of the season indicated greater strength 
than Penn, who played State several weeks earlier. 

The claim of Pitt to the championship was substantiated on 
Thanksgiving Day, when the team won from State, 11 to 0, on 
Forbes Field, Pittsburg, before a crowd of 18,000 people. Ten days 
previously Pitt defeated W. & J., the only other formidable rival, 14 
to 0. The other two members of the "Big Five" were easy victims ; 
Tech went down to defeat on Novembr 19 by a score of 35 to 0„ 
while West Virginia was defeated, 38 to 0. Another notable victory 
was over Georgetown, Pitt winning, 17 to 0, on October 22. Ohio* 
University was defeated, 71 to 0, this being the high score of the 
year. Other victories were over Ohio Northern University, 36 to 0; 
over Westminster College, 18 to 0, and over Waynesburg College, 
42 to 0. 

While State defeated Tech 61 to 0, it was the first game of the 
season. State played Penn October 22, losing, 10 to 0, while on the 
following Saturday Villanova held State to a — score, while on 
Thanksgiving Day W. & J. defeated Villanova, 9 to 0. Even at 
that W. & J. did not have the team that institution has boasted of 
in former years. It was only a shadow of its former self and had 
to be rated below State. The Western Pennsylvania rating is Pitt.- 
first ; State, second; W. & J., third; West Virginia, fourth, and 
Tech, fifth. 

W. \& J.'s backsliding was evidenced after the close of the season, 
when the Pittsburg Dispatch critic failed to pick a single member of 
the W. & J. team on his mythical All-Western Pennsylvania eleven. 
His selections were entirely from the Pitt and State teams. The 
Pittsburg Leader critic was more charitable, giving tackle McDowell* 




1, W. Sheridan, Mgr. ; 2, Barry; 3, Mooney, 4, Tomerlin; 5, Malloy; 6, R. 
Topper, Coach; 7, N. O'Neill, Asst. Mgr.; 8, McMorris; 9, Filarmery; 10. 
McGuire; 11, Gardner; 12, Engel; 13, Giraux; 14. Ganghan; 15. Fagan, Capt.; 
16, Wymard; 17, Holohan; IS, Flanagan; 19, Burke. The Firm, Photo. 

MX. ST. MARY'S COLLEGE. EMMITSBURG. MD. 







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1 Taft- 2 Ver Wiebe: 3. Bnrhoe: 4, Deane, Asst. Mgr.; 5, Butler; 6, 
Alvord- 7 Murrav; 8, Cannon; 9, Carpenter; 10. Underhill; 11, Smith, Capt.; 
12. Starr' Mgr.:' 13. Colburn; 14. Collins; 15. Brehmer; 16, Kelley; 17, 
Hemenwav; 18. Thompson; 19, Burwell; 20, Bureh. 

NORWICH UNIVERSITY. NORTHFIELD. VT. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 135 

and half-back Wallace preference over tackle Harlow of State and 
balf-back Hittner of Pitt, respectively, all the other selections being 
Pitt and State men. 

To Joe Thompson, head coach of the Pitt team, must be given 
much of the credit for the year's great work on the gridiron. He 
was chosen coach in 1909 and brought the team into second place in 
that, year, defeating W. & J., but losing to State. He put the track 
team into first pFace and in 1910 won the foot ball championship. 
He was formerly captain of the Pitt team (then known as W. U. P.) 
and was later coach of the Geneva College team. 

The bright stars in the Pitt line-up were Captain "Tex" Richards, 
full-back, and "Polly'' Galvin, center. The Dispatch critic picked 
both men on his All-America team, while the Leader critic gave 
Galvin a similar honor, but preferred Mercer of Penn to Richards at 
full-back. Galvin eclipsed the great work of Jack Turner, who was 
a sensation at center for Pitt in 1907, when he was picked by the 
writer as All-America material. Galvin excelled in every department 
of the game, while Richards was supreme at carrying the ball. Jack 
Lindsay end, picked by the Leader, will likely be the 1911 captain. 
Dewar of Pitt easily outshone all quaiter-backs. State's best men 
were Piolette and Very, ends ; Weaver, tackle ; Gray, guard, and 
Engel, half-back. As stated, W. & J., West Virginia and Tech had 
few stars. 

The champion Pitt team will remain practically intact for the 
season of 1911, the only player lost by graduation being Captain 
Richards. The title earned by the team is really the championship 
of Central and Western Pennsylvania, and it is hoped in 1911 that 
a game will be arranged with Penn in order to determine State 
honors. 

The other prominent colleges in Western Pennsylvania in foot ball 
circles were Westminster, Geneva, Grove City, Allegheny and Waynes- 
burg. They belong to the Western Pennsylvania Intercollegiate 
League, and Westminster, after a hard campaign, won the champion- 
ship of the league. This was accomplished by a victory over Grove 
City on Thanksgiving Day, 11 to 0. Previous to that these teams 
had been tied for top honors. Allegheny received third rating. 

Pittsburg High School again carried off honors in interscholastic 
circles. The prep schools of Western Pennsylvania had a warm fight, 
but the Pittsburg High team again triumphed, although its coach, 
Andrew Kerr, was incapacitated on account of a serious illness and 
most of the 1909 players were lost by graduation. Homer Roe, 1909 
captain of the University of Pittsburg and All-Western Pennsylvania 
selection for left end in that year, took hold and rounded out a 
championship team. Basing the merits of the different teams on 
comparative scores, East Liberty Academy is entitled to second place, 
Wilkinsburg High School third and Shadyside Academy fourth. 
Pittsburg High defeated East Liberty and Shadvside ; Wilkinsburg 
defeated Shadyside, and East Liberty defeated Wilkinsburg. 

The Pittsburg Gazette-Times, in selecting an all-star school team, 
included Kiski School players, but the Leader critic confined the 
selection to the high school and academy players of the other teams 
mentioned. Kiski had a good team, but should really be classed with 
normal schools. Indiana Normal won the normal title by defeating 
Kiski, the other normal schools being Slippery Rock and California. 

Another gratifying feature of the 1910 foot ball season, to Pitts- 
burgers at least, was the almost unanimous selection by Eastern 
critics of James W. Scully, Jr., of Pittsburg, as left tackle on the 
All-America team. Scully played a great game for Yale during the 
1910 campaign. 









1, Jack; 2, Lynn, Coach; 3, Stevens; 4, Sieber, Asst. Coach; 5, Yost; 6, 
Haynes, Mgiv; 7, Sears; 8, Hill; 9, D. Riley; 10, Brady; 11, Ray: 12, Belt; 
13, Ellicott; 14, Paulus; 15, Musser; 16, Catlin; 17, Tappen; 18, Disney; 19, 
Riley; 20, Shaffer; 21, DuBray; 22, Dodson; 23, Darsey; 24, V. Bridgman; 
25, Woods; 26, Penniman; 27, Fulton; 28, Bishop; 29, Stollenwerk, Capt. ; 30, 
■Gillet; 31, Michael; 32, Bridgman; 33, Pieper; 31, McCabe. Halleni, Photo. 
JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY. 




1, Huey, Asst. Mgr. ; 2, Biddle; 3, Meegan; 4, Porter, Capt.; 5, Wright; 6, 
Merredith; 7, Huston, Mgr.: S, M. J. Thompson, Coach; 9, Rowland; 10, 
Garrett; 11, Gary: 12, Hackett; 13, Crew; 14, Bauby; 15, Branham; 16, 
Oimininera; 17, Jones: IS. Burris; 19. Krantz. 

WASHINGTON COLLEGE. CHESTERTOWN. MD. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



187 



Following are the all-star foot ball selections made by Pittsburg 
newspaper critics for the season of 1910 : 



ALL-AMERICA 
Pittsburg Leader. 

End Kilpatrick, Yale. 

Tackle Scully, Yale. 

Guard Benbrook, Michigan. 

Center Galvin, Pittsburg. 

Guard Brown, Navy. 

Tackle Withington, Harvard. 

End Daly, Dartmouth. 

Quarter-back Sprackling, Brown. 

Half-back Magidsohn, Michigan. 

Half-back Pendleton, Princeton. 

Full-back Mercer, Pennsylvania. 



TEAMS. 

Pittsburg Dispatch. 
Kilpatrick, Yale. 
Scully, Yale. 
Benbrook, Michigan. 
Galvin, Pittsburg. 
Fisher, Harvard. 
McKay, Harvard. 
Smith, Harvard. 
Sprackling, Brown. 
Magidsohn, Michigan. 
Wendell, Harvard. 
Richards, Pittsburg. 



ALL- WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA TEAMS. 

Pittsburg Leader. Pittsburg Dispatch. 

End Piolette, Penn State. Piolette, Penn State. 

Tackle McDowell, Wash, and Jeff. Harlow, Penn State. 

Guard Blair, Pittsburg. Blair, Pittsburg. 

Center Galvin, Pittsburg. Galvin, Pittsburg. 

Guard Gray. Penn State. Dallenbach, Pittsburg 

Tackle Weaver, Penn State. Weaver, Penn State. 

End Lindsay, Pittsburg. Very, Penn State. 

Quarter-back Dewar, Pittsburg. Dewar, Pittsburg. 

Half-back Wallace, Wash, and Jeff. Engel, Penn State. 

Half-back Engel, Penn State. Hittner, Pittsburg. 

Full-back Richards, Pittsburg. Richards, Pittsburg. 

ALL-WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA SCHOLASTIC TEAMS. 

Pittsburg Leader. Pittsburg Gazette-Times. 

End Lyons, Pittsburg High. Lyons, Pittsburg High. 

Tackle Gass, Pittsburg High. Gass, Pittsburg High. 

Guard Parkin, Shadyside Acad. Parkin, Shadyside Acad. 

Center Shaw, Pittsburg High. Taylor, Kiski. 

Guard Blumenthal, E. Liberty Acad. Blumenthal, E. Liberty Acad. 

Tackle Miller, Shadyside Acad. Furry, Kiski. 

End Ewing, Pittsburg High. Ewing, Pittsburg High. 

Quarter-back Glick, Pittsburg High. Morris, Kiski. 

Halfback Erickson, Pittsburg High. McCarter, Beaver Falls High. 

Half-back McConnell, Shadyside Acad. Sheren. Kiski. 

Full-back McCutcheon, Pittsburg High. Younkin, Butler High. . 




1, Lnehrmann ; 2, Coleman; 3, Sinclair; 4, Patterson; 5, Elmer; 6, Burt; 7, 
Spalding; 8, Robinson; 9, Golden, Mgr. ; 10, J. Heisman, Coach: 11, Neel, 
Asst. Mgr.; 12, Lewis; 13, Goree; 14, Jenkins; 15, Johnson; 16. Hill, Capt.; 
17, Luck; 18, DuBard; 19, Cook. Hirshburg, Photo. 

GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY, ATLANTA. GA. 











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1, Gresham, Mgr.; 2, Lawrence; 3, Foxworth; 4, Norman; 5, Conger; 6, 
Hogg; 7, Binion: 8, Joy, Asst. Coach: 9, Marett; 10. Cook; 11, Davison; 12, 
McPaniel; 13, Zellars; 14. Dr. Stroud, Coach; 15, Herndon; 16, Grice; 17, 
Dunaway, Capt.; 18, Kelley; 19, Burns; 20, West. 

MERCER UNIVERSITY. MACON. GA. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 189 



Review of 1910 Foot Ball Season in 

Ohio 

By L. W. St. John, Athletic Director, Ohio Wesleyan University. 

Any general review of the season in Ohio may well be prefaced with 
the threadbare assertion that it was successful. It was unusually so. 
A clear title to the championship of Ohio Conference colleges was 
acquired, Oberlin being the fortunate bidder. Interest in the revised 
game, good at the start, grew better as the season progressed. The 
revised code of playing rules made good with player and spectator. 
The prohibition <Dn pushing and pulling unquestionably opened up the 
game, eased up the smashing attack on the line, eliminated some of 
the chances for injury, placed a greater premium than before on speed, 
agility and quick thinking. While the importance of the individual is 
increased — he may not be shoved or pulled through an opening — the 
science of team work is also increased. Interference must be clean 
-cut, at the right time, in the right place, to enable the good individual 
to make the necessary advance. 

Foot ball, under the present rules, is a more beneficial game to the 
active player than ever before in its history. Its educational training 
— the mental and physical excellence demanded — has never been 
equalled. 

Ohio foot ball instructors in general made good with the game. 
While its possibilities were by no means developed to any wonderful 
degree of perfection, the quality of the game played was equal to 
that shown in any section of the country. 

Case and Ohio State played tie games with the slowly "developing 
Michigan team. Oberlin played Cornell to a standstill, to 0, the third 
game on Cornell's schedule. Reserve, not at their best, played a losing 
game with the exceptionally strong Navy at Annapolis in November, 
but a 17 to defeat at the hands of the Navy was no disgrace. No 
team was able to score on the Navy last year. 

One feature of th^ 1910 season in Ohio should not be overlooked. 
It had much to do with the instant success of the new features. For 
coaches, officials and players it cleared the foot ball atmosphere, 
avoided much misunderstanding, and was of inestimable value in many 
ways. We refer to the meeting held in Cleveland, arranged for by 
Director Savage of Oberlin and conducted by the dean of American foot 
ball, Walter Camp. It was largely attended and its influence for 
good was far reaching. 

Ohio and Ohio foot ball is worthy of a similar meeting every year. 
The expense to Conference colleges is very slight and of no conse- 
quence at all compared to the benefit derived in the way of more uni- 
form and more efficient officiating. Columbus would be a much more 
accessible point for the great number of Ohio colleges. 

At the close of the 1909 season the big Ohio Conference Trophy cup, 
which had been battled for so many seasons, finally passed into the 
permanent possession of Case School. 

The Cleveland Plaindealer this year has given a beautiful trophy 
to be contested for during the next ten years. Oberlin is the present 
possessor. 




1, Waite; 2, Carleton; 3, Shepherd; 4, Cobb; 5, Smith; 6, Strout, Mgr.; 7, 
Reilly, Asst. Coach; 8, Smiley; 9, Eales; 10, Tipping; 11, Murry; 12. Bearce: 
13, Wingard, Head Coach; 14, Buck; 15, Bigalow; 16, Crowell: 17. Parker, 
Capt.; 18, Whitney; 19, MacNeil; 20, Cook; 21. King. 

UNIVERSITY OF MAINE, ORONO. ME. 




1, W. Cole, Mgr.; 2, A. Knight, Asst. Mgr.; 3, E. Soule; 4, Good; 5, Beach; 
6, C. Soule: 7, Kepple; 8, Welch: 9. Bognall; 10. Sturtevant: 11, Ervin; 12, 
Packard; 13, Hamilton; 14, Rogers. Capt.; 13, Vait; 16, Mikelsky. 
COLBY COLLEGE. WATERVILLE. ME. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 191 

In brief, the conditions governing the trophy are : Only Ohio 
Conference colleges entitled to compete, and Conference games only 
■considered in awarding the trophy. Each team shall play at least five 
-other Conference elevens, at least two of which shall be Oberlin, Ohio 
State, Case or Western Reserve. On Deecmber 1, 1919, it is to be 
awarded to the college which has won the trophy the largest number 
of times during the ten years, each annual winner retaining possession 
until another champion has been declared. 

iSOME FACTS, FIGURES AND COMMENTS ON THE OHIO CON- 
FERENCE GAMES AND SEASON. 
The Ohio Conference College record shows the following : 

Played. Won. Lost. Tied. 

Oberlin 4 3 1 

Case 6 5 1 

Ohio State 7 4 1 2 

Reserve 7 4 3 

Denison 8 3 3 2 

Wesleyan 6 3 3 

Wooster 6 1 4 1 

Kenyon 6 1 5 

Miami 1 1 

Wittenburg 4 4 

Ohio University 1 1 

Oberlin takes first place, and while there are some features that 
'detract from the glory that goes with the honors, there are also other 
features which make the team and the school fully worthy of all honor 
.and respect. At the opening of the season, Coach Snyder was con- 
fronted with the problem of filling places left vacant by eight of his 
1909 regulars. To fill the many gaps the material, while well grounded 
;by good and efficient coaching, was inexperienced and light. But the 
extraordinary pluck, the fighting ability, the wonderful unity and 
smoothness of team play, the hearty and enthusiastic support of the 
team by the student body, enabled the team, with the excellent coaching 
of Harvey Snyder, to secure results quite marvelous when conditions 
are considered. These things make of more importance the fact that 
•Case was beaten 6 to ; Reserve, by the narrow margin of 8 to 6, and 
Ohio State held to a to score by what was probably the lightest 
team ever to claim championship honors in Ohio and a team shortest 
in actual 'varsity experience. No small measure of the team's success 
must be given to quarter-back Nichols. The unanimous choice for All- 
Ohio quarter-back, he was a tower of strength to Oberlin and a dan- 
gerous man to every opponent. Cool, resourceful, fast and agile, won- 
derful in offense and strong in defense, it is hard to say too much of 
this wonderful little player who, by his perfect sportsmanship and 
great skill, has won the honor and respect of every observer. 

Case, under the leadership of Captain Twitchell and Coach Joe Fogg, 
ranks a close second, suffering their only defeat of the season at the 
hands of Oberlin. They did what Oberlin was unable to do — defeated 
Ohio State ; tied Michigan, 3 to 3, and decisively defeated the strong 
"but erratic Denison eleven, 15 to 3. While the material at Case is 
•good and spirit excellent, at no place is the development of a team 
beset with more difficulties. Because of heavy work and late periods 
imuch of the practice must be conducted by artificial light. The college 
„year opening late, with no preliminary practice allowed, and the short 



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1, Montgomery; 2, Rice? 3, Murphy; 4, Francis; 5, Miller, Asst. Mgr.; 6, 

McCarthy; 7, Wentworth: 8. Laggren: 9. Durling; 10, Gillies: 11. Bernhard; 

12, Mitchell, Capt.; 13, Bacon; 14, Eustis. Welker, Photo. 

WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY. MIDDLETOWN. CONN. 



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I, Prof. Gettell, Coach; 2, Lawlor; 3, Clark; 4, Hudson; 5, Bleecker; 6, 
Skinner. Mgr.; 7. Gidersleeve; 8, Cook; 9, Howell; 10, E. Ramsdell, Capt.; 

II, Carroll; 12, Collett; 13, Ahern. Randall, Photo. 

TRINITY COLLEGE. nARTFORD, CONN. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 193 

practice sessions or practicing by electric lights are handicaps not 
many teams would overcome as does Case School of Applied Science. 

The season at Ohio State was rather disappointing, bringing to that 
school a ranking of third in the Ohio Conference. No discredit is 
attached to Coach Howard Jones, whose ability as player and coach 
is well established. The material for a strong and well balanced team 
was simply not at hand. On the offense, far too large a percentage 
of the attack fell upon the shoulders of Captain Wells. Though show- 
ing some superiority over the champion Oberlin team, the best that 
State could do was a — score. Denison also drew a tie with State, 
5 — 5. Defeat at the hands of Case in a hard fought, seesawing game 
in Cleveland was the worst setback of the season to State. Vaughn, 
the Yale end, who takes up the work at State this fall, will face a dif- 
ficult problem. The loss of Wells, Powell, Hall, and Olds makes a 
large drain on the strength of the squad. These will be hard men to 
replace. 

Reserve forces were under the direction of Xen Scott, who had pre- 
viously served as the able assistant to Coach Seaman. While Re- 
serve's record was not brilliant, it is generally considered that Scott 
did very well with the material at his command. Victories over 
Wooster, Wesleyan, Kenyon and Denison of the Conference teams were 
creditable. An early victory over the strong Buchtel College team is 
worth mention. Wells helped State to a victory over Reserve by two 
field goals. Defeats at the hands of Oberlin and Case were by small 
margins. Reserve played a hard schedule and handled it well. 

Denison was erratic as usual and produced some surprises for oppo- 
nents, as well as giving supporters some chagrin. Defeat at the hands 
of Kenyon, a tie score with Wooster, — 0, and a crushing defeat by 
the University of Cincinnati were unexpected results. A victory over 
Wesleyan and a tie with Ohio State were equally unexpected and about 
balanced accounts at the Baptist school. By including the weaker 
members, Denison played more Conference games than any other college. 

Ohio Wesleyan, though defeated by Denison, is deserving of equal 
ranking with this college. Carelessness or inability to handle kicks 
brought defeat to the Methodist school at the ; -hands of Reserve and 
Denison, both of whom were outplayed in all other features of the 
game. Ohio State earned a hard fought victory by the individual skill 
of Captain Wells. Six victories and three defeats, 254 points to oppo- 
nents' 31, was not a bad record, even if it was not fully satisfactory 
to Wesleyan adherents. # 

The remaining Conference colleges by their records deserve to be 
classed in a sort of second division. 

Wooster secured one victory, that over Kenyon by the decisive score 
of 21 — 0. Otherwise the season was one of much disappointment to 
followers and supporters of the Presbyterian college. The material, 
however, was light and inexperienced. Many good men failed to return 
to college and others were forced out of the game by parental 
objection. 

Kenyon ranks next to Wooster. The one ray of light in an otherwise 
dark season was the defeat of Denison. The remaining Conference 
games resulted in defeat. It is extremely difficult for a school of Ken- 
jon's size to maintain consistently strong teams. 

Miami played only one Conference game, Wittenburg, which they 
won, but are hardly entitled to higher ranking among Conference col- 
leges. 

Wittenburg played four Conference games, losing in every contest. 
A mid-season change of coaches handicapped the team and better 
results are looked for in the future. 




1, Zeigler; 2, Cooper; 3, Julie; 4, McCallum; 5, Todd; 6. YanWinkle; 7, 
Bowen, Asst. Mgr. ; 8, Toohey; 9, Sexton, Mgr. ; 10, Gargan, Coach; 11,. 
Smith, Capt. ; 12, Alverson; 13, Foster; 14, MeGovern; 15, Overton: 1C,. 
Robinson; 17, White. White, Photo. 

RUTGERS COLLEGE. 




1, Stinson, Asst. Mgr. ; 2, Myers; 3, Ford; 4, Pangburn; 5, Humphreys, Asst. 
Mgr.; 6, Linke: 7. Nash; 8, Seiler; 9, Traeger, Trainer; 10, Comstock; 11, 
Howe; 12, Dowd, Coach; 13, Harris, Capt. : 14. Bartlett. Mgr.; 15, White; 
16, MacMullen; 17, Nash; IS, Ratner; 19, DeCou; 20, Buttfield. 

STEVENS INSTITUTE, HOBOKEN, N. J. Manawal, Photo* 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 195 

Ohio University lost their one Conference game to Denison. The 
team won the unenviable distinction of not scoring a point the whole 
season, though not more than twelve points were scored against them 
by any of their Ohio opponents. 

Outside of the Ohio Conference there are some good teams well 
deserving of attention. These schools do not observe the freshmen 
rule, do not require a year of residence for migrants from other col- 
leges, and allow foui years of participation. With these advantages 
they furnish good opposition at times for some of the better Con- 
ference colleges. 

The University of Cincinnati, coached for the second time by Robert 
Burch, had a good season. Their only decisive defeat came at the 
hands of Ohio State, 23 — 0. They defeated the Denison team decis- 
ively and won from Miami and Wittenburg, this giving them three vic- 
tories over Ohio Conference colleges to the one defeat. Cincinnati lost 
games to Otterbein and to Central University of Kentucky. Since last 
fall, Cincinnati has been admitted to the Ohio Conference, and with 
their whole team back, Burch in charge again, a better schedule, as 
well as a new hustling, enthusiastic spirit in the University, they must 
he reckoned with seriously by the Conference. Cincinnati won six 
games and lost three. The Houk brothers in the back-field starred in a 
number of games, particularly against Denison. Bissmeyer was a lines- 
man of much ability. 

Buchtel College at Akron had an unusually strong team last year, 
under the coaching of Hagerty. They suffered only two defeats. 
Reserve, 7— O, and Notre Dame, 51 — 0. In good shape, because of 
early work, they defeated Oberlin the first game of the season by 
a field goal. On Thanksgiving day they decisively defeated Marietta, 
one of the best teams in Southern Ohio. Jackson was a powerful 
player, who would have made a place on any Ohio team. 

Otterbein, coached for the second time by Exendine, the old Carlisle 
end, had a team of about the usual strength for the school. On Octo- 
ber 1 they played a scoreless tie with Kenyon. Their most creditable 
performance was a victory over Cincinnati University at Cincinnati 
on November 5, by a score of 12 — 6. The foot ball spirit is strong at 
this United Brethren school and they put up a good, hard, consistent 
game. Full-back John and half-back Mattis are two men who showed 
particular class and went far to make the Otterbein team strong. 

Mount Union and Marietta had teams about on a par with Otter- 
bein and Buchtel. Mount Union lost a hard fought game to Buchtel 
by a close score of 5 — 3. They also gave Case School a hard battle. 
Case winning* 12 — 0. For the Alliance College, Whinnery and Gibson 
at the halves and Blythe and Carson at the ends repeatedly drew 
special mention for good work. 

Marietta gained some credit by a victory over West Virginia, 10 to 
6, and also defeated Miami, 17 — 0. Marietta was in turn decisively 
defeated by Buchtel at Akron in the closing game of the season. The 
Marietta team was not as strong as this college has been supporting 
for several seasons past. 




1, Brumm; 2, Dewey; 3, Griffin; 4, Brown; 5, H. Riley, Capt. ; 6, Sellnow; 
•7, Jososlasky; S, Felthousen Trainer; 9, Bronson; 10, Fairbairn; 11, O'Con- 
nell; 12, E. Riley; 13, Regnier, Coach; 14, Rice, Asst. Mgr.; 15, Vedder; 16, 
Congdon; 17, Sarvey; 18, McDermott; 19, Atkin; 20, Baker, Mgr. White, Photo. 
| > UNION UNIVERSITY, SCHENECTADY. N. Y. 




1, G. W. Spies, Mgr.; 2, Maloney; 3, Knhn; 4, Canfield; 5, Sweet; 6, 
O'Rourke; 7, Reed, Coach; 8, Spencer; 9, Kinney; 10, Welch; 11, Olds, Capt.; 
12, Timmeiman; 13, Stone; 14, Kennedy; 15, Griffin; 16, Williams; 17, Dodds, 
Asst. Mgr.; 18. Ward; 19. Quinn. 

ST. LAWRENCE UNIVERSITY. CANTON, N. Y. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 197 

All-Ohio Conference Eleven for 1910 

By L. W. St. John. 

First Team. Position. Second Team. 

Bowie, Reserve End Littick, Wesleyan 

Patton, Wesleyan Tackle Snider, Reserve 

Lind, Reserve Guard Curtis, Oberlin 

Abbott, Case Center McDaniels, Oberlin 

Hall, State Guard Olds, State 

Rosendale, Case Tackle Markley, State 

Powell. State End Axtell, Kenyon 

Nichols, Oberlin Quarter-back Rohy, Case 

Wells, State Half-back Shepherd, Wesleyan 

Twitchell, Case Half-back Rupp, Denison 

Thomssen, Wesleyan Full-back Heller, Case 

While one meets less difficulty in justly selecting a representative 
team from the Ohio Conference elevens than would be faced in choos- 
ing a real All-Ohio Team, the task is unusually difficult this year. 
In general the men were steady, but not brilliant. There were few 
stars, but a large number of men nearly equal in ability. This was 
so evident that the sporting editor of the Cleveland Leader refused 
to choose between the men in a number of positions. 

As usual, a number of men stand out well above the others and 
are particularly unanimous choices for places on the mythical team. 
Nichols, the Oberlin quarter ; Lind of Reserve, a guard and center ; 
Wells of Ohio State at half ; Hall a State guard ; and Powell at end 
and tackle are such men. In the other positions there is no clear 
superiority and many chances for mistake in the picking and choosing. 

Powell, a unanimous choice for tackle in 1909, was shifted by 
Coach Jones to end. He made good, but with less decisiveness than 
in his old position. Large and powerful, cool and deliberate, he 
crushed all plays sent in his direction ; though lacking speed and 
shiftiness, he was down the field well and was wonderfully hard to 
elude, pulling his man down with one hand as frequently as with a 
clean tackle. His reach enabled him to receive a forward pass over 
the head of the average player. By no means a finished end, he was 
effective both on offense and defense. Bowie of Reserve is the more 
usual type of end, fast and keen, possessing strength, judgment, and 
good tackling ability. He probably slightly betters Littick of Wesleyan 
and Axtell of Kenyon, because of his speed. 

At tackle Rosendale of Case had a pretty clear lead on his 
opponents, playing a uniformly strong game. As a mate for Rosen- 
dale, Patton of Wesleyan would make the strongest man, though 
frequently overlooked by the sporting writers. Weighing 195 pounds, 
6 feet 2 inches in height, seldom boxed and never smothered, fast 
with the ball and one of the best distance punters in Ohio, he was 
a better man than Snider of Reserve, who is too light for the position, 
though his energy and aggressive play go far to make up for his lack 
of weight. Hicks of Wesleyan showed superior to Snider in the 
Reserve-Wesleyan game, but poor health kept him from maintaining 
his early season form. Weighing 190 pounds, when in condition, and 
very fast for a big man, he should be a tower of strength this fall 




1, Fonde; 2, Massey; 3, Parman; 4, Stone, Coach; 5, Tompkins; 6, Cole; 7, 
Buckingham; 8, Penland; 9, Young; 10, Phipps, Mgr. ; 11. McGuire; 12, 
Branch; 13, Johnson, Capt. ; 14, Frances; 15, Elkins; 16, Latham. 

UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE. KNOXVILLE. TENN. 

McCoy, Photo. 




1, Covington; 2, Bowden; 3, Yorke; 4, Cox? 5, Slater; 6, Conklin; 7, Thomp- 
son; 8, Peacock; 9. Griffith; 10, Maddox; 11, MeLain; 12, Hatcher; 13, 
Brown. Mgr.; 14, McWhorter ; lo, Franklin, Capt.; 16, Cunningham, Coach; 
17, Woodruff; 18, Lucas. 

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA. ATHENS. GA 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 199 

when he will be playing his senior year at Wesleyan. Markley is 
another tackle who will be heard from in 1911. 

Lind of Reserve and Hall of State are the unanimous choices for 
the guards, their play being well up to the standard set by former 
All-Ohio guards. Lind, in particular, was a wonderful source of 
strength to Reserve, as he would have been to any team. He was a 
common selection for captain of the All-Ohio team. Curtis of Ober- 
lin, Little of Wesleyan, and Weiler of Case are other guards worthy 
of mention. 

In the center position Abbott of Case had a clean margin over 
other men in the position. In spite of his weight (well over 200 lbs.), 
he was fast and often down the field on punts, tackling the runner 
in many cases. McDaniels of Oberlin was steady and aggressive, 
though light. 

At quarter Nichols of Oberlin has no opposition. To his brilliancy 
as an individual player and a general, Oberlin owes much of the 
credit for her surprising record. In the Case game his fifty-yard run 
for "a touchdown after catching a punt helped his team to the 6 to 
victory. He takes a place well up with the star quarters of recent 
years. Roby of Case and Anderson of Denison were other good 
quarters. 

Back of the line Tnomssen of Wesleyan had the call over Heller of 
Case as a full-back. Unsurpassed in picking an opening he was able 
to gain as consistently as Heller, though possessing less of rushing 
power ; but as an interferer for his halves Thomssen has few equals. 
Fast enough for any backfield he leaves his feet and cuts down an 
opposing end in perfect shape. He is also a good defense man at 
supporting his line and spoiling forward passes. Wells at half was 
the strength of the State team on the offensive, combining in an 
unusual degree running, kicking and passing, in all three of which 
he was sure and expert. He certainly had a wonderful grasp of 
plays and worked with his interference in splendid style. 




1, Wykoff, Mgr. ; 2, Whinnery; 3, Osborne; 4, Dawson, Coach; 5, Carson; 6, 
Monier; 7, Eynon; 8, Woolf; 9, Gauchat; 10, Church; 11, Smith, Asst. Mgr.; 
12, Whinnery; 13, Monahan; 14, Ely the; 15, Gibson; 16, Stauffer; 17, Kerr; 
18, Newschitz; 19, Heslop; 20, Brown. 

MT. UNION COLLEGE, ALLIANCE, OHIO. 




1, Harmon, Coach; 2, Weil; 3, Harbison; 4, Lamb; 5, Ginsbigler; 6, Simons; 
7. Kiskaddon; 8, Ketler; 9, Wick, Mgr.; 10, Boone; 11, Acher; 12, Hutchin- 
son; 13, Marks, Capt. ; 14, Purvis. 

GROVE CITY (PA.) COLLEGE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 201 



Foot Ball in Ohio 

By Clinton P. Parker Akron, Ohio. 

The foot ball season of 1910 in the State of Ohio closed in a blaze 
of glory on Thanksgiving Day. This season has been the most suc- 
cessful one in the history of the gridiron game in this State, and 
several surprises were sprung by teams which were supposed to have 
absolutely no chance whatever with the more experienced teams. 

The new rules were given a thorough trying out, and in the main 
were found to be successful. Several changes, however, have been 
suggested by some of the college coaches, but on the whole the game 
was more open and better played than it has ever been before. 

It was a very noticeable fact that the injuries in the game were 
far less than in any previous year. Of those who were fatally injured 
as a result of foot ball, investigation has shown that a very large 
percentage of them were not in condition to play the game and should 
not have ben allowed to participate. The. responsibility for this rests 
very largely with the trainer, who should be the one man above all 
others to say when his men are in condition to play. In this par- 
ticular the judgment of the trainer should be taken in preference to 
that of the coach. 

The major part of the injuries received were about the head and 
legs. This condition being an acknowledged fact, it should be com- 
pulsory for all who participate in the games to wear head gears and 
have their ankles bandaged. This should be looked after by the 
trainer, as much of the success of the team rests with him. If the 
team can be kept in good physical condition it is one-half the battle 
and as important as good coaching. 

The results of foot ball this season have demonstrated that Ohio is 
the best foot ball State in the Union. There was in Ohio last season, 
eight teams that played as good foot ball and were as strong in all 
departments of the game as those teams which belong to the Western 
Conference. I do not wish, however, to go on record as saying that 
any one team was as strong as any one team in the Western Con- 
ference, but that the general average playing strength was as great. 

To my way of thinking, Minnesota was twenty points stronger than 
any Western Conference team, as the number of points she made in 
any Conference game was 24 to 0. The Ohio teams that compare 
favorably with the Western Conference teams in order of merit shown 
by their work are Buchtel, Oberlin, Case, State, Reserve, Denison, 
Wesleyan and Mt. Union. Briefly, my reasons for putting those teams 
in this order is as follows : Each team has played at least three 
games with Conference colleges, and since the remaining games on 
their schedule were with teams of about the same caliber, one has to 
he guided, to some extent, by the percentage of games won and lost. 

In some instances this would work an injustice, as for instance, 
Oberlin has a lower average than State or Case. This is because 
Oberlin has not played as many games as State or Case, but since 
she has defeated both, she will have to be placed above them in rank, 
regardless of percentage. Wesleyan has a higher percentage than 
Reserve, but since Reserve defeated Wesleyan, Reserve should be 
placed higher in the estimation of the foot ball public than Wesleyan. 
Had she kept up the good work she started, by defeating Buchtel in 
both teams opening game, she would have ranked higher. 

The only way one has to get a line on the comparative strength of 
Mt. Union and Wesleyan is to judge by their games with the same 




1, Williamson; 2, Cassidy; 3, Maxon, Coach; 4, Ducote; 5, Gremillion; G, 
Black; 7, F. Shimpf, Mascot; 8, Munoz; 9, T. Shimpf; 10, Pharr, Asst. 
Coach; 11, Ncedham; 12, Eiffel; 13. Bronssarcl; 11, Bauer; 15, Andrepont : 
16, Pardue, Capt.; 17, Becker; IS, Druhan. 

SPRING HILL COLLEGE. MOBILE. ALA. 




1, H. Coor. Mgr.; 2. Davis; :;. e. Allen; 4, Cleveland; 5, C. Rush, Capt.; 

6, Thompson; 7, Randall; 8, Register: 9, Bullock; 10. Jannan; 11. Moorer; 

12, Roberts; 33, J. Allen; 14, Smith; 15, MeCollnm; 16, Locke. Otts, Photo. 

SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY. GREENSBORO, ALA. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 203 

two Conference teams, Wooster and Kenyon. Wesleyan ran un a sum 
total of 40 to on those teams, while the best Mt. Union could do 
was 30 to 0. 

Denison defeated Wesleyan, but at that time she was going at 
her best, as the next Saturday's 5 to 5 game with State showed. She 
fell down terribly in that to game later with Wooster, and finally 
finished a dubious season by letting University of Cincinnati trim 
her, 28 to 12, after holding Reserve on the previous Saturday 6 to 3. 

I cannot help but call attention to Oberlin's great to game with 
Cornell, and Case and State's 3 to 3 games with Michigan. If it 
were only one tie game with an Ohio college we might claim an 
accident for Michigan, but I do not think any sane person would say 
that Yost's team had all the hard luck. 

This evidence will only bear me out in my contention, that when 
two teams from our State hold the so-called Western champions to a 
tie and there are three other teams in Ohio that have either defeated 
or tied those same two teams, then there can be but one verdict, and 
that is — there must be eight teams in Ohio fit to cope with any eight 
in the Western Conference or else they would not keep within 
striking distance of the leader, when such an extensive schedule is 
played. 

In writing this narrative I must not lose sight of the fine work 
which Buchtel College at Akron did on the gridiron during this 
season. Starting out with but thirteen men, Coach Haggerty found 
that his hands were practically tied for the want of material with 
which to build a first-class team. He,~ however, went on and made 
no complaint and developed one of the fastest and best teams in the 
State. In fact, the only team which was able to defeat Oberlin, the 
holders of the State championship for two years and which has been 
declared the Conference winner for another season, Buchtel lays just 
claim to the championship, but not being a member of the Conference 
she of course is counted out. 

The first game played by Buchtel College was with Reserve, and, 
although Reserve scored a victory over the boys from the "Rubber 
City," she had her hands full in getting the large side of the score. 
This opening game was the first scrimmage practice which Buchtel 
was able to get. Not having men sufficient to make two teams, Coach 
Haggerty was forced to divide his thirteen men and send one-half 
the line against the other half. This team therefore went against 
Reserve with nothing but signal practice and at that showed them 
how to play the game, as all the Cleveland papers stated at the time. 

In concluding this brief narrative of Ohio foot ball I shall take 
the liberty of selecting an All-Ohio team. I might say for this selec- 
tion, however, that some will disagree with my choice, but it is a 
safe bet that if it were possible to get this team together that they 
would be able to give any team in the State or the United States 
the hardest contest in which, they were ever engaged. 

First Team. Position. Second Team. 

Wilhoyt, Buchtel End Kagy, Reserve 

Costigan, Buchtel Tackle '.. Rosendale, Case 

Hall, State Guard Lind, Reserve 

Selby, Buchtel Center Abbott, Case 

Scott, Buchtel Guard Curtis, Oberlin 

Losrie, Reserve Tackle _ Conrad, Buchtel 

Grimm, Buchtel End Rafferty,, Reserve 

Nichols, Oberlin Quarter-back Weeks* Buchtel 

Rupp, Denison » Half-back Slater, Case 

Twitchell, Case Half-back Bird, Oberlin 

Jackson, Buchtel Full-back M. Bradshaw, Hiram 



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1, N. F. Thompson, Mgr.; 2, Sawyer; 3, Martin; 4, Harlow; 5, Lahr; 6, S. Peet, 
Trainer; 7, Randall; 8, H. S. Jones; 9, Forsyth; 10. MacDonald; 11, Mahan; 12, 
VanBrocklin;13, Rogers, Cap t.; 14, R. N. Jones; 15, York: 16, Brann; 17, Webster; 
18, Hay; 19, French. Sherman, Photo. 

PHILLIPS ACADEMY, ANDOVER, MASS. 




1, Dempsey; 2, McCabe; 3, Neal; 4, MacVeagh; 5, Diekeiman; 6, Brickley; 
7, Way; 8, Nelson; 9, Carter; 10. Mitchell; 11, Faulkner; 12, Smith. Mgr.; 
13, Cornell, Capt.; 14, Kirkpatrick; 15, O'Brien; 16, Ayer; 17, Mathews. 

PHILLIPS EXETER ACADEMY. EXETER, N. H. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 205 

Middle States Scholastic Foot Ball 

By George W. Orton, University of Pennsylvania. 

So very many scholastic teams played foot ball that it is impos- 
sible to get any very definite impressions as to the relative merits of 
many teams, so that it is better not to make too much of any relative 
scores. But there is little doubt that the two strongest teams in 
the section were from Mercersburg and Hill School. These two 
institutions do not play each other in foot ball, but from comparative 
scores and other information it appears that they were very evenly 
matched. This is shown by the respective scores of 6 to 3 and 6 to- 
made against Conway Hall. This would seem to indicate that Hill 
was a little stronger, but the defeat of the Princeton Freshmen, the 
11 to 12 score against the very strong Pennsylvania Freshmen eleven 
and the slaughter of Lawrenceville by 17 to 0, prove that Mercers- 
burg was also very strong. In the absence of a game between these 
two schools, it is best to rank them together as leading the scholastic 
teams of the Middle States. There are many claimants for the honor 
of next position, but Conway Hall and Lawrenceville seem to have 
the call. Blair Hall, Bethlehem Prep., St. Joseph's Prep., Haverford, 
Perkiomen Seminary, Pingry School, Swarthmore Prep., Chestnut 
Hill Academy and Penn Charter are but a few of the many schools- 
that played foot ball of a high class during the 1910 season. 

Central High of Philadelphia won the championship of the Phila- 
delphia High Schools, and was generally regarded as the strongest 
team in and about the city, with Central Manual next and St, 
Joseph's Prep, third and leading the preparatory schools. 

In Greater New York, Erasmus Hall showed the most consistent 
form, and, though defeated by the Brooklyn Boys' High School, they 
won the High School Championship of the city. 

In New Jersey, Atlantic City High again proved very strong, but 
in the absence of games with some of the high schools near New 
York, it is hardly right to rank them as the undisputed leaders of 
the State, though they would surely have put up a good game against 
any other high school eleven in New Jersey. 

Of the high school teams of Pennsylvania, it may merely be stated 
that Wilkesbarre again proved the best in their section ; that Harris- 
burg led their division, and that Williamsport proved superior to her 
rivals. Of these teams it would appear that the latter was the 
strongest. 




1, C. L. Johnson, Capt. ; 2, Prof. Cecil, Coach; 3, Grove, Asst. Coach; 4. 
Clarke; 5, Harrison, Asst. Coach; 6, Wilson; 7, Woodward; 8, Lewis; 9. 
Bowlus; 10, Clayton; 11, Ruhl; 12, Melville; 13, Winslow, Asst. Mgr. ; 14. 
Adams, Mgr.; 15, H. L. Johnson; 16, White; 17, Harris; 18, Welch; 19. 
Drake; 20, Hutchinson; 21, Moss. Buffham, Photo. 

ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE. ANNAPOLIS. MD. 




1, Beall; 2, Mossburg; 3, Leary; 4, Coulbourn, Mgr.; 5, Wright; 6, White; 
7, Adkins; 8, Dukes; 9, Bowers; 10, Collester, Coach; 11, Welch; 12, Greafe; 
13, Twigg, Capt.; 14, Dooley; 15, Birdsall; 16, Stultz; 17, Sprague. 
WESTERN MARYLAND COLLEGE. WESTMINSTER. MD. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 207 



Scholastic Foot Ball of Greater Boston 

By John J. Hallahan, Boston, Mass. 

A review of the school foot ball season of 1910 showed that the 
revision of the rules governing the sport, which many thought would 
"be too intricate for the schoolboys of Greater Boston and in fact of 
all New England, were not so difficult to understand. On the whole 
it can be said that the new rules or the changes were a big success. 
Teams were slow at first in grasping them, but after the first two 
or three weeks there was very little with which the coaches and 
players were not acquainted. The knowledge possessed by the 
players with competent officials acting in the most important games, 
gave great satisfaction, so much so that it was the general wish 
that little if anything in the way of changes be made in the code. 

No serious accidents were reported,- showing that the rules accom- 
plished its greatest aim. Of course, there were probably as many 
minor injuries as ever, but in the Greater Boston district the injuries 
were very slight, keeping players out of but a very few games. In 
the Boston high schools the requirement of the department of hygiene 
making it necessary for every candidate to engage in calisthenics and 
other preparatory work for the purpose of getting in the best physical 
condition, had wonderful effect. Boston high schools were not 
allowed to engage in competition until October 1, which was one 
week later than the majority of schools, and because of the splendid 
physical condition of the players the injury list was only a trivial one. 

Competition between the schools was just as keen as ever. There 
was very little new play uncovered, but there was a mastery in the 
fundamentals of the game that was far above the standard of 
previous years. This attribute was almost general, but it was usually 
the elevens better drilled in the rudiments that were conspicuous by 
victories. 

No school ever showed up stronger in general all-around perfection 
than did Andover. Its win over Exeter for the sixth consecutive 
year was that of an eleven that had every action of a machine and 
which was never at a loss to know what to do. It was its perfect 
mastery in the fundamentals that gave it the honor of being one of 
the best teams which! has ever represented Andover. Groton's victory 
over St. Mark's was also the result of perfection of fundamentals. 
Fumbling, the worst of a foot ball eleven, was St. Mark's downfall. 
There was a big development in goal-kicking over other years. Goals 
from placement and by drop-kicks were very common. Several players 
proved remarkable in their efforts to aid their teams to victory by 
ability to gauge the uprights. The best individual record in the 
number of goals kicked in one game was made by Captain' Malcolm 
Logan of Boston Latin School, who, by three successful drop-kicks 
from good distances, scored a win in the most important game of 
the year with English High, 9 to 0. The best drop-kick from distance 
was made by Edward Handy of Milton Academy, who kicked a goal 
from an angle of 42 yards away from the goal posts in the game 
with Groton School. There were several other clever performers, but 
both Logan and Handy showed themselves to be the cleverest. 

Forward passes were also more prominent than before. Many 
teams showed more deception in their efforts to advance the ball by 
the toss. Very few times were the passes too long, and few penal- 
ties were meted out because of interference with the catcfier of the 









, 5 



1, Markel; 2, Arnold; 3, Long; 4, Benson; 5, Wallace; 6, McAlpin; 7, Castle; 
8, Goss; 9, Brooks; 10, Shear; 11, Baker; 12, Douherty; 13, Potter. 
HILL SCHOOL. POTTSTOWN. PA. 




1, Caldwell; 2, McKenzie; 3, E. Carter; 4, Trask; 5, Orvis; 6, Holden, Mgr.; 

7. Heyinger; 8, Day; 9, Baker; 10, H. Carter; 11, Doyle; 12, Rawleigh; 13, 

Wiedeman; 14, A. Carter, Capt.; 15, Aikens; 16, Smith. McManus, Photo. 

LAWRENCEYILLE (N. J.) SCHOOL. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 209 

pass. There was also very little penalizing for interference on kicks 
within the 20-yard zone, which was generally expected would be the 
thorn in the side of the youngsters. Safeties were numerous in the 
early part of the season, which were due to the ignorance of officials. 
The latter and the coaches all agree, however, that the season was 
productive of more hard, clean playing than ever before. There were 
very few disqualifications and only a few suspensions of players 
because of unsportsmanlike conduct recorded. 

There was no question as to which school was entitled to the 
championship. At the close of the 1909 season there were several 
schools which believed their claims to championship honors were the 
only just ones, but in 1910, Maiden High School's record far out- 
classed that of any other team. Maiden High was an aggregation 
moulded together from eleven of the finest type of youngsters that 
could be found, and at the close of the season had won 14 games, 
an unusual record, without a defeat, totaling 393 points against 11 
points for its opponents. Rindge Manual Training School of Cam- 
bridge was the only school which anywhere approached Maiden's 
record, but the best that its record of eight games can give it is 
second place. No defeats were suffered by Rindge, but it figured in 
tie games. Outside of Maiden High and Rindge Manual Training 
Schools, the ranking of the teams is an almost impossible task. 

The battling for the championships of the various leagues was as 
interesting as ever. Maiden High's record entitles it to the cham- 
pionship of the Greater Boston district if not of New England. The 
Interscholastic Athletic League title was won by Rindge Manual 
Training School of Cambridge ; the Suburban Interscholastic League, 
by Maiden High School ; Boston High Schools, Boston Latin School ; 
Boston High School League, Mechanic Arts High School ; Preparatory 
League, Brookline High School : Boston Private Schools, Noble and 
Greenough School ; Cambridge City -League, Rindge Manual Training 
School; Essex County League, Danvers High School; South Shore 
District, Plymouth High School ; Central Massachusetts District, 
Natick High and Leominstet High Schools; Western Massachusetts 
District, Springfield High/ School^ Plymouth County District, Brock- 
ton High School ; Rhode Island Interscholastic League, Providence 
Technical High School. 

The interest brought big crowds out, and as annual stunts, the 
most important contests were played on Thanksgiving Day. Boston 
Latin trimphed over English High for the first time since 1903 ; 
Rindge Manual Training School defeated Somerville High, 6 to 3, for 
the first time in eight years ; Brookline High conquered Waltham 
High, 6 to ; Beverly High repeated its success of the year before 
by winning from Salem High, 6 to ; Mechanic Arts High surprised 
Dorchester High by winning, 11 to ; and Maiden High swamped 
Medford High, 35 to 0. Lawrence High and Haverhill High had a 
dispute, Lawrence High withdrawing its team from the field. It was 
estimated that over 100,000 persons saw schoolboys play on Thanks- 
giving Day. 

After the holiday, Rindge Manual Training School tried hard to 
meet Maiden High, but the latter did not care to play. Instead, 
Maiden High played the Providence Technical High of Providence, 
R. I. The Maiden High team showed the effects of its long schedule, 
but displayed a decided superiority over the Providence team, winning 
by 29 to 6. 

No team showed such united effort as Andover. The eleven dis- 
played an all-around knowledge of the game that was wonderful. The 
annual game with Exeter was a repetition of previous years. Exeter 
absolutely forgot all it knew when it went on the field, while the 
Andover team was perfect. The score, 21 to 0, shows how outclassed 



,,.v 1-5 MS W 



1, P. Jones, Asst. Coach; 2, Holcombe; 3, Botsai; 4, Hodge; 5, Harsh; 6, 
Wilkinson; 7, H. Stirling, Mgr. ; 8. Greene; 9, Strange; 10, G. N. Messer, 
Coach; 11, Zielminski; 12, Robinson; 13, Searight; 14, T. Wingo, Capt. ; 15, 
Stoekmar; 16, Toe; 17, McLaney; 18, Morton; 19, Goldstein; 20, Neville; 21, 
Wood; 22, Barker. BIRMINGHAM (ALA.) HIGH SCHOOL. 




l, Normand; 2, Coley, Capt; 3, W. Vincent; 4, Bourque; 5, McNaspy, Coach; 

6, Hebert; 7, Himel; 8, Bertrand; 9, Miller; 10, Achee; 11, J. Vincent; 12, 

Guidroz; 13, Aycock; 14, Moore; 15, Bercegeay. Carter, Photo. 

SOUTHWESTERN LOUISIANA INDUSTRIAL INSTITUTE, 

LAFAYETTE, LA. 






1 Forester; 2, Cornelius; 3, Beck; 4, Hoff; 5. Rennick; 6, Greenwood; 7, 

Rike Coach; 8, Schoolfield; 9, Clark; 10, Allin, Capt.; 11, Spencer; 12, 

Lockwood; 13. Killinsworth. Stokes, Photo. 

CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL. CHATTANOOGA. TENN. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 211 

Exeter was. In addition to being a unit, Andover had one of the 
greatest players that ever wore its colors in Edward Mahan. He- 
could carry the ball w^ell, punt a longer distance and with an accu- 
racy that was expert ; tackle like a fiend and drop-kick like an artist. 
Surrounding him, Andover had an exceptionally well-coached team, 
which was a tribute to Coach Lillard, who the year before coached' 
the Dartmouth eleven. Exeter was thought to have a fine team 
before the game, but the best coterie of coaches available failed, as 
did the, late Jim Hogan of Yale and Johnny Glaze of Dartmouth,, 
before them. 

Groton returned to the winning side of its ledger by defeating St. 
Mark's. Groton won because its players could handle the ball, a 
department of the game that St. Mark's, which had been sucessful 
in 1909 for the first time in ten years, failed to do. Groton's players 
tackled harder and had all the confidence in the world, and as a 
result its victory, 11 to 0, was justly earned, the bringing about of 
each score being largely instrumental, however, to fumbles made by 
St. Mark's backfield players when under the shadow of their own goal. 

The season on the whole could be considered even more successful' 
than that of 1909. Many clever players were developed, but the 
following combination was considered to be the best players in their- 
respective positions : 

Lucas (Maiden High) and Manning" (Quincy High), ends. 

H. Benoit (Maiden High) and Anderson (Maiden High) , tackles. 

W. Swart (Rindge Manual Training) and Pendergast (Boston Latin), guards^. 

Brawley (Medford High), center. 

Logan (Boston LatinX quarter-back. 

R. Garland (Somerville High) and Westcott (Maiden High), half-backs^ 

Fraser (Dorchester High), full-back. 




i, Snyder, Asst. Mgr. ; 2, Lyter, Mgr. ; 3, Berrien, Asst. Mgr. ; 4, Shipp, 
Coach; 5, Yoder; 6, Strite; 7, B. Gangler; 8, Loeser; 9, Fry; 10, Gibbs, 
Coach; 11, Rogers; 12, Denny; 13, R. Gangler; 14, DeVine; 15, Kirkpatrick; 
16, P. Douglass; 17, Richards; 18, Clark; 19, E.Richards, Capt. ; 20, Hoffman; 
21, Toomey; 22, Nye. HARRISBURG (PA.) HIGH SCHOOL. 



■ 



1, C. Kreinis; 2, Miller; 3. Keck; 4, Prof. H. M. B. Lehn, Mgr.; 5, Bortz; 
0, C. Blair; 7, Downes; 8, E. Kremis; 9, McClean; 10, H. Snyder, Capt.- 11, 
V. Blair; 12, Doyle; 13, Haws; 14, Busch; 15, Lynch. 
GREENVILLE (PA.) TEAM. 






I, Prof. Wilson, i'rin. ; 2, Kjeiiander, Phys. Dir. ; 6, Shannon, Mgr.; 4, Tate; 
5, Hart; 6, Adams; 7, Eilenberger; 8, Talmadge; 9, Dickerson; 10, Gibbs; 

II, Hiler; 12, Thorne; 13, Shelley, Capt.; 14, Booth; 15, Tierney; 16, Rowley, 

M1DDLETOWN (N. Y.) HIGH SCHOOL. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 213 



Foot Ball by the Teams of the U. S. S. 
Idaho and U. S. S. Vermont 

From the London Sporting Life, Friday, November 25, 1910. 

Yesterday was Thanksgiving Day in the U. S. A., and it is always 
associated with big foot ball matches and other special features 
which so powerfully appeal to our trans-Atlantic cousins. The 
big colony of Americans in London were catered for yesterday in 
a different manner from that in previous years, as an opportunity 
was afforded them of witnessing foot ball at the Crystal Palace 
under the rules of their own code. This was made possible owing 
to the visit of the Third Division of the American Fleet to English 
waters, the Idaho and Vermont ships providing the opposing sides. 

Unfortunately, the turf was not in a condition to enable the players 
to show their pace, as it was terribly greasy, but they largely tri- 
umphed over this difficulty, and maintained their footing in fine 
style, except when downed by the opposing forces. There is not any- 
thing of a half-hearted nature about American tackling. It is easy 
to understand, watching the game as played yesterday, where admit- 
tedly fouls and anything approaching brutal vigor were not per- 
mitted, that» serious accidents are bound to happen as a result of 
the attempt to carry into practice the ideas which govern the actions 
of a crack side. It was speedily demonstrated that there is no 
room for anything approaching selfishness in the American game, 
and that discipline, in the shape of implicit obedience to the orders 
of the captain, is the keynote of the play. The captain is like the 
chess player with a certain number of pieces, and they are all under 
his control and do what is allotted to them in a manner decided 
upon as the exigencies of the game demanded. 

There is not anything stereotyped or formal about the work in the 
field. Prior to the commencement the players were all given their 
numbers, as usual, and every formation was in obedience to the 
quarter-back, who, shouting out a succession of numbers, thereby indi- 
cated the plan to be adopted to overcome the opposition. The defend- 
ing side, of course, had no knowledge of what these signals meant. 
They heard the numbers, as could the onlookers, but as the numbers 
varied, so did the attack following the formation, and those who were 
for the time being on the defense had to use their wits to break up 
the combinations which were from time to time called into being. 

It was all very strange to followers of the Rugby or Associa- 
tion code, who attended to the number of about 5,000 to witness the 
match. To the great majority what went on was not understood, 
but they were not allowed to remain long in doubt when a score 
had accrued to the Idaho team. The cheers, frantic yells, beating 
of drums, and the loud blasts on brass instruments showed the 
intense excitement under which the American sailors, who were 
present in large force, were laboring. When an advantage was 
gained by either side, their respective partisans lashed themselves 
into a fine frenzy. There was not anything restrained about their 
jubilations. They had the voice of a stentor, and they used it to 
emit ear-splitting yells and battle cries, accompanying these with 
veritable dances of delight. There was the unadulterated fervor of 
the enthusiast translated into action, and all the time the phleg- 




1, Allen; 2, Prof. Smith; 3, MeGaughy, Coach; 4, Anderson. Coach; 5, Lile; 
6, Burns; 7, Rice; 8, Thompson; 9, Turnbough; 10, Hamilton; 11, Fowler; 
12, H. McClay; 13, McClanahan, Capt. ; 14, Manship; 15, Harjman; 16, P. 
McClay; 17. Love; 18, Carter. 

CASTLE HEIGHTS SCHOOL, LEBANON. TENN. 




1, Harris; 2, Fishburne, Asst. Coach; 3, Maloney; 4, Kincaid; 5, Smith; 6, 
Rothrock, Coach; 7, Johnstone; 8, Soaper; 9, Lewis; 10, Leavitt; 11, Swan; 
12, Thompson; 13, Pittman; 14, Brown, Capt.; 15, Woodson; 16, Sheltou. 
TENNESSEE MILITARY INSTITUTE, SWEETWATER. TENN. 




I, Harris, Phys. Dir. ; 2, McClure; 3, Dowdy; 4, Barnes; 5, Thomason; 6, 
Lister; 7, Hines, Mgr.; 8, Prof. J. B. Hobdy, Pres, ; 9. Parker; 10, Allen; 

II, Selman; 12, Porter; 13, Curry; 14, M. Campbell; 15, T. Cardwell; 18, 
Prickett; 17, S. Cardwell, Capt.; 18, W. Campbell; 19, Clemons. 

SEVENTH DISTRICT AGRICULTURAL SCHOOL, ALBERTTILLE, 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 215 

matic Britishers who were looking on with tolerant curiosity wondered 
what it was all about. 

It is almost impossible to give an adequate pen description of 
the game that would be intelligible to those who have never seen it. 
Imagine a field 110 yards long by 53 yards 1 foot wide. Rugby 
goal-posts are at each end, and there is a white line across the whole 
length of the playing field every five yards, this being necessary to 
enable the referee to accurately judge the distance in the case of 
"downs," the American substitute for our Rugby scrums. A side 
must make at least ten yards' ground in three downs, otherwise they 
lose possession of the ball, and are consequently unable to initiate 
their formation movements, so that there is always a desperate strug- 
gle on the part of the side in possession to cover the stipulated dis- 
tance in three "downs." It is from these "downs" that most of 
the scoring movements originate, and when the numbers are called 
out indicating the formation to be adopted, every player on the 
side is on the alert to assist in giving effect to the orders that have 
been issued. 

There are eleven players on each side, but they do not form up 
in any way resembling the Association or Rugby team. As a matter 
of fact each side has two formations, one for attack and one for 
defense, and they are totally dissimilar. There is not anything 
in common between the American game and Association, but there 
are certain points of resemblance between it and Rugby. The ball is 
egg-shaped, and it is carried as well as kicked. The scoring is simple. 
A touchdown, similar to the Rugby try, counts five points, but if 
this be converted into a goal from the place-kick, only one point is 
added, so that not much importance is given from a scoring point 
of view to a goal being obtained from a touchdown. A field goal, 
scored under similar conditions to those of a Rugby goal, counts three 
points, and the only other method of scoring is from the safety 
tactics of the defending side, who, if they resort to what is equiva- 
lent to the touchdown in Rugby, concede two points to their oppo- 
nents, the f ramers of the American code taking the view that it is 
unfair to rob the attacking side of all the advantage it has secured 
by the simple device of "safety" by the defenders. 

There are other features in the American game which are absent 
from those played under both codes in this country. On each side of 
the ground there are two officials, each with a pole, and the poles are 
connected by a chain ten yards long. When the referee orders a 
"down," one pole is placed on the touch-line exactly opposite the 
spot, while the other is planted the full limit of ten yards away in 
the direction of the defenders' goal. These officials, having taken 
up their positions, have to remain there until signalled to by the 
referee, who is able by their means to accurately judge whether the 
required distance in three "downs" has been covered by the attack- 
ing side. 

Another feature of the game is the presence of a large number of 
reserves, who take the place as occasion may arise of the men who 
leave the field, either through, injuries or because ordered to do so 
by the referee for misconduct. The game should always be played 
with a full team on the field, because all the formations are based 
on ttie idea that every man must do something towards ensuring 
its success. During the whole of the game, too, attendants promenade 
just, clear of the side touch-lines with pails of water and sponges, 
and when any of the players have been grovelling in the mud — this 
is a frequent occurrence — they embrace the first opportunity of dash- 
ing to the side for a sponge down, and then they rush to another 
official who carries a pail of coarse sand, and they rub their hands 
with this so as to assist them to get a more secure grip when tack- 
ling an opponent. 



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1, Munk; 2, Liardy; 3, Addis; 4, L. DeWitt; 5, Bishop; 6, Herd; 7, Staf- 
ford; 8, Lynn; 9, Smith, Coach; 10, McDiffet; 11, Marshall; 12, L. Buttermore; 
13, Scott, Capt. ; 14, E. DeWitt; 15, Hooper, Mgr. ; 16, McCormick; 17, A. 
Buttermore; 18, Moser. 

CONNELLSYILLE (PA.) HIGH SCHOOL 



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1, Bitter; 2, M. Jacobs; 3, Williams; 4, Shalter, Coach; 5, Mosser; o, 
Erdman; 7, Peiflev; 8, Krause; 9, Boberts, Mgr.; 10, Caravedo; 11, Ennis; 
12, Portugal; 13, Sermonlin; 14, Glowa; 15, Kline; 16, Beinsmith, Capt.; 17, 
Graby; 18. G. Jacobs. Lindenmuth, Photo 

ALLENTOWN (PA.) PBEPABATOBY SCHOOL. 




1, W. Smith, Mgr.; 2, Douglass; 3, Hosack; 4, Smith; 5, Bheam; 6, Hudson; 
7, McCreigh; 8, Shields; 9, Kirberger, Coach; 10, McWilliams; 11, Little; 
12, McCarter: 13, Buftner, Capt.; 14, Castaneda; 15, Blair; 16, Crane; 17, 
Cannon. INDIANA (PA.) NOBMAL SCHOOL. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 217 

The players in yesterday's teams were dressed in the elaborate 
garb which English people know, through the medium of the pictorial 
press, is worn in the American game. The padded clothes, ear-pieces, 
shoulder-pads, nose-guards, etc., etc., were all worn, and they were 
needed, because the charging was often in the nature of a couple of 
battering rams coming into contact. The attacking side had its plan 
for scoring a touchdown, and the defenders sought to upset it. 
One player was in possession of the ball, and the business of his 
colleagues was to keep all opponents at bay, and they did this, or 
attempted to do so, by adopting various formations. There would 
be an almost solid body sweeping down the field, with the man with 
the ball closely guarded ; but the defense was equal to the demands 
made upon it. They presented themselves in a more or less solid 
block of humanity, there was a crash of opposing forces, a dozen 
men were on the ground, the referee's whistle went, and then, the 
rivals sorted themselves out. It was virile, it was stimulating to 
those who understood the niceties of the game and could appre- 
ciate them, but the game did not appeal to Britishers, and is not 
likely to do so. The Americans hold the view that it is the finest 
in the world, and that merely illustrates the fact that tastes 
differ. 

It only remains to be added that the Idaho team were easily the 
better side, and were almost constantly attacking. Only three quarters 
of fifteen minutes each were played, instead of four quarters, owing 
to the failing light, and the Idaho team won by 19 points (1 field 
goal, 1 goal from a touchdown, and 2 touchdowns) to 0. At the close 
a cup was presented, to the winning team on behalf of the "Daily 
Mirror," who were responsible for The organization of the game. 



U. S. S, Connecticut Defeats U. S. SL 
Michigan 

About 3,000 spectators, including numerous oflScers and men cf 
the American Navy, witnessed a keen game on the Recreation Ground 
at Weymouth vesterday between the United States flagship Connecti- 
cut and the Michigan. Rear-Admiral Schroeder and the Mayor and 
Mayoress of Weymouth were among those who watched the game. 

The Michigan men made the first advances and gave evidences of 
being the faster set, and early in the first quarter, from a pass by 
Meinkie, Waldon crossed on the right and touched down, but the score 
was disallowed. Connecticut worked slowly to the other end, where 
Montgomery scored a touchdown, but missed with the goal-kick. In 
the second quarter Connecticut had much the better of the game, 
and Brown ran across and touched down. Montgomery added the 
extra point with a fine goal kick. In the third quarter play was 
fairly even, but though in the last Michigan showed improved form 
they failed to reduce the flagship's lead. Result : Connecticut, 5 
points ; Michigan, 0. Two players were injured and had to leave 
the field. 

Connecticut — Montgomery, Conrader, Blank, Zwingle, Rausch, Low- 
gan, Narrance, Buck, Williams, Brown, and Richardson. 

Michigan — Gardiner, Tazaelaer, Austin, Keegan, Mathisen, Cooper, 
Smith, Fritts, Meinkie, Teague, and Waldon. 




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SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 219 



College Notes 



Alma (Mich) College. — Alma won the State M. I. A. A. title by defeating 
the Olivet team 14 to 3. 

Allegheny College, Meadville, Pa. — Allegheny was the winner of the 
Western Pennsylvania and West Virginia Intercollegiate League championship 
•of 1910, Geneva being the winner in 1909. Last season was the best; ia 
Allegheny's history, and with one of the lightest teams of the league. 
Allegheny attracted attention through a unique formation and peculiar pass 
by the center, the best play of Coach Stewart, in which the center passed 
ifrom his side and was able to get into the interference, no quarter-back 
being used, and giving great opportunity for good interference for end 
running. The play was approved by the Rules Committee as legal. 

.Amherst College. — The foot ball season of 1910 was a very satisfactory 
•one from an Amherst standpoint. The fine showing made against Harvard 
was unexpected and we were the first team to really threaten her goal, for 
we had the ball on her 3-yard line. At Hanover, N. H., the boys showed 
their foot ball knowledge and skill and scored on Dartmouth. The final game 
of the year, that with Williams, was the greatest success of the season, for 
we humbled them to the tune of 9 — 0. A great share of the work done by 
the team is due to Coach H. H. Hobbs of Yale. 

Antioch College, Yellow Springs, Ohio. — Manager Coppess states: "We had 
very hard luck in 1910. Our team was very light in weight and was pitted 
against the larger colleges of the State. However, we will not have to work 
with new material alone t^is coming season." 

' Bates College, Lewiston, Me. — Bates College was represented last year by 
a successful team, which won five games, tied three and lost one. The team 
•did not really develop until the Maine State championship season began. The 
result of this series was a victory over Maine and a tie score with Bowdoin. 
Bates did not play Colby last year, so the championship could not be defi- 
nitely settled on any team, although Bowdoin and Bates had the better 
records. The team, as a whole, was as well drilled and versatile as any 
Bates has had, and the season's work was gratifying to the team itself, 
coaches and whole student body. 

Baylor University, Waco, Tex. — Baylor had an undefeated team, excepting 
a game forfeited when score was 6 and 6. Three All-State men were on the 
team, and the team scored more points than any other in the State. Their 
goal line was only crossed twice. 

Bethany College, Bethany, W. Va. — The season of 1910 was the banner 
year for Bethany. The team lost but two games during the season and 
succeeded in defeating their old rival, Washington and Jefferson, 3 to 0. The 
team was very light, but what they lacked in weight they made up in speed. 
Bethany on a dry field was held by West Virginia University to an to O 
score, although Bethany showed her superiority at all stages of the game. 
Later, when the two teams met in Wheeling, on a muddy and slippery field, 
West Virginia's weight told, and Bethany was defeated, 8 to 0, losing, the 
championship of the State. Full-back Bishop shone particularly. He kicked 
a drop-kick at an angle from the 50-yard line, defeating Washington and 
Jefferson 3 — 0. He averaged 43 yards on punts. The average weight of the 
team was 152 pounds. 

Brown University, Providence, E. I. — Manager George S. Burgess writes: 
"Starting the season late and with material which seemed below the average 
in foot ball ability, Brown did not find herself until the third period of the 
Harvard. Up to the time of the Penn game the team held its own, but 
found in the Quakers rivals too strong for an ordinary team. The Penn 
game did, however, serve to show the coaches Brown's weakness, and from 
then on the improvement was steady. Finally, as the scores will show, from 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 221 

the middle of the Harvard game to the end of the season, Brown had the 
best foot ball team in her history and, to my mind and the minds of many 
others, the best team in the country last fall. The success of the team was 
due not wholly or primarily to the wonderful playing Jbf such men ag 
Sprackling, McKay, Smith and Sisson, but to the systematic team work and 
co-operation of all the men." 

Case School of Applied Science, Cleveland, Ohio. — It is said that Case 
actually outplayed Michigan and missed two other field goals by narrow 
margins, while Michigan had only the one opportunity to score. Case lost 
only to Oberlin by a touchdown, which was allowed by referee, although the 
runner clearly stepped off the side-lines, and was therefore not tackled by 
Case ends and backs, who had an opportunity. 

Christian Brothers' College, Memphis, Tenn. — The team was light but fast 
and well trained. They were well drilled in all the fine points of the game. 
Depending on speed and science, they won all their games through these 
means. The only defeat was by a heavy university team that held Sewanee 
to six points. Forward passes and open formation were the team's chief 
assets. 

Citadel Military College, Charleston, S. C. — The team started the season in 
good form, but was handicapped before the Clemson game by losing six 
valuable men who were expelled from college. Of course, it took quite a 
time to get a new team running smoothly, and Citadel lost to both Charles- 
ton and Mercer, but wound up the season gloriously, defeating Carolina for 
the first time since the two colleges have been playing each other. 

Colby College, Waterville, Me. — Colby started out with a good showing, 
and at no time in the history of the college was) the outlook for foot ball 
so bright and prosperous, but at the first of the schedule the team met with 
a little hard luck, due to no fact except that it was unfortunate. Better 
prospects are in sight for 1911 and the followers of the game at Colby are 
looking forward to a close and exciting struggle. 

Colgate "University, Hamilton, N. Y. — With a loss of nine 'varsity men in 
June, Colgate began the season with but three 'varsity men and a large 
g-quad out of which to hammer a team. Laurence H. Bankart, Dartmouth 
1910, deserves great credit for his excellent work. Though the Trinity game 
was a disappointment, with Syracuse as the objective point in the schedule, 
the team slowly became whipped into shape. On November 12 the climax 
was happily passed in the third successive victory over Syracuse. 

Colorado Agricultural College, Fort Collins, Col. — The team played oppo- 
nents much stronger in every way, but played the new rules better than any 
other team in that section and were consistent throughout the season. Lack 
of material was a great drawback, but the future outlook is bright. 

College of Charleston, Charleston, S. C. — With a light, snappy team, the 
College of Charleston won second place in the State foot ball standing. The 
decisive defeat of Citadel was the luminous spot in a fairly successful 
season. N. B. ("Red") Edgerton of Davidson proved hi& worth as one of 
the best coaches ever seen in that section of the South. 

Dakota "Wesleyan University, Mitchell, S. D.— D. W. U. was badly handi- 
capped for back-field material throughout the season of 1910, but the line 
was the heaviest and strongest in the State and w r as nevetf broken throughout 
the season. 

Davidson (N. C.) College. — The work of Kluttz, Booe and Graham were 
features in every game, all three being very fast men. Pharr, a back-field 
man, also did excellent work. The line men w r ere strong men. McQueen at 
center was extra good, while Cashion was 1 a tower of strength. Ervin, a 
back-field man, is a dandy at his position, and is considered one of the best 
defensive men in this section. The team as a whole was very light, but fast. 

DePauw University, Greencastle, Ind. — In holding the strong Indiana Uni- 
versity team to a 12 to score, DePauw demonstrated her ability as one of 
the be?* teams in the State, and w T ith the defeat of Earlham in the final 
game of the season, the secondary championship of Indiana was awarded 
DePauw. The defeat by Butler was from the foot of "Cully" Thomas, 
Indiana's best kicker, who booted one from the 45-yard line. 




1, Coxe, Coach; z, B. fc>. Xittany, Mgr.; 3, Weils, Asst. Mgr. ; 4, DuBois; 5, 
Stegmaier; 6, Brodhead; 7, Meixell; 8, Richards; 9, Dick; 10, Wendling; 11, 
Hill, Capt.: 12, Coxe; 13, Pauxtis; 14, Teske; 15, Frantz; 16, Diamond; 17, 
Cross; 18, Miller. WYOMING SEMINARY. KINGSTON. PA. 




1, Garrett; 2, Thompson; 3, Watkins; 4, Woodward; 5. Bew; 6. Edgar; 7, 
Helfrick; 8, MacArthur, Coach; 9, Endicott; 10, Backus; 11, Fairhurst; 12, 
Newton; 13, Paddock, Capt.; 14, Marshall; 15, Beyer; 16, Miller; 17, 
Narcross; 18, Swaffield, Mgr. 

PEDDIE INSTITUTE, HIGHTSTOW T N. N. J. 




1, Boyce; 2, 'Yost; 3, Nolte, Mgr.; 4, Gilbert; 5, Griniley; 6, Girton; 7, 

Meredith; 8, Reisner, Capt.; 9, Sherlock; 10, Ferrich; 11, Smith; 12, Barrett; 

13, Zearfoss; 14, Ellis. Gutekunst, Photo. 

WILLIAMSON SCHOOL. PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



"SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 223 

Dickinson Collegre, Carlisle, Pa. — The past season was an exceedingly 
disastrous one for Dickinson. The great fault was the lack of experienced 
men. Green men had to be used, and there was) much shifting of positions. 
At times the team played good ball, but the best plays were due to indi- 
vidual work and not team work. Captain Felton was probably the strongest 
man on the team. The great need of the team was concerted action or 
team work. 

Doane College, Crete, Neb. — The Doane team of 1910 was handicapped at 
the beginning of the season by the scarcity of veteran material. The whole 
season was one of steady improvement. A peculiar state of affairs left the 
State collegiate championship rather uncertain. Hastings College cancelled 
her early season game with Doane, so the schools did not meet. Wesleyan 
•defeated Grand Island College 16 — 0, while Hastings played the same team 
•0—0. In view of this fact, because Doane defeated Wesleyan 8 — 6, Doane 
•supporters feel that they are justified in claiming the State championship. 

Earlham College, Richmond, Ind. — Captain Bruner, full-back, and Hugh- 
l)anks, guard, were the only veterans on the team and were the stars, each 
landing on the All-State in several selections. With only these two old 
players on the team, the development was 1 doubly hard from so much raw 
material. 

Pairmount College, Wichita, Kan. — Starting the season with but six 
veterans, Fairmount developed a team which, though light in weight, by its 
jnastery of the forward pass and open style of play, was able to win from 
teams its superior in weight and playing the old style game. The team won 
•all its home games and was outplayed in but one contest, that with the Agri- 
cultural College. Its other defeat was by an inferior team and due to a com- 
bination of luck and decidedly adverse official ruling. The team was th** 
third best in the State, surpassed only by the University and Agricultural 
College, 

Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, Pa. — The team's work was con- 
sistent throughout the season, but an injury to Richards, full-back, which 
kept him out of the game for the entire season, had an adverse effect until 
new material was developed. Captain Bridenbaugh and Manager Sohl 
attribute the club's reaction in the early part of the season to the change 
naturally produced by the switch from the Penn system of coaching to that 
of the Indians,, a result that will inevitably occur until a team accustoms 
itself to the different tactics employed. Most games were played against 
teams of heavier weight. 

Gallaudet College, "Washington, D. C. — This team, from the College for 
Deaf Mutes, long famed for light, fast teams, meets some of the best 
colleges in the East, and has long held a reputation for sportsmanlike play. 
Handicapped early in the 1910 season by the loss of quarter-back Moore and 
full-back Birck, the team had an off year in games won, but put up a 
stauncb fight. Closing the schedule was the engagement with the Norfolk 
Blues, an organization of college stars, coached by Branch Johnson. In this 
game Gallaudet played her famous opponents to a standstill, losing by the 
narrow maigin of six points. 

Georgetown University, Washington, D. C. — Summary of Georgetown's 
season: Won the South Atlantic championship. Was defeated but once 
during season — by the University of Pittsburg. Goal line crossed but once 
on home grounds. Scored total of 181 points against opponents' 26. Field 
goals numerous and feature of season. In two championship games, with 
North Carolina and Virginia, five field goals executed. 

Grand Island (Neb.) College. — The foot ball season for 1910 ended with 
the Grand Island College team well toward the front ranks. Five games 
were played, of which four were won. The game lost was the first game of 
the season and was played with Wesleyan University on October 7. 

Grove City (Pa.) College. — Taking the season as a whole, the team did 
splendid work. It suffered several severe losses during the year, however, 
which left it in a crippled condition for its Thanksgiving game. Captain 
Marks had his shoulder broken in the game on October 22, which kept him 
out. the rest of the season, W. A. Ginsbigler acting as captain to the close 
of the season. George De Witt Wick was manager. 




1„ Woodruff: 2, Messick. Coach; 3, Hart; 4, J. Smith; 5. Pritchard; 
Hughes; 7, Lavton; 8, Wertsehafter; 9, Borden, Capt. ; 10, Weidel; 11, 
"Walsh; 12, Miller; 13, Moore; 14. W. Smith; 15, MacNab. 
TRENTON (N. J.) HIGH SCHOOL. 




1, Adams; 2, Williamson; 3, Hopkins: 4. Berger: 5. Macomber; 6. Dr. Shoe- 
maker, Coach; 7, Broughton: S, Clough; 9. Moore, Capt.: 10, Heyburn; 11, 
Day; 12, Slagle; 13, McPhail; 14, Heath; 15, Crosby, Mgr. 
MORRISTOWN (N. J.) HIGH SCHOOL. 



f 






1, Bennett, Coach; 2, Harcourt, Coach; 3, Ewart, Mgr.; 4, Collins; 5, Sul- 
livan; 6, Higbee; 7, Lippman; 8, Wellhafer; 9, Scull; 10, Schwickerath; 11, 
Hammell; 12, Thomas; 13, H. Willits, Capt.; 14, Eble; 15, Mason; 16, L. 
Willits; 17, Yon; IS. McGee; 19. Saslaff. 

ATLANTIC CITY CN. J.) HIGH SCHOOL. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 225 

Hampden-Sidney (Va.) College. — With exception of the last game the 
team's record was fine, and deserves special praise when it is taken into 
consideration the number of men at Hampden-Sidney in proportion to those 
at the schools played. The team was well coached, and good team work did 
its share of winning games. The line was heavy, the ends fast, and the 
back-field composed of fine, offensive players. Those who deserve special 
mention are: Coach F. W. Yancey, Captain Yeager, right back; Jett, center, 
and Lewis, full-back. 

Hanover (Ind.) College. — The back-field was light and the line heavy, but 
too slow to make their weight effective under the new rules. The speed of 
the backs was not equal and hence their interference ragged. Cross-bucks 
by the right tackle and right half-back were the biggest line gainers. The 
outlook for the coming year is very much better. 

Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. — The team developed consistently 
throughout the season. It had an exceptionally strong line, good ends and 
fast backs. In the final game many opportunities were lost on account of 
costly fumbling. The team played its best games against Dartmouth and 
Brown. The score made by Cornell was made on a fluke, a poor pass for a 
kick in the last half of the second half. The line was- one of the most 
powerful that a Harvard team has had and the Yale game was not played 
up to the standard which the team had previously shown. 

Hastings (Neb.) College. — Although only three men had ever played the 
game before and the squad very small, Hastings' season was a good one, the 
team claiming the championship of the colleges of the State, not having a 
defeat. The strength of the team consisted mainly of its varied attack and 
its highly developed passing game. There were no injuries, even of a minor 
nature, nor was a man kept out of practice or a game on account of injuries. 

Hill School, Pottstown, Pa. — The season at Hill School is best summarized 
by the following extract from the New York Tribune: "The boys of Hill 
School, at Pottstown, Pa., have reason toi be proud of their foot ball eleven. 
Seven games were played, of which six were victories. The team was 
handicapped in the game lost to Princeton Preparatory by two goals from 
the field, because of the absence of its captain. The strength of the eleven 
lay in the striking ability of the backs in hitting the line or in circling the 
ends behind a surprisingly strong interference. The team as a whole 
appeared to be well up to the Hill standard, which is high." 

Holy Cross College, "Worcester, Mass. — Yale and Princeton defeated Holy 
Cross after hard games. Captain Fred Daley of Yale said after the game 
that "Holy Cross undoubtedly has one of the best minor college teams in 
the East." 

Hope College, Holland, Mich. — Considering the lack of a coach and of 
material for a strong team Hope College made a strong showing against 
Kalamazoo College and the Western State Normal, both of these teams having 
good coaches. The team was strong in defense, but a little weaker in 
offense. Open play was used, and the forward pass successfully tried, often 
for long gains. 

Howard University, "Washington, D. C. — Howard's team was one of the 
greatest in the history of the university. Her goal has not been crossed in 
two years. The opinion of the intercollegiate officials in the Howard-Lincoln 
game on Thanksgiving, the greatest game among colored colleges, was that 
Howard's back-field would compare favorably with any in the country. 
Considering the inadequate facilities for training, Howard's team was 
exceptionally good. 

Huron (S. D.) College. — Almost all the players were new men. They put 
up a fair college game and were always playing for sport's sake. Ro-sen- 
crance and Buckley were the sturs. 

Illinois "Wesleyan "University, Bloomington, HI, — The team started the 
season well by defeating a Conference team by means of a field goal. On 
the following Saturday the strong Lake Forest team, which is every year a 
contender to the All-Illinois college championship, were defeated in the -same 
manner. At Galesburg the team met its only defeat, which was brought 




1, J. Griffin, Mgr.; 2, J. LaGore; 3, Hunt; 4, Kelly; 5, Adams; 6, Miller; 7, 

Hainan; 8, Semmens; 9, Hetler; 10, Wood; 11, W. Do! ton, Capt. ; 12, H. 

LaGore; 13, Wallace; 14, Schadt. Rogers, Photo. 

MERCERSBURG (PA.) ACADEMY. 




1, Fox, Mgr.; 2, Earl; 3, Battles; 4, Spooner; 5, Hirst; 6, Washburn; 7, 
Tulsens; 8, Murdoek; 9, Townsend; 10, Sonder, Capt.; 11, Pepper; 12, Harris; 
13, Samuels; 14, Fritz; 15, Walthowe; 16, Frazier; 17, Chandler. 
EPISCOPAL ACADEMY, PHILADELPHIA. PA. 

Gilbert & Bacon, Photo. 









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1. Huliburt; 2, Wood; 3, Butler; 4, -Bennett,- Coach;- 5 r -Mason; 6, Wray; 7, 
Schmitt; 8, Hemphill; 9, Carrigan; 10, Brereton; 11, Thayer, Capt.; 12, 
Hunter; 13, Laird; 14, Cheston; 15, French; 16, Davis. 

CHESTNUT HILL ACADEMY, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 227 

about by a fumbled punti under the shadow of the goal posts, which a Knox 
man recovered and carried over. After this defeat the team settled down to 
business and wound up the season in a blaze of glory. 

Iowa State College, Ames, Iowa. — Inexperience was the handicap in 1910. 
While the team was good on offense, it was weak on defense. The kicking 
was good aad more open play was used than in former years. 

Kansas State Agricultural College, Manhattan, Kan. — The only defeat of 
the team — Colorado Springs — was attributed to the high altitude, which 
affected the men after fifteen minutes' play. The members were veterans 
and comprised a wonderful ground-gaining machine. Their most notable play 
was wide tackle swings by two excellent tackles, and the more or less open 
defense made this old-fashioned play a consistent ground-gainer. Forward 
passes were frequent and very successful — usually put in play from "punt" 
formation or end "laying out." The team was considered the fastest the 
college has ever had from the standpoint of team work, as quarter-back and 
about seven men had played together under the same coach for three previous 
years. 

Knox College, Galesburg, HI. — Coach Carrithers started the season with 
but two old men on the squad, Captain Gebhart, a speedy and reliable half- 
back, and Barclay, a 200-pound center. The team that was finally picked 
from the big squad was light but speedy. At different times in the season 
the several injuries greatly weakened the team. Knox was for a time in 
the running for the State championship, but losing to William and Vashti 
destroyed their hope. The only serious defeat suffered was at the hands of 
Beloit and was due in part to a hard trip and poor accommodations. Knox 
loses but one of her squad by graduation and there will probably be at least 
ten of her old men out for work this season. 

Lake Forest (HI.) College. — After a most successful foot ball season in 
years, Lake Forest claimed the college championship of Illinois and Wis- 
consin by defeating Knox, Monmouth and Beloit. They were defeated by 
Illinois and Wesleyan early in the year, who later on were defeated by 
Knox, thus giving Lake Forest a claim to the State championship, which 
was recognized by the Chicago papers. The last game of the season with 
Beloit was« to settle the championship of Illinois and Wisconsin. Five men 
were placed on the All-State selection and also on the Illinois and Wisconsin 
All-Star team. The schedule was very hard, but the team was fortunate in 
having a good coach and good players to carry it out. 

Louisiana Sttate University, Baton Rouge, La. — The season of 1910 at 
L. S. U. opened with bright prospects, but many unfortunate conditions arose. 
Captain Stovall, «\ star end, did not return, and his place was never filled. 
Lally, the All-Southern half-back in 1908, broke a bone in his leg in the 
ilrst game, making another big hole. Then Seip, All-Southern full-back in 
1909, was declared ineligible one week before the contest with Sewanee. 
With these three stars taken from the fold the team was defeated by 
Sewanee by a large score. The team, with but one veteran, Thomas at 
guard, played good ball, but were unable to cope with the large teams, such 
as Vanderbilt and Arkansas. 

Macalester College, St. Paul, Minn. — The team fought hard throughout the 
season and, although it lost all its games, gained the wholesome respect of 
its opponents. Lack of back-field material accounts for the poor showing to 
some extent. However, with the addition of some good back-field to the 
present nucleus of eight "M" men, a winning team will be assured. 

Marietta (Ohio) College. — Beginning the season with very poor prospects, 
Marietta played one of her most successful seasons. With a very light team, 
averaging only 157 pounds, the season registered only one defeat. The work 
of the team demonstrated the superiority of new foot ball over the old game. 
Coach Reiter deserves the greatest of credit for his development of raw 
material into a finished team. Captain Drumm proved an ideal leader, and 
was himself one of the best tacklers in the State. r 

Maryland Agricultural College, College Park, Md. — The work of the /team 
was without a doubt the most successful for a number of seasons. Although 
defeated in the last three games, the loss did not mar the success of the 



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1, Landon, JJgr. ; 2, Fritch; 3, Leckie; 4, Kane; 5, Orr, Coach; 6, Gillett; 7, 
Howard; 8, Geer; 9, Baxter; 10, Totter, Asst. Mgr.; 11, E. Brown; 12, Whit- 
ney; 13, Lewis; 14, Read; 15, Tuttle; 16, C. Brown; 17, Frissell; IS, 
Nickerson; 19, Clough; 20, Sherman; 21, Power; 22, B. Halligan, Cant.; 23, 
Wulf; 24, Donath; 25, M. Halligan. 

WORCESTER (MASS.) POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE. 




1, liana van; 2, Mitchell; 3, Ryther; 4, Walsh; 5, Welti; 6, Leary; 7, Haber- 

stro; 8, O'Day; 9, Galaway; 10, Hill; 11, Lautz, Mgr.; 12, Burford, Capt. ; 

13. Barnes; 14, Coughlin; 15, Baxter; 16, McBride. Kramer, Photo. 

TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL. BUFFALO. N. Y. 




1, Estey; 2, Houle; 3, Jackson, Coach; 4, Worthon; 5, A. Bean; 6, Harring- 
ton; 7, Bingham; 8, G. Bean; 9. Bronson, Mgr.; 10, Brusseau; 11, Fosgate; 
12, Perry; 14, Richardson, Capt.; 15, Johnson; 16, Levethan. 
LITTLETON (W. VA.) HIGH SCHOOL. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 229 

team in the least, as A. M. I., St. J., and W. M. C. had to fight from 
beginning to end. It is undeniable that the team was one of the fastest 
in the State, and in a great many cases success was due to speed, as in 
many instances opponents were much heavier. With plucky little Shipley, 
quarter-back, piloting the team with speed that caused much comment, plays 
were run off in a great many cases before opponents were in their positions. 
The team work was good and individuals starred in a great many cases, 
"Ship", especially, who had the honor of being selected as All-Maryland 
quarter. 

Massachusetts Agricultural College, Amherst, Mass. — Considering the odds 
the "Aggies" showed up very well, their aggressiveness, in spite of their 
158 pounds, causing a great deal of favorable comment. 

Mercersburg (Pa.) Academy. — The season at Mercersburg was a most suc- 
cessful one. A schedule of eight hard games was played throughout the 
season, of which Mercersburg won six, lost one and tied one. The big game 
of the season was with her rival, Lawrenceville, whom she easily defeated 
by a score of 27 to 0. When the All-Scholastic team was chosen, six 
members out of the eleven were Mercersburg men. 

Miami University, Oxford, Ohio. — Inexperienced players were in the main 
responsible for the comparatively poor showing of Miami last year, but the 
prospects for 1911 are very favorable, and with an even break Miami will 
look to her team to carry the colors to victory as in previous years. 

Michigan Agricultural College, East Lansing, Mich. — Defeated but once 
last year, and that by the University of Michigan with a close score, was 
the fine record for 1910. Exelby, full-back, and Baldwin, guard, have been 
placed among the very best in the Middle West. Hard, fast, on-the-square 
players was the reputation acquired by the M. A. C. team. 

Mississippi Agricultural and Mechanical College. — The season of 1910 was 
a most successful one, only two games being lost, while seven were won. 
The overwhelming defeat by the University of Mississippi was due in a large 
measure to an unfortunate train of injuries which, coming near the end of 
the season, kept four of the best men on the team out of the game Thanks- 
giving Day. The team was strong on offense and defense, as is shown by 
the scores of the games, and had A. and M. been able to present her 
strongest line-up Thanksgiving Day, it is possible that the game might have 
ended differently. Taken as a whole, the season was very successful. Vic- 
tories were scored over Tulane, Louisiana State and the University of 
Tennessee, all of which are old rivals. One of the best games of the season 
was the game with Auburn, which was played at Auburn. A. and M. gained 
more ground than Auburn, but a fumbled punt early in the game gave 
Auburn the ball on A. and M.'s 15-yard line and the opportunity to score. 
Thereafter the Auburn line held when in danger and A. and M.'s trials for 
a field goal were unsuccessful. Only four men graduate and prospects for 
1911 are very bright. 

Monmouth (111.) College. — Starting with but four regulars, the team was 
composed of very inexperienced material, who, however, gave a very good 
account of themselves, especially against Missouri and Marquette univer- 
sities, much heavier teams. The 1911 season looks very promising, and 
under the direction of Archie Hahn, who is still a joint holder of the record 
for 75 yards (7 3-5 seconds), the team should show excellent results. 

Morningside College, Sioux City, Iowa. — The team's work on the whole was 
very creditable. The climax and nerve force of the season was in the Ames 
game, when a slump occurred which was not overcome. 

Mount Union College, Alliance, Ohio. — Ohio newspapers admitted that 
Mount Union was the best exponent of new foot ball in the State. With a 
team considerably lighter than all their opponents, they lost only two games. 
Their strength was in their speed and ability to handle successfully the 
forward pass. 

Mount St. Mary's' College, Emmitsburg, Md. — The team, towards the end 
of the season, developed into a wonderful scoring machine, rolling up 120 
points in. the last two games. Captain Fagan, Flanagan, Giroux, Engel, 




1, Pouleur, Coach; 2, Ebelke; 3, Wiederman; 4, Burgdorf, Capt. ; 5, Trapp; 
6, Koenig; 7, Stall; 8, Heckell; 9, Shenker; 10, Tietgen; 11, Schulze; 12, 
Henzer; 13. Schleede; 14. Hilderbrand; 15. Hauser. 

CONCORDIA COLLEGE. BRONXYILLE, N. Y. 




1, McGee; 2, Reimers; 3, Felter; 4, Larsen, Coach; 5, Preager; 6, Byrne; 
Brierly; 8, Wagner; 9, McGivney; 10, Armstrong; 11, MacMath; 12, Gal- 
lagher; 13, Squire, Capt.; 14, Gamble; 15, Balcom; 16, Hernandez; 17, 
Palmer; 18, Sperry; 19, Jamer; 20, McKinney; 21, Roth. Coe, Photo. 

ERASMUS HALL HIGH SCHOOL, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 





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1, Elias, Asst. Mgr. ; 2, Harris; 3. Jackson, Coach; 4, Denton; 5, Jeffrey; 6, 
Brown, Capt.; 7, Riddick, Mgr.; 8, Curtice; 9, Woollcott; 10, Fancette; 11, 
Champion; 12, Bruner; 13. Denmark; 14. Coke; 15. Uzzle. 

RALEIGH (N. C.) HIGH SCHOOL. Wharton & Tyree, Photo. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 231 

McMorris and Wymaid were the stars. Mike Thompson, the famous foot ball 
official and coach, has taken charge of athletics at Mount St. Mary's. 

Muhlenberg- College, Allentown, Pa. — Muhlenberg's team was practically 
inexperienced in foot ball, many of the men having never played their 
respective positions before. Under efficient coaching they gained a fair; 
knowledge of the rules and put up a splendid exhibition. The season may 
be considered successful in view of the fact that foot ball at Muhlenberg is. 
yet in its infancy. 

New York University. — New York University was probably represented by 
the most powerful eleven of her athletic history. It is true the team did 
not repeat its undefeated record of the previous season, but this was due 
to the unusual stiffness of the schedule. Princeton and the Navy were held 
to the small scores of 12 — and 9 — 0, respectively, while Rutgers and 
Stevens were easily defeated and Wisconsin tied. The Violet was unfortunate 
in losing close contests to Wesleyan and Trinity. 

North Carolina Agricultural and Mechanical Arts, Raleigh, N. C. — The 1910 
A. and M. team tied with Georgetown University for the championship of the 
South Atlantic States. 

Northwestern "University, Evanston, 111. — It has been only a couple of years 
since Northwestern resumed foot ball. Thirty-three candidates, nine-tenth* 
of whom were entirely green men, responded to the call. The first game 
was played after ten days' practice, against an eleven of experienced men 
with two weeks' more training. During the season the eleven was much 
handicapped by class-room schedules — impossible to condition it for the final 
game. The Chicago and Wisconsin games were away from home. The men. 
showed good spirit and the team was said to have been the strongest in, 
seven years. 

Northwestern "University, "Watertown, "Wis. — The team played good ball the 
whole season. As Northwestern had no coach, other teams thought they 
would have "easy picking," but they generally walked from the gridiron 
with a different impression. 

Norwich "University, Northfield, Vt. — Norwich University had an exception- 
ally fast team. In its earlier games with Brown and Amherst the team was. 
handicapped by the condition of the men, due to a military "hike" and 
encampment. Norwich held the strong Trinity team to a small score, and 
in the big game, with the University of Vermont, completely outclassed the 
latter, winning by the score of 17—0. Norwich decisively trimmed Middle- 
bury College and won the title of "Champions of Vermont." 

Oberlin (Ohio) College. — The Oberlin College foot ball team began the 
season of 1910 with the poorest material in sight in years. The team as. 
finally selected was probably the lightest in the history of the college, but, 
by keeping in the best kind of condition and playing with the greatest exhi- 
bition of abandon and nerve, the team came through the season without a 
defeat, except in the preliminary game, which was played after four days' 
practice against a team that had been together about three weeks. The 
press and foot ball experts of Ohio unanimously awarded Oberlin the college 
foot ball championship of Ohio, and the Plaindealer trophy cup for Ohio- 
Conference foot ball teams was awarded to Oberlin. 

Olivet (Mich.) College. — The work of the team as a whole was very suc- 
cessful, winning all games on the home grounds and suffering defeat by only 
one intercollegiate team (Alma). The principal assets of the team were a 
very fast back-field and three heavy central men, but fast ball was their 
stronghold. 

Pacific University, Forest Grove, Ore. — The team played exceptionally well, 
being light and fast. The most yardage was made by using the forward 
pass. Not once during the season was time taken out for one of Pacific's, 
players and lightly sprained ankles were the extent of the injuries. The 
famous Willamette team outweighed the Pacific team 20 pounds per man, 
yet were held scoreless on a muddy field until the last quarter. 

Parsons College, Fairfield, Iowa. — The team was green, averaging 149- 
pounds. The men were very slow, with the exception of the captain. Run- 




1, Bennett; 2, Brimmer; 3, A. Dorwart; 4, J. Herman; 5, Saunt; 6, Mitchell; 

7, Mcllvaine; 8, A. Herman, Capt.; 9, Scott; 10, Keller; 11, Brown; 12, F. 

Donvart; 13, Shriver. Miesse, Photo. 

YEATES SCHOOL. LANCASTER. PA. 




1, Potteiger; 2, Campbell; 3, Reitzel; 4, Priory; 5, Sasaman; 6, Wolder; 7, 
Neice; 8, Ulrich; 9, Dubin; 10, Knipe; 11, Huber; 12, Ellis; 13, Miller; 14, 
Brown; 15, Chester. 

PERKIOMEN SEMINARY, PENNSBURG, PA. 




1, O'Brien, Coach; 2, Goldstein; 3, Buezko; 4, Brings; 5, Groome; 6, Slater, 



Mgr.; 7, Mackert; 8, Ambrose; 9, Martin, Capt.; 10, Trego; 11, Livingston; 
12, Chamberlain, Asst. Mgr.; 13, Hudnell; 14, Rippman; 15, Sadler; 16, 
Lorenzo; 17. Cornwell. 

CONWAY HALL CARLISLE. PA. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 233 

ing interference was the strongest point. As a whole, the work done was- 
all that could be expected under the circumstances. 

Penn College, Oskaloosa, Iowa. — The team was composed of strong but 
inexperienced players, which played them at a decided disadvantage against 
more experienced ones. Only one player will be lost by graduation and the 
prospects are good for a strong team the coming season. 

Pomona (Cal.) College. — Coach Stanton of Pomona College found himself 
under great adversity at the beginning of the 1910 foot ball season. Only 
four members of the championship 1909 team returned. The freshmen class 
was rich in back-field material, but had no linemen. The first two games 
showed the Pomona line to be exceptionally weak, but in the Whittier game 
showed great improvement. In the Occidental College game, the team dis- 
played wonderful strength on defense and marvelous improvement in speed 
and dash on offense. The championship game with the University of Southern 
California proved to be one of the greatest games ever recorded in southern 
California foot ball history. Both had not met defeat. When the dust from 
the final clash had settled, both teams were tied for the championship, the 
score being 9 to 9. The most prominent players that put Pomona to the 
front were Shutt and Clary. Shutt at left half has no equal in southern 
California, as a back-field man. In Clary, Pomona had a jewel. He dis- 
played rare ability in calling plays and his ability as a goal kicker was a 
great factor in Pomona's success. 

Purdue University, Lafayette, Ind. — The team was green and showed a 
stea ly development during the season. They were light, but exhibited good- 
fighting qualities, and their form was first-class during latter part of the 
season. In the last game, against Indiana, they gained about as much- 
ground as did Indiana. 

Kandolph-Maeon College, Ashland, Va. — The Randolph-Macon team won the 
championship of the Eastern Division of the Virginia Intercollegiate Athletic 
Association, this being the first time the trophy offered has been captured by 
any college for five years. Randolph-Macon has tied for the title each 
season during this period. 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, N. Y. — The opening game with 
Williams showed the team in good shape, but, owing to several of the best 
men being injured and unable to play, Rensselaer's play was erratic. In 
games with Hamilton, Middlebury and Rochester the team showed what it 
was capable of doing. Most of last year's team will be back this fall and 
a very successful season is anticipated. 

Rhode Island State College, Kingston, R. I. — The average weight of team 
was 165 pounds, being exceedingly light to play such teams as Tufts and 
Brown. Success was due to speed and the fact that during the entire season 
there was not even a minor injury to a player. Only one game was lost, 
and that to Brown. 5 — 0. 

Ripon (Wis.) College. — In regard to the championship in foot ball among 
the secondary colleges of Wisconsin, Ripon College is tied with Lawrence 
and Carroll colleges. Beloit College games were thrown out because of the 
playing of an ineligible man (Coffeen). Ripon's 1910 team was composed of 
nine freshmen, one 1909 substitute and one old man. Under the conditions 
they did much better than was expected, relying upon clever team work and 
forward passes. By defeating' Lawrence College in the final game of the 
season, 10 to 8, Ripon closed one of the most successful seasons. Lawrence 
College tied the University of Wisconsin in the early part of the season by 
a score of 6 to 6. E. O. Stiehm, a former University of Wisconsin man, 
coached the team and showed his efficiency by working a bunch of raw 
material into a successful foot ball team. 

Rock Hill College, Ellicott City, Md. — The season of 1910 was one of the 
most successful that Rock Hill ever had. Out of seven hard games only 
two were lost. The team owed much of its success to the clear under- 
standing of the new rules under the coaching of Page Hunter. Two of the 
games were won almost entirely on fast playing, as the team was not up to 
the average in weight. Three men were lost by graduation. Fucey, last 
year's captain, has been re-elected for the 1911 season. One of the members, 




1, Reese; 2, Ayers; 3, Nissley; 4, Farber; 5, Johnson, Coach; 6, Poland; 7, 
Ruhe; 8, Crichton; 9, Wuchter; 10, Lochrie; 11, Wiekert; 12, Rowland, 
Coach; 13, Smith; 14, Fehr; 15, Vreeland, Capt.; 16, Krushank; 17, Ferris. 
BETHLEHEM (PA.) PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 




1, Rawson; 2, Batten; 3, Rose; 4, Dougherty, Coach; 5, Shellenberger: 6, 
Batties, Mgr. ; 7, Freed; 8, Haney; 9, Roebuck; 10, R. McKenny. Capt.; 11, 
Shermer. BROWN PREPARATORY SCHOOL. PHILADELPHIA, PA, 




1, Hopler; 2, Bluemle; 3, Davis; 4, Ingersoll; 5, Hunter; 6, Smith; 7, Brown, 

Mgr. ; 8, Levergood; 9, Stuempfle; 10, Hartman, Coach: 11. Morris, Capt.; 

12, Wykoff; 13, Bathurst; 14, Henninger; 15, Hullihan; 16. Emerick; 17, Hill. 

WILLIAMSPORT (PA.) HIGH SCHOOL. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 235 

Long, was put at right tackle on the All-Maryland team by the sporting 
-writers of the State. 

Rollins College, Winter Park, Fla. — Rollins played under great disadvan-! 
tages, being very short of material and handicapped by illness and injuries, 
■eight substitutes starting in the University of Florida game. Rollins used 
the forward pass and outside kicks to good advantage, at times being obliged 
to rely almost entirely on them for gains. This fall Rollins expects to 
duplicate the victorious year of 1908-09, when they went through the season 
without a defeat and won the championship of the State and Cuba. 

Rose Polytechnic Institute, Terre Haute, Ind. — The season's scores give 
only a fair estimate of the team's work. That Rose Poly, with an enroll- 
ment of two hundred, should hold a team like Yanderbilt to a 23 — score, 
when Vanderbilt held Yale — 0, seems to show the merit of the team 
■developed by the small school. 

Rutgers College, New Brunswick, N. J. — Rutgers' team experienced a very 
successful season in every way, due principally to the preparation of the 
team by Coach Gargan. The dash and spirit of the team was shown through- 
out the entire season. There was an apparent slump in the playing after 
the Swartbmore game, but the team came back strong toward the end of the 
season. 

Shurtleif College, Upper Alton, 111. — The team's work in 1910 was the 
cause of great satisfaction to Shurtleff's followers, who had not anticipated 
the game put up by its men, as experience was very limited, the weight 
light, the team averaging only 153 pounds. The playing of Captain Beeby 
at half was remarkable, his punting ability being very great. In the Thanks- 
giving Day game, with Milliken, his punts averaged 50 yards, some of them 
going 80 yards. His line plunging was also high class. Coon's- defensive 
work was notable and strong. 

Simpson College, Indianola, Iowa. — Simpson's team developed rapidly and at 
the end of the season was one of the best in the State. Simpson is given 
thet credit of being one of the best teams in the country on the use of open; 
toot ball. Only two men will be lost from last year's team, therefore this 
year's team should be a record-breaker. 

Southern University, Greensboro, Ala. — Last year was the second of inter- 
collegiate foot ball at this institution, and although being compelled to 
utilize raw material, Coach Pratt developed a swift team, which, although it 
deteriorated toward the close, on account of lightness and inexperience, 
nevertheless gave promise of developing into a team to be reckoned with the 
coming season. 

State University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky. — The 1910 team was 
extremely light, the four men in the back-field averaging about 145 pounds. 
The coach, E. R. Sweetland, developed a first-class fighting machine out of 
the material available, and the prospects for the season are encouraging. 

State University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. — At the beginning of the 
season Coach Hawley had only a few veterans, with a number of only fair 
men. Instead of trying to develop a brilliant offense for the early games, 
the coach worked consistently to perfect a team which w T ould win the 
majority of games played, and the success after the middle of the season 
amply justified his system. Iowa scored more points on Purdue than any 
other Conference college, and at that missed three touchdowns only by 
Inches. The season was the most successful Iowa has had since their great 
team of 1900. Prospects for this year are very favorable. 

St. John's College, Annapolis, Md. — St. John's had a rather disastrous 
season last fall. This was due to the fact that the team was composed 
largely of inexperienced men, nearly all of the 1909 team having graduated. 
Toward the end of the season the team showed great Improvement and the 
result of the final games was very gratifying. 

St. Joseph's College, Dubuque, Iowa. — St. Joseph's College team* in 1910 was; 
outweighed by. all of the teams played, but by successfully working the_ 
forward pass won all but one game. In the Mornirgside game they had to' 
play without Captain Kerwick and Holland, the star full-back, whose shoulder 







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1, Luck; 2, Hosmer; 3, Jacobs; i, Colling, Capt.; 5, Krauss; 6, Zuckmaier, 
Asst. Mgr.; 7, Baxter; 8, Bellinger; 9, Edmonds; 10, Heerdt; 11, Tussing; 
12, Simson; 13, R. Koenig, Mgr.; 14, Peters; 15, Sehreiber; 16, W. Rogers; 
17, J. Rogers; 18, Lochinan; 19, I. Koenig; 20, Gibson; 21, Walker; 22, 
Meiers. TONAWANDA (N. Y.) HIGH SCHOOL. Stunipf, Photo. 




1, Wolgast; 2, Crabb; 3, Wallice, Coach; 4, Neihouse; 5, Hoover; 6, Rob- 
ertson; 7, Greer, Mgr.; 8, Scobv; 9. Mve; 10, Rich; 11, Hiam; 12, Aiken; 
13, Root; 14, Fisher; 15, Hilwig; 16, Berger, Capt. ; 17, Petrie. 
NORTH TONAWANDA (N. Y.) HIGH SCHOOL. 



1, Smith; 2, Roof; 3, Johnson; 4, Saltsman; 5, Prof. West; 6, Butler; 7, 
Odell, Asst. Mgr.; 8. Fox; 9, Mosher; 10, Dinneen; 11, Hall; 12, Haggerty; 
13, Schiemer, Mgr.; 14, Bolster, Capt.; 15, Hoffman; 16, Hook. 
ST. JOHNS VILLE (N. Y.) HIGH SCHOOL. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 237 

was injured in a previous game. The team deserved much praise for their 
defensive vrork in all games, but in the absence of their regular quarter and 
full-back were unable to advance the ball for many touchdowns. 

St. Lawrence "University, Canton, N. Y. — Critics concede that St. Lawrence 
was very strong on the defensive and on forward passes. They also gained 
much ground on end runs. 

St. Loui3 (Mo.) University. — St. Louis University won the championship of 
Missouri, defeating Missouri School of Mines and Missouri University, 3 — 0, 
after the Mines had played the University an — game the week before. 
Syracuse University was only able to score by two field goals, one of which 
was questionably close. The team was a great improvement over its prede- 
cessor of 1909. 

St. Viator College, Kankakee, 111. — St. Viator College, under the excellent 
coaching of "Jack" Marks of Dartmouth, had a very successful season. Had 
Mr. Marks arrived a little earlier it would have been safe to predict the 
team would not have lost a game, as his coaching did wonders. Fitzgerald 
played star ball. A fast team is sure for 1911. 

Talladega (Ala.) College. — With a set of comparatively new men Coach 
Johnson, after hard, consistent work, was able to mould a team that was 
able to hold its own against the best. The prospects for the coming season 
are very promising indeed. 

Tarkio (Mo.) College. — After starting the season with only three veterans 
Coach Elder succeeded in whipping the squad of green men into a team 
which was defeated only once and scored on only twice during the season, 
and which put up a better class of foot ball in Kansas City against Wash- 
burn than was shown by Missouri and Kansas the previous season. The 
team also contained the best place and drop-kicker of the Missouri colleges. 

Texas Agricultural and Mechanical College, College Station, Tex.^— The 
team claims the Texas championship for 1910. It was defeated by Arkansas 
by a field goal and safety. 

Thomas S. Clarkson School of Technology, Potsdam, N. Y. — Owing to the 
circumstance of Clarkson not having had a team the past six years, they 
were handicapped by havinsr all new material to work upon, which is the 
reason for the short schedule. However, a nucleus has been formed for this 
year, and, by the showing of the team in the last game, a tie score, a good, 
strong team in the field for the season of 1911 is a certainty. 

Trinity College, Hartford, Conn. — The Trinity team, whose work during the 
past three seasons has been out of proportion to the size of the institution, 
completed its schedule with its goal line crossed but twice during the season, 
once by the Army and once by New York University. 

Trinity University, Waxahachie, Tex. — Manager Low states that Trinity 
was by far the lightest in the State, but never failed to make a comfortable 
showing when opposed to players of that weight. The material was mostly 
new, but by diligent work an eleven was gotten into shape that gave a good 
account of themselves. 

Tufts College, Medford, Mass. — Owing to many setbacks, Tufts did not 
make the usual good showing. The redeeming features were the work of 
Merrill, the captain for 1911. and Bohlin. 

Tulane University, New Orleans, La. — Last season's team was the lightest 
that ever represented the institution, with a schedule far too heavy for 
them, and although a losing team, fought every inch of the field. 

University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Ala. — The University team was very 
light and green, but two old men having returned for the team; therefore, 
the work of the whole season was largely constructive. However, the team 
showed pluck and fighting, in all its games, being always handicapped by the 
weight of the opponents. Alabama's weight at no time during the season 
was more than 149 pounds. Coming strong at the end of the season and 
defeating Tulane and Washington and Lee. the reason was considered a 
success. 
E 




1, Alway, Trainer; 2, Forster: 3, Purtill; 4, Jarrett; 5, Henning; 6, Gers- 
maii. Asst. Mgr.; 7, Kerr, Coach: 8, Tugwell; 9, Evans; 10, Speidel; 11. 
Neu; 12, Stagg, Mgr.; 13, A. Sullivan; 14, Goldberg; 15, Drexilius, Capt. ; 
16, Freeman; 17, Sullivan. Bingham, Photo. 

MASTEN PARK HIGH SCHOOL, BUFFALO, N. Y. 



I * 1 * f t 



1, Fiibrick; 2, Graves; 3, Hauenstein; 4, Bissell; 5, Moncrieff, Mgr.; 6, 

Harmon: 7, Cohn; 8, Houpt: 9, Clifton; 10, Betts, Capt.; 11, Roberts; 12. 

Scheu; 13, Finch; 14, McDonnell; 15, Potter. Beach. Photo. 

NICHOLS SCHOOL. BUFFALO, N. Y. 




1, Likens; 2, Makely; 3. Dietzer; 4, Adams; 5, McGregor; 6, Case; 7. 

Whiting; S, Kelly; 9, Robinson. Capt.; 10. Huber; 11, Smithson: 12, Norris; 

13, Lane; 14, Leahy; 15, Edmonds; 1G, Smith. Beach, Photo. 

LAFAYETTE HIGH SCHOOL, BUFFALO, N. Y. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 239 

University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio. — Transylvania was easy for 
the first game. Th£ team of 1909 was back, almost to a man. State proved 
to be a little too strong, although 'Varsity pushed them hard. The score 
was run up on flukes. From then on there was clear sailing until a snag 
was struck in Otterbein. Their coach taught them Carlisle foot ball and it 
worked, although Cincinnati was stronger on straight foot ball. In the 
Central game the latter outweighed Cincinnati and the game was a good 
fleal harder fought than the score shows. Antioch was a snap. By this thv.o 
the team was ready for Dennison on Thanksgiving and proved it by defeating 
them, 28—12. 

University of Detroit, Detroit, Mich. — The team as a whole, although handi- 
capped by a late start, played as a machine. In the first two games the 
team met two of the best foot ball teams in the State in M. A. C. and 
Olivet, and the scores of their opponents in these games easily showed the 
lack of condition. After these games the team found itself and played 
brilliantly. 

University of Illinois, Urbana, HI. — As was stated by many foot ball 
experts, this was the greatest defensive team the West has shown in many 
years. The fact that the University of Illinois team was not scored on 
substantiates this. An attempt at rating the teams in the West on a com- 
parative score basis is out of the question, because of the number of upsets. 
However, it is generally admitted that Illinois, Michigan and Minnesota were 
by far the three best teams in the West, with little to> choose between them. 

University of Maine, Orono, Me. — Starting under unfavorable circumstances, 
with a new coach and few old players, the team developed rapidly and 
played consistent ball up to the Bates game, when a severe attack of over- 
confidence was their undoing. However, the next week Colby was easily 
defeated, and on November 12, in one of the hardest games ever seen in 
the State, Bowdoin and Maine tied, — 0. The great kicking of Shepard, 
full-back, was the feature of the season. 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. — The team's playing the early 
part of last season was very erratic, probably being due, to a certain extent, 
to unfamiliarity with the new rules. After the Ohio State game, however, 
and following several shifts in the line-up, in the course of which Cromwell 
was placed at center, Bogle and Quinn alternating at guard, and W T ells 
shifted from tackle to end. In the Syracuse game the team's playing showed 
marked improvement. The Minnesota-Michigan game of November 19 was 
probably the best played game ever played on Feiry Field. 

University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo. — The goal line of the Missouri team 
of 1910 was crossed but once during the entire season, when the University 
of Kansas did' the trick in the last game of the season. Iowa State College 
scored her six points by two field goals. The game between the Universities 
of Missouri and Kansas, played in Kansas City on Thanksgiving Day, is the 
largest drawing card of any college athletic event in the Missouri Valley. 
In 1910 the estimated number of spectators was 20,000. The total receipts 
were $40,000. The energies of both teams are directed through the entire 
season to this one game, and it is usually the best exhibition of foot ball 
in the Missouri Valley. In the 1910 game both teams fought to the finish. 
Kansas scored her five points in the last few moments of play. T. E. D. 
Hackney, the Missouri full-back and captain for 1911, was easily the star 
of the game, and was voted by officials and coaches throughout the valley as 
the star foot ball player of the season in this section. 

University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb. — Nebraska claims the undisputed 
championship of the Missouri Valley and made perhaps the largest score of 
the season when they played Haskell Indians on Thanksgiving Day at Lincoln. 

University of Oregon, Eugene, Ore. — On account of conflicts, Oregon could 
not play University of Washington or Washington State College. Team 
showed up strong and played up to standard. W. Hayward is the athletic 
director. 

University of Pittsburg, Pittisburg, Pa. — Last season was the greatest in 
the history of the university, the team going through the season without 
being scored upon. The work of Captain R. W. Richards at full-back was 



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1. Patsh, Coach; 2, Delaney; 3, Fretz; 4, Charnplin; 5, Mason; 6, Rogers; 7, 

Lynam; 8, Albertson; 9, Martin; 10, Johnston; 11, Gaudy; 12, Frost; 13, 

Gordon, Capt. ; 14, Jackson; 15, Minten; 16, Leslie. Gilbert, Photo. 

SWARTHMOEE (PA.) PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



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1. Prof. Kerr; 2, Mr. Roe; 3. Thomas; 4, Tyler; 5, Matron; 6, Prof. Cober; 
7. Opsion; 8, Monheim; 9, Baker; 10, McCutcheon; 11, Lyons, Capt.; 12, 
Shaw; 13, Gass; 14, Bihlman; 15, Ewing; 16, Erickson; 17, Glick. 
PITTSBURG (PA.) HIGH SCHOOL. 



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l. S. Kirk; 2, Maguire; 3, F. Crentzberg; 4, Mr. Wilson, Supt. of Schools 
5, Albertson; 6, Levengood, Mgr. ; 7, Allen, Coach; 8, P. Kirk, Asst. Mgr. 
9, G. Canizares; 10, Dixon Lynch; 11, Wilson; 12, Hildebrand; 13, Hoopes 
14, Bateman; 15, Howiey; 16, Adams; 17, Fansler; 18, Hart; 19, David 
Lynch; 20, Franklin Wagner; 21, A. Canizares; 22, Lengel; 23, H. Crentz- 
berg; 24, Lienhardt; 25. A. Cornog; 26, Hunter; 27, Fred Wagner; 28, Fleck; 
29, J. Maguire, Capt.; 30, E. Cornog; 31, Megargee. 

RADNOR HIGH SCHOOL. WAYNE. PA. 



SPALDLNG'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 241 

wonderful, his forward passing being almost perfect, and his punting averag- 
ing 50 yards. The work of Galvir. at center and Dewar at quarter-back 
equalled the play almost of Captain Richards and contributed greatly to the 
team's success*. 

University of South Carolina, Columbia, S. C. — The team as a whole did 
excellent work, considering the material to pick from. Several of the best 
men were out of the game with some of the team's strongest opponents. 
In no game except the first was the full strength of the team exhibited. 
There seemed to be a tendency among the men to try to individual rather 
than team work, but Dr. Neff had about stamped this out before the close 
of the season. There is no excuse to offer for the disastrous defeats that 
were suffered, but a much better team is expected for this year, as there is 
plenty of promising material and a good coach. 

University of South Dakota, Vermillion, S. D. — South Dakota adapted itself 
to the new rules right from the start, and there is where its success lay. 
The team was considered by far the best scoring team that ever represented 
the University. The fact that it held Minnesota to a lower score than any 
other team save Michigan and actually scored nine points on Nebraska, the 
champions of the Missouri Valley, is regarded exceptional for so small a 
team, especially one so light. 

University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn. — The University of the South 
("Sewanee Tiger") team of 1910 was composed of much new material, espe- 
cially in the line. Consequently, although capable of speed and aggressive- 
ness, the line did not have sufficient endurance and weight to cope success- 
fully with one or two of the lines arrayed against it during the season; 
•especially is this true of the Central and Vanderbilt games. In the latter 
contest it was generally conceded that the Tigers had much the best of it 
through the first quarter, all six of Sewanee' s score being made before Van 
derbilt gained a point — the six representing two drop-kicks from the field. As 
long as the line was able to hold, Sewanee' s back-field was the most efficient 
in the South. Captain Lanier, Browne, Myers and Ward w r ere swift, har- 
monic in action, and certain to gain if they could but get started. In the 
game against Louisiana State University, particularly, where the line seemed 
to reach its highest efficiency, the backs were phenomenal. This was prob- 
ably Sewanee's best offensive game of the season. In Gillein the Tigers hac* 
the best kicker in the South. His punts averaged from 50 to 00 yards and 
during the entire season he made about 75 per cent, of his attempted drop- 
kicks from the field, some of them from unusual distances. On the whole, 
then, Sewanee's team w T as fast and dangerous for any adversary, and it lost 
only those games where greatly superior age and weight told heavily. 

University of Texas, Austin. Tex. — The team started out doing phenomenal 
work, winning its first games by heavy scores against creditable schools. 
The only feature to mar the season was the game with Baylor, which was 
forfeited to Texas, on account of Baylor refusing to play on a disputed 
decision of officials. The great game of the year was with Auburn; the 
Texas line held the heavy-bucking Streit and managed to annex nine points. 
The schedule at this point had too many heavy games scheduled, which 
resulted in a somewhat poor finish. 

University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah. — Last year was Utah's first in 
the Rocky Mountain Conference and the first with freshman and residence 
rules, consequently the eligible squad was small in number. The following 
were selected for the All-Rocky Mountain team: Home (captain), tackle; 
Romney, half-back; Richardson, full-back. 

University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va. — Virginia's season of 1910 was 
rather uneventful and the team not up to the usual Virginia standard. The 
year's three most important games were with Georgetown, Carolina and the 
Indians. The latter game, which preceded Georgetown, lessened Virginia's 
chances with the latter materially. The team was very light, but fast. 

University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. — The season of 1910 was in many 
respects a very peculiar one for Wisconsin. It opened very inauspiciously by 
Lawrence holding Wisconsin to a tie. Hitherto this game had been consid- 
ered only a practice game. Then, about a month later, Indiana defeated 




1, Hartman; 2, Lentz. Coach; 3, Hess; 4, Newpher 
Mgr. ; 7. Fenstermacher; 8, Ward; 9, Shock; 10 
Zimmerman; 12, Pyfer; 13, Mylin. 

FRANKLIN AND MARSHALL ACADEMY 



5, Terry; 6, Thatcher, 
Harrison; Capt. ; 11, 
Miesse, Photo. 
LANCASTER. PA, 




STERLING TEAM, WILKINSBURG, PA. 




1. Nuttall; 2, MeCnne; 3. Robinson: 4. Schoen: 5, Jennings; 6, Allderdice; 
7. Fownes: 8, Morrison; 9, Bradford; 10, Gellatly; 11, Laughlin; 12, Bray; 
13, Babcock. 

BOYS' COLLEGIATE SCHOOL, PITTSBURG, PA. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 243 

Wisconsin for the first time in a great many years, and Minnesota over- 
whelmed Wisconsin by the score of 28 to 0. The season closed with the 
defeat of Chicago to the tune of 10 to 0. This was a very welcome victory, 
in view of the fact that Wisconsin had not defeated Chicago in ten years, 
and was received with intense pleasure by Wisconsin students and alumni all 
over the country. 

University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyo. — Although very much lighter than 
any of their opponents and outweighed in every game, the "Cowboys," as 
they were called, played hard, scrappy ball, and in several cases more than 
equalled the beef of their opponents. The lightest team played, excepting 
high school practice games, outweighed the locals twelve pounds to the man. 
The sensation of the season was the brilliant playing of Burgess, whose 
marked ability in kicking, tackling and running with the ball, together with 
superb generalship, won him a place as quarter-back on the All-Rocky Moun- 
tain team. The team has made wonderful improvement in the last year. 
This is due to Coach Dean, who has the credit of making the greatest 
showing with the new rules of any coach in the Rocky Mountain region. 

United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md. — The season of 1910 was the 
most successful the Navy ever had. Never was there a Navy team so evenly 
balanced. The season was started with abundance of material, and, though 
many of the candidates were not seasoned players, they had the ability and 
willingness, and the second team was of 'Varsity caliber. The object of the 
season's work was to bring the team along gradually and to have them at 
their best for the Army game. No real effort was made to win any but the 
Army game. 

Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn. — Vanderbilt's eleven of 1910 was 
composed largely of light, inexperienced men, who did not reach their stride 
until mid-season, when they suddenly found themselves and played beyond 
their strength the remainder of the season. At the beginning of the year 
the line was the weak point, but under excellent coaching it showed won- 
derful development and became the strongest part of the team. The whole 
team excelled in defensive play, which is shown by the fact that during the 
whole season her goal line was uncrossed, even by such formidable opponents 
as Yale and the strongest elevens in Dixie. 

Villanova (Pa.) College. — Injuries in the Carlisle game and a lack of good 
substitutes were accountable for the large score in the Princeton game. The 
team finished the season, nevertheless, in good form. 

Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, Va. — At Chapel Hill, the V. M. I. 
team held North Carolina to a — score until the last two minutes of play, 
when North Carolina scored by a fluke play. In the Virginia game the 
mettle of the team was not shown as strongly as in other contests, owing to 
similar plays. V. M. I. was the only Southern team to score on Georgetown. 

Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Blacksburg, Va. — V. P. I. had a very suc- 
cessful year, considering the schedule. One of the chief points of the season's 
work was holding the strong Navy team to a field goal. 

Wabash College, Crawfordsville, Ind. — In four games 118 to their oppo- i 
nents' 0, tells the story of the best team Wabash ever had. Their goal was 
in danger only twice during the four games. 

Washington and Jefferson College, Washington, Pa. — On account of the 
enforcement of the one-year residence rule for the past three seasons, the 
W. and J. team has gradually weakened, and last season saw the lightest 
team that ever represented the institution. In the last three games, however, 
the team played brilliantly, holding the powerful Pittsburg team to two 
touchdowns and a field goal, and defeating Villanova on Thanksgiving Day. 
The one-year residence rule has been rescinded and it is to be expected that 
W. and J. will strike back for the place she once occupied in Western 
Pennsylvania foot ball circles. 

Washington University, St. Louis, Mo. — Washington began her 1910 foot 
ball season with the poorest prospects in years. Several of last year's vet- 
erans were lost to the team, due to strict scholarship requirements, while 
new material was scanty and especially inexperienced. Toward the middle of 




1, Mathieu; 2, Danenhouer; 3, Ingersoll; 4, Williams; 5, Hallawell, Mgr. ; 
6, Lumley; 7, Koons; 8, Allen; 9, Clarke, Capt. ; 10, Shoemaker; 11, 
Anderson; 12, Orleman; 13, Johnstone; 14, Warren. Gilbert, Photo. 

TENN CHARTER SCHOOL. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 




1, Greene; 2, E. Commins; 3, Stratten; 4, Bailey; 5, Allen; 6, Morris; 7, 
Foster; 8, Gillis; 9, Sams; 10. J. B. Turner, Coach; 11, Underwood; 12, 
Moore; 13, Griffith; 14, J. Commins; 15, E. Brown, Capt. Kuhns, Photo. 

LOCUST GROVE (GA.) INSTITUTE. 




1, Graham; 2, Trax; 3, Steffee; 4, Loeke, Mgr.; 5. Dickey; 6, Scott: 7, 

Shaughnessy; 8, Bums; 9, McAlavy, Capt.; 10, Richards: 11. Turnbull; 12, 

Wood; 13. Simon. Art Nouveau. Photo. 

OIL CITY (PA.) HIGH SCHOOL. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 245 

the schedule, injuries, together with lack of weight, despairingly weakened the 
squad. Fight was always evident until that point of the game came when 
"beef" counted. Thus the team battled through the remainder of a heavy 
schedule. 

Wesleyan University, Middletown, Conn.— With only three upper class men, 
who bad formerly played, with which to start the season, Wesleyan devel- 
oped one of the best teams she has had for years. Though somewhat weak 
on the offensive, the team showed wonderful strength on the defensive, 
Neither Amherst nor Williams were able to cross her goal line. Wesleyan 
lost four games, won four, and succeeded in holding Williams to a scoreless 
tie at Williamstown. The scores, however, are no indication of her success, 
as it was a constructive season, and 1911 will see practically the same team 
on the field, 

Western Maryland College, Westminster, Md.— The Western Maryland team 
of 1910 was conceded to have the best development of the forward pass in 
the South. The team had a line of inexperienced men and was consequently 
unable to develop a consistent scoring machine. No opponent, however, was 
oven able to approach a solution of their forward pass. In the game with 
Johns Hopkins, Western Maryland gained 192 yards on forward passes, but 
lost the game to the heavier team. This contest is played annually for the 
championship of the State. 

West Virginia Wesleyan College, Buckhannon, W. Va. — Under the coaching 
of W. H. Edwards, who captained Notre Dame, Western champions of 1909, 
W T est Virginia Wesleyan produced the best team in her history. The defen- 
sive work of the team was strong from the beginning of the season, and in 
the game with Marietta, especially, the development of an offensive system 
far in advance of anything formerly displayed became apparent. Through 
the death of the State University captain, the game which would have 
decided the State championship could not be played, with the result that 
W. V. U. and Wesleyan, from comparative scores with other teams, stand 
tied for the 1910 championship. Only four members of the team are lost by 
graduation this year, and as Edwards will again have charge of the team, 
the West Virginia Methodist institution expects to turn out a winning 
aggregation this season. 

Willamette University, Salem, Ore. — The foot ball season of 191Q at Willa- 
mette University was the best in its history. The college spirit, which has 
been slumbering for years at this venerable institution, has developed most 
rapidly during the past two seasons until now it is unexcelled anywhere. As 
the result of this awakening and splendid student support the team was 
exceptionally strong. Playing the new game to the limit the Methodists' 
light but aggressive team lost only one game, and that by accident, in early 
season to the State Agricultural College. After this the team developed 
rapidly and gave the Multnomah Athletic Club the worst defeat in their 
history, 29 — 0-. As Multnomah defeated the Oregon State University team, 
this gave Willamette greater prestige. In Rader- at full-back, Willamette 
has the best man in the Northwest for this position. Booth at quarter is a 
splendid punter and place-kicker, while in McRae at end, Captain McMechan 
at half, and Blackwell center, Willamette has players as strong as any in 
the Northwest. 

Worcester (Mass.) Polytechnic Institute. — Although the material was good, 
the work of the team did not do it justice in early games. At Amherst the 
team did not begin to play the game it showed itself capable of later on in 
the Holy Cross game. The Rhode Island game was played principally with 
scrubs, with the idea of saving the men for the big game of the season, 
against Holy Cross. It was in this game that thp team really, found itself, 
and although they did not win, came so close to it that the Holy Cross men 
were plainly worried. 




1, Crane; 2, Doht; 3, Gray; 4, Tompkins, Mgr.; 5, Wood; 6, Stanford; 7, 

Hawkins; 8. Sehinnagel ; 9, Styer, Coach; 10, Morehouse; 11, Curtis; 12, 

Rockwell; 13, Heiner; 11, Lyman; 15, Richards; 16, Lee, Capt. Rolfe, Photo. 

BORDENTOWN (N. J.) MILITARY ACADEMY. 




1, Clark, Mgr. ; 2, Halsey, Coach; 3, Tiemann; 4, Savage; 5, S. Bonnell; 6, 
McPherson; 7, Laggren; 8, L. Bonnell; 9, Allen; 10, Towl; 11, Brown; 12, 
Slauson; 13, Blatz; 14, Stork; 15, Barr; 16, Pope, Capt.; 17, Sullivan; 18, 
Wreaks; 19, Banker. pjNGRY SCHOOL, ELIZABETH, N. J. Hiller, Photo. 





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1, F. Maroney, Coach; 2, Brockie; 3, Rummel; 4, Schlessinger; 5, Nichols; 
6, Clark; 7, McCoy; 8, O'Brien; 9, J. M. Brynes, Mgr.; 10, Harries; 11, 
Edniiston; 12, Kellogg; 13, D. Malcom, Capt.; 14, Cummings; 15, D. Munsick; 
16, B. Munsick; 17, Houghton; IS, Sertz; 19, Purdy; 20, Eberstadt; 21, 
Osman; 22, Hester. NEWARK (N. J.) ACADEMY. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 24? 



Records of Teams 



ALFRED (N. Y.) UNIVERSITY. 

0— Chamberlain M.I. 6 0— Syracuse Fresh. 10 83— Merrill Inst. 

5 — Mansfield Norm. 6 5 — Hobart Coll. 23 6 — St. Bonaventure 5 

ALLEGHENY COLLEGE. MEADVILLE, FA. 

17— Hiram 5 6— Grove City 6 2— Westminster 

22— Geneva 27 — Carnegie Tech 6— Buchtel 12 

ALLENTOWN (FA.) PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 

13— Perkiomen Sem. 5— Lafayette Sophs. 11 21— Frank. & Marshall 

5— Wesley T.S. 0— Cent. H.S., Phila. 21— Allentown U.S. 

AMHERST (MASS.) COLLEGE. 

17 — Norwich Univ. — Harvard 17 3 — Dartmouth 15 

0— Springfield T.S. 0— Bowdoin 3 9— Williams 
3— Wesleyan Univ. 23— Worcester Poly. 

ASHEVILLE (N. C) SCHOOL. 

6— Asheville H.S. 4 70— Westminster Sen. 0— Davidson Coll. 2d O 

39— Lenoir Coll. 0— Asheville H.S. 5 0— Asheville H.S. 1 

0— Catawba Coll. 0— Mooney School 24 12L-Knoxville H.S. 

ATLANTIC CITY (N. J.) HIGH SCHOOL. 

12— Vineland H.S. 0— Brown Prep. 27— Pleasantville 

5— Penn. Inst, for 5— Atlantic City H.S. 17— Catholic H.S. 6 

Deaf Alumni 46— Camden H.S. 

17 — May's Land. F.A. 5 — Southern Manual 1 — Villanova Prep. 
0— Cent. H.S., Phila. 6 

BALTIMORE (MD.) CITY COLLEGE. 

4— McDonough School 0— Rock Hill Coll. 29 11— St. John's Coll. Res. 

8— Boys' Latin School 6— Gallaudet Coll. 12 3— Baltimore Poly. 
8— Havre de Grace HS. 

BATES COLLEGE, LEWISTON, ME. 

3 8— Maine Cent. Inst. 11— Fort McKinley 5 10— Univ. of Maine 

0— Harvard 22 6— N. Hamp. St. Coll. 6— Bowdoin 6 

6— Exeter 6 16— Hebron Acad. 3 0— Tufts 

BETHANY COLLEGE, BETHANY, W. VA. 

0— Geneva Coll. 8 23— Wellsburg A.C. 0— W. Virginia Wes. 

3— Wash. & Jefferson 5— Scio Coll. O— W. Virginia Univ. 8 
0— W. Virginia Univ. 36— Belmont Coll. 

BETHLEHEM (FA.) PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 

23 — Olivet Train. Sch. 20— Frank. & Marshall 6— Blair Acad. 

12— Easton H.S. 12— Lafayette Sophs. 17— Ursinus Reserves 6 
10 — Wilson Mil. Acad. 5 — Williamson Trades 

BINGHAM SCHOOL, ASHEVILLE, N. C. 

6— Asheville H.S. 11— King Coll. 39— Marvville Coll. O 

5— Catawba Coll. 89— Westminster Sch. 17— Mooney 
36 — Lenoir Coll. 10 — Davidson Reserves 3 



t\ Jt. ■ fe» ' 




1, J. Kelley; 2, Casey; 3, Town, Mgr.; 4, Beiinis. Coach; 5, Miller; t>, 

Murphy; 7, Gribbin; 8, Considine; 9, Tully; 10, Tighe; 11, E. Kelley; 12, 

Walsh; 13, Morris; 14, D. Bennis; 15, McCue, Capt. ; 1G, Murray; 17, Tucker. 

ST. JOSEPH'S COLLEGE, PHILADELPHIA. PA. 




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1, Duggan; 2, G. Carroll; 3, McCarthy; 4, O'Connor; 5, Schildgen; 0, Pen- 
rose; 7, Williams; 8, Murphy; 9, Coar; 10, Maynes, Mgr.; 11, V. Carroll; 
12, Boyle; 13, Lynch; 14, Guidone; 15, McLaughlin; 16, Burke; 17, McGeehan, 
Coach ; 18, Hughes; 19, Ferry; 20, Neis, Capt.; 21, Reeves; 22, McNeirney. 
VILLANOVA (PA.) PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 




1, Banes; 2, Hallowell: 3. Norton; 4, Kingsbury, Mgr.; 5, Coit; 6, Moore; 

7. Moody; 8, Schroeder; 9, Harvey; 10, Cogswell; 11, Price, Capt.: 12, 

Shakespeare; 13, Putnam; 14, Duff. Gilbert, Photo. 

ST. LUKE'S SCHOOL. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



249 



BLAIR HALL, BLAERSTOWN, N. J. 
6— Lafayette Fresh. 21— Seton Hall Coll. 
— Pennington Sein'y 10 — Peddie Inst. 
— Lawrencevilje 11 



— Bethlehem Prep. 6 
16 — Lafayette Sophs. 



BORDENTOWN (N. 
5 — Central. Man. Tr. 16 
— New Jersey State 5 



J.) MILITARY ACADEMY. 

15— Easton H.S. 0— Pennington S m'y 15 

— Montclair Acad. 21 0— Peddie Inst. 31 



BROWN PREPARATORY SCHOOL, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

— Germantown Acad. — St. Joseph's Coll. 2 24 — Frank. & Marshall O 

29— DeLancey 5— Beading H.S. 3 22— Wilmington U.S. 
0— Atlantic City H.S. 30— Southern H.S. 

BROWN UNIVERSITY, PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

31 — Norwich Univ. — Harvard Univ. 12 50 — Univ. of Vermont O 

5— Bhode Island State 27— Tufts College 9 49— Mass. Agri. Coll. 

0— Colgate Univ. 21 — Yale Univ. 15 — Carlisle Indians 6 
— Univ. of Penn. 20 



BUCHTEL COLLEGE, AKRON, OHIO. 

— Western Reserve 7 31 — Wooster 
3— Oberlin 5— Mt. Union 3 

41— Hiram 34— Heidelberg 5 



-Allegheny 6 
-Marietta 14 



BUCKNELL UNIVERSITY, LEWISBURG-, PA. 

12— Lock Haven Norm. 12— Univ. of W. Ya. 3— State College 43 



— Indians 45 
6 — Dickinson 9 



0— Lafayette 12 
6— Gettysburg 9 



CARLISLE (PA.) INDIAN SCHOOL 

53— Lebanon Yal. Coll. 29— Gettysburg 3 

6 — Villanova 
39 — Muhlenburg 
24: — Dickinson 
39— Bucknell 



— Syracuse 14 
— Princeton 6 
5 — Pennsylvania 17 
22 — Virginia 5 



18 — Swarthmore 22 



— Annapolis 6 
—Harvard Law 3 
12 — Johns Hopkins 
6 — Brown 15 



CARNEGIE TECHNICAL SCHOOLS, PITTSBURG, FA. 

— Wavnesburg Coll. 5 — Geneva Coll. — Lehigh Univ. 25 

0— State Coll. 61 0— Wash. & Jefferson 8 0— Univ. of Pittsb'g 35 
3— Grove City Coll. 16 0— Allegheny Coll. 27 

CASCADILLA SCHOOL, ITHACA, N. Y. 

17— Ithaca H.S. 15— Travis Prep. Sch. 10 0- 

0— Cornell Freshmen 22 46— Ovid H.S. 17- 
11— Auburn H.S. 



-Penn. Freshmen 39 
-Ithaca All-Stars 



CASE SCHOOL OF APPLIED SCIENCE, CLEVELAND, OHIO. 

3— Michigan 3 0— Oberlin 6 12— Mt. Union 

15 — Denison 3 14 — Ohio State 10 3— Western Beserve 
15 — Wooster 20 — Kenyon 

CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL, AKRON, OHIO. 

16 — Warren 8— B oven 12— Mansfield 

45 — East Liverpool 90 — Commerce 6 — Canton 3 

17— Massillon 

CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL, BUFFALO, N. Y. 

0— Hamburg H.S. 18 — Central Alumni 10 — Masten Park H.S. 1 

10— Springville H.S. 0— Lockport H.S. 0— Nichols School 12 

00— Angola H.S. 0— Technical H.S. 18 0— Lafayette Second 




1, Kemper, Coach; 2, McManiman; 3, Hall; 4, Guilano; 5, Lobert; 6, F. 
Cruikshank; 7, Best; 8. Blakonev; 9, Cameron; 10, Gordon; 11, Speiden, 
Capt.; 12, B. Cruikshank; 13, Richmond; 14, Roy. p 

BLAIR HALL. BLAIRSTOWN, N. J. 




1, H. Benedict, Mgr.; 2, Prof. Wilson, Asst. Coach; 3, W. A. Sawyer, Coach; 
4. Crammer; 5, Hilyard: 6. Rodgers; 7, Botlee: 8, Ellis; 9. Osgoodby; 10, 
Conroy; 11, Davies; 12, Smith; 13, Wevmer: 14. Hart; 15, Leutze; 16, 
Holmes; 17, Bills, Capt.; 18, Duffy; 19, Haines; 20, Baldwin. 
PENNINGTON CN. J.) SEMINARY. 




1, Prof. Lammert, Coach: 2, Capt. Jones, Ath. Dir. : 3, Reed: 4. Hipp; 5, 
.Tonkins; 6, Hetfley; 7. Rogers; 8, Jesler; 9, W. Walker; 10. Peterson: 11. 
Lamade; 12. Edsall; 13. Wallworth; 14. Renner; 15, Turner; 10, F. Walker; 
17, Keeler, Capt.; 18, Boggs: 19, Storer. 

WENONAII (N. J.) MILITARY ACADEMY. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 251 

CHESTNUT HILL ACADEMY, PHILADELPHIA, FA. 

— Haverford 17 — Episcopal 3 28 — Germantown 

6 — Bryn Athyn 6 — DeLancey 12 — St. Luke's 

— Penn Charter 23 — Alumni 5 

CITADEL MILITARY COLLEGE, CHARLESTON, S. C. 

11 — U. S. Navy Yard 0— Charleston Coll. 11 5 — Univ. of Florida 6 

0— Clemson 34 0— Mercer 22 6— Univ. of S. C. 

10— Wake Forest 6 

COLBY COLLEGE, WATERVILLE, ME. 

16 — Hebron 26 — Fort McKinley 10 5 — Bowdoin 6 

11— Rents Hill 0— Holy Cross 6 0— Maine 6 
0— Dartmouth 18 

COLGATE UNIVERSITY, HAMILTON, N. Y. 

78— Claikson Inst. T. 58— Middlebury 6— Rochester 5 

0— Brown 0— Yale IS 11— Syracuse 6 

0— Trinity 23 

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON, CHARLESTON, S. C. 

0— Univ. of So. Caro. 8 6— U.S.M.C. (Charleston 6— Davidson Coll. 27 

11— Citadel Yard) 0— Univ. of Florida 35 

CONNELLSVILLE (FA.) HIGH SCHOOL. 

12 — Alumni — Johnstown H.S. 5 38 — N. Kensington HS. 

21— Youngwood H.S. 38— Tarentun H.S. 0— Riskiminetas 26 
23— Irwin H.S. 

CONWAY HALL, CARLISLE, FA. 

— Harrisburg H.S. 3 46 — Shenandoah Valley — Indiana Normal 8 

35 — Harrisburg Tech. 35 Acad. 46 — Bucknell Acad. 

0— Penn. Freshmen 14 0— Hill School 6 3— Mercersburg 6 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY, ITHACA, N. Y. 

50— Hobart Coll. 47— St. Bonaventure IS— Chicago 

24 — Rensselaer Poly. 15 — Univ. of Vermont 5 6 — Univ. of Penn. 12 

— Oberlin 5 — Harvard 27 

DARTMOUTH COLLEGE, HANOVER, N. H. 

6— Mass. State Coll. 39— Williams 15— Amherst 3 

18— Colby 0— Princeton 6 0— Harvard 18 

33 — Univ. of Vermont 

DAVIDSON (N. C.) COLLEGE. 

18— Catawba Coll. 6— Univ. of N. Caro. 52— Univ. of S. Caro. 

57— Lenoir Coil/0 12— Wash. & Lee 14 32— Wake Forest 

6— V.P.I. 16 27— Charleston Coll. 5 

DELANCEY SCHOOL, PHILADELPHIA, FA. 

0— Radnor H.S. 0— Chestnut Hill 6 0— Penn Charter 28 

— St. Luke's 5 — Lower Merion HS. 11 — Episcopal Acad. 3 

— Brown 1'rep. 21 5 — Friends' Central 6 

DELAWARE COLLEGE, NEWARK, DEL. 

0— Williamson Tr. S. 14— Mt. St. Mary's 6 0— Muhlenburg 11 

5 — Haverford 5 — Swarthmore 27 

DENISON COLLEGE, GRANVILLE, OHIO. 

12 — Ohio 3 14 — Wesleyan 9 — Wooster 

— Kenyon 5 5 — State 5 3 — Western Reserve 6 

3 — Case 15 31 — Wittenberg O 12 — Cincinnati 2S 




1, C. Teevan; 2, Fitzsimmons ; 3, Farrell; 4, C. Byrana, Coach; 5, Rising; 6, 

Bals; 7, Gehr; 8, Sensbaeh; 9, Mergenthaler; 10, Stymer; 11, G. Teevan, 

Capt.; 12, Fahey; 13, Bird. Coe, Photo. 

FLATBUSH ATHLETIC CLUB. BROOKLYN. N. Y. 



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1, Lang; 2 1 , Humphreys; 3, Sargent; 4, Logan; 5, Midn. Richardson; 6, 
Williams; 7, Mellon: 8, Blank; 9, Comader; 10, Cummings; 11, Geiser; 12, 
Nanance; 13. Zwingle; 14. Sullivan; 15. Shemich. 
U. S. S. CONNECTICUT. 




1. L. Williams; 2, Daniels; 3, Wilcox; 4, Hurford: 5, Pedley; 6, Schwab; 7, 
Quirk: 8. Monroe. Coach; 9, Emigh; 10, Mahaffey; 11, Ruger, Capt.; 12, 
Hesney; 13, Parsons; 14, McCalman; 15, Carr; 16, O'Conon; 17, Bailey, Mgr.; 
IS, H: Williams. STARKEY SEMINARY. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



253 



DICKINSON COLLEGE, CARLISLE. FA. 

— Univ. of Penn. IS 9— Bucknell 6 12— St. John's 

O— Western Maryland 3 0— Frank. & Marshall 10 3 — Gettysburg 7 

— Indians 24 3 — Ursinus 46 — Lafayette 41 
14 — Lebanon Valley 

EASTERN COLLEGE. MANASSAS, VA. 

15— Gallaudet Coll. 22— Catholic Univ. 2 

0— A. & M. of N. C. 16 5— Rock Hill Coll. 6 



11— St. Vincent 



-Bowling Green H.S. 
-Columbus N.H.S. 



ERASMUS HALL HIGH SCHOOL, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

16— Rutgers 45— Commercial 5— X. Y. H.S. of Com. 

34— Stevens 29— New Haven 0— Boys' H.S. 5 

5— Adelphi 6— N. Y. Man. Train. 5— Polytechnic Prep. 

FOSTORIA (OHIO) HIGH SCHOOL. 

18— Defiance H.S. 33— Bradner H.S. 17- 

19— Mansfield H.S. 28— Lorain H.S. 5 11- 

0— Findlay H.S. 2 29— Findlay H.S. 

FRANKLIN AND MARSHALL COLLEGE, LANCASTER, FA. 

12— Williamson T.S. 6 0— Ursinus 20 12— Muhlenberg 

— Univ. of Penn. 17 10 — Dickinson 46 — Gallaudet 

0— Rutgers 0— Haverford 8— Gettysburg 9 

GALLAUDET COLLEGE, WASHINGTON, D. C 

0— Eastern Coll. 15 6— Mt. St. Joseph's 6 0— Frank. & Marshall 46 

18— Mt. Washington 12 , 18 — Baltimore City Coll. 6 0— Norfolk Blues 5 

GENEVA COLLEGE, BEAVER FALLS, FA. 

— Wash. & Jefferson 3 — Grove City 9 — Carnegie Tech. 6 

0— Allegheny Coll. 22 0— Grove City 3 

GEORGETOWN (D. C.) UNIVERSITY. 

55 — Seamen Gunners 52 — Wash. & Lee 

27— Washington Coll. 0— Univ. of Pittsburg 17 

0— A. & M. of N. C. 12— Univ. of N. Caro. 



15 — Univ. of Virginia 
14 — Virginia Mil. Inst. 6 
6— Lehigh 3 

GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY, ATLANTA, GA. 

57— Gordon Institute 36 — Univ. of Alabama 6 — Univ. of Georgia 11 

18 — U. of Chattanooga — Auburn 16 34 — Clemson 
46— Mercer Univ. 0— Vanderbilt 23 

GETTYSBURG (FA.) COLLEGE. 

11 — Middletown 3 — Carlisle Indians 29 9- 

— Univ. of Penn. 29 24 — Lebanon Valley 10- 

2— St. John's Coll. 0— Lafayette 21 9- 

GROVE CITY (FA.) COLLEGE. 

24— N. Brighton Schol. 6— Allegheny Coll. 6 

18— Oil City Y.M.C.A. 3— Geneva Coll. 

16— Carnegie Tech. 3 9 — Geneva Coll. 

HAMILTON COLLEGE, CLINTON, N. Y. 

20 — Clarkson Tech. 2 — Rochester 5 

0— Hobart 17 



-Bucknell 6 
-Dickinson 3 
-Frank. & Marshall I 



r6 — California Normal 
0— Westminster Coll. 11 



0— R. P. I. 12 



-St. Lawrence 5 
-Union 



HAMFDEN-SIDNEY (VA.) COLLEGE. 

— Va. Poly. Inst. 18 27 — Roanoke Coll. 

— Wash. & Lee 10 17 — William and Mary 6 
17— Univ. Coll. of Med. 



18— Richmond Coll. 
3— Randolph-Macon 10 



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1, Jordan; 2, Moulterer; 3, Hannigan; 4, Routh; 5, Tillman: 6, Duncan; 7, 
Mitchell; 8, McSorley; 9, Lieut. Bunker, Coach; 10, Packard. Capt. ; 11, 
McKeebey; 12, Regnier; 13, Martin; 14, Duquette; 15, Smith; 16, Coleman; 
17, Tracy; 18, Flannery; 19, McPeake; 20, Driscoll., 

FORT SLOCUM CN. Y.) TEAM. 




1, Haury, Coach; 2, Halsey; 3. Lloyd: 4. Simpson; 5, Hough; 6, Werchman; 
7, H. Mueller; S, Bruggy; 9, Blank; 10, Rankin; 11, VonLehm, Referee: 12. 
Boyd; 13. Leach; 14, VanHart; 15, Tichenor; 13. Wise; 17, N. Sanford: IS. 
Mueck; 19, Lang; 20, F. Sanford; 21, Beattie; 22. Dick, Mgr. ; 23, Malson, 
Capt.; 24, Sloane; 25, E. Mueller. 

TROJAN ATHLETIC CLUB, ELIZABETH. N. J. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



255 



HARRISBURG (PA.) HIGH SCHOOL. 

3— Conway Hall 13— Lebanon H.S. C 

5— York H.S. 0— Williamsport.H.S. 24 

6— Harrisburg Acad. 10— York H.S. 12 
5— Steelton H.S. 



0— Steelton H.S. 
G — Harrisburg Tech. 
H.S. 



0— Trinity 37 
— Ursinus 24 



16— Tome 
G — Hotchkiss 



HARRISBURG- (FA.) TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL. 

0— Conway Hall 35 18 — West Chester H.S. 23— Harrisburg Acad. 

11— Indian Third 5 32— Lebanon H.S. 0— Harrisburg Cent. 

18— York H.S. 12— Steelton H.S. 6 H.S. 6 

5— Steelton H.S. 8 

HARVARD UNIVERSITY, CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 

•22 — Bates 17 — Amherst 27 — Cornell 5 

32 — Bowel oin 12 — Brown 18 — Dartmouth 

21— Williams 6— West Point 0— Yale 

HAVERFORD (FA.) COLLEGE. 

17— Temple Coll. O 0— Rutgers Coll. 

5 — Delaware Coll. 5 0— Frank. & Marshall 

5 — Lehigh Univ. 5 — Johns Hopkins 15 

HILL SCHOOL, POTTSTOWN, FA. 

25 — Villanova Prep. 6 — Conway Hall 

— Princeton Prep. 6 24 — Haverford 

30 — Swarthmore Prep. 

HOLY CROSS COLLEGE, WORCESTER, MASS. 

— Yale 12 34 — Boston Coll. 3 — Worcester Poly. 

0— Springfield Tr. Sch. 0— Princeton 17 14— Tufts 
6— Colby 

HOWARD UNIVERSITY, WASHINGTON, D. C. 

16— Annapolis Team 39— Hampton Inst. IS— Tuskegee Inst. 
21 — Shaw Univ. 5— Lincoln Univ. 

INDIANA UNIVERSITY, BLOOMINGTON, IND. 

12 — DePauw Univ. 12 — Univ. of Wisconsin 3 — Univ. of Illinois 3 

6— Univ. of Chicago 34— Butler Coll. 15— Purdue Univ. 
33— Milliken Univ. ■■ - - 

JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY, BALTIMORE, MD. 

11 — Maryl'd Agri. Coll. 11 15 — Western Maryland 5 — Carlisle Indians 12 

— Stevens Inst. 2 15 — Haverford Coll. 5 9 — Washington Coll. 
26— Randolph-Macon 14— St. John's Coll. 

KENYON COLLEGE, GAMBIER, OHIO. 

0— Otterbein — Western Reserve IS 0— Case 20 

5 — Denison 0— Wooster 21 0— State 53 
0— Mount Union 20 2— Wesleyan 11 

LAFAYETTE COLLEGE, EASTON, FA. 

'31 — Bloomsburg 0-^P~rinceton 3 — Pennsylvania 18 

10 — Ursinus 20— Gettysburg 14 — Lehigh 

6 — Swarthmore 12 — Bucknell 41 — Dickinson 

LAFAYETTE HIGH SCHOOL, BUFFALO, N. Y. 

57— Batavia H.S. 11— Tonawanda H.S. O— Geneva H.S. 

41— Wacsaw H.S. 9— St. John's Mil. A. 6 19— Technical H.S. 

47 — Chamberlain M.A. 34— Hamburg H.S. — Masten Park H.S. S 
16— N. Tonawanda HS. 




1, Dr. Spaeth, Coach; 2, McGuire; 3, Miller; 4, Tenney; 5, Thompson; 6, H. 
Hart, Mgr.; 7. Stoll; 8, Clough; 9, Pettit; 10, Ricketts; 11, Hanibley: 12, 
Robinson; 13, Barrows; 14, Meriwether; 15, W. Hardee, Capt. ; 16, Lamnan; 
17, Brown. ASHEVILLE CN. C.) SCHOOL. 




1, Purcell; 2, Walton; 3, Tull; 4. Williams; 5. Brown; 6, Sneed; 7, McDonald; 

S. Starks: 9, Little; 10, Le Massena; 11, Hickman; 12, Angier; 13, Leak, 

Capt.; 14, Wright; 15. Capt. Norton, Coach. Ray, Photo. 

BINGHAM SCHOOL. ASHEVILLE, N. C. 





& % f % 


n 






7 8 II 


i 


*** . ..^ , m 



1 Hale, Coach; 2, Bleier; 3. Barden: 4. Booker; 5, OTonnell; 6, Cheshire; 

7 Heusner: 8, Brown; 9, Laurie, Capt.; 10, Gilman; 11, Weber; 12, Ishidsi; 

13. Barton; 14, Byrnes. Robinson. Photo, 

CASCADILLA SCHOOL, ITHACA. N. Y. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



257 



IAWSENCEVILI.E (N. 

— Northeast Manual 0— 

Train. Sch. 11- 
— Princeton Fresh. 9 



J.) SCHOOL 

Haverford School 
Blair Hall 



— Tome Institute 
— Mercersburg 28 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE, ANNVILLE, FA. 

0— Carlisle Indians 48 6 — Gettysburg 21 12— Indian (2d team) 18 

0— Swarthmore 27 6— Muhlenberg IS 0— Mt. St. Mary's 60 

13— Dickinson Coll. 18 

LEHIGH UNIVERSITY, SOUTH BETHLEHEM, FA. 

10— W. Maryland Coll. 0— Army 28 25— Carnegie Tech. 

O — Stevens Inst. 
0— Haverford Coll. 5 



-Lafayette Coll. 11 
-Georgetown Univ. 6 



12— Wenonah Mil. Acad. 
5 — Palmyra H.S. 
12— Radnor H.S. 



-Swarthmore Coll. 15 
0— Navy 30 

LOWER MERION (PA.) HIGH SCHOOL. 

— Villanova Prep. 5 6 — Norristown H.S. 

15— Media H.S. 14— Haverford Sch. 2d 

11 — DeLancey 17 — Tredyffrin-Easttown 

— Gerniantown Acad. 5 H.S. 

MANUAL TRAINING HIGH SCHOOL, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

16 — Stevens Prep. 6 — Brooklyn Poly. 11 12 — Brooklyn Prep. 

32— Flushing 2 70— N. Y. Mil. Acad. 0— Boys' High 3 

11— Commercial H.S. 0— Erasmus Hall 6 

MARIETTA (OHIO) COLLEGE. 



10— Univ. of W. Va. 
17 — Miami Univ. 



5 — Ohio North. Univ. 3 
11— Buchtel Coll. 22 



PARK 



12— Ohio Univ. 
45 — Muskingum Coll. 
8— W. Va. Wes. Coll. 3 

MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, COLLEGE 
MB. 

12— Central H.S. 
22— Richmond Coll. 
11 — Johns Hopkins 11 

MASSACHUSETTS 
MASS. 

— Rhode Island 
0— Dartmouth 6 
3— Trinity 15 



20— Catholic Univ. 
G— Geo. Wash. Univ. 
5 — Washington Coll. 

AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, AMHERST, 



— Virginia Mil. Inst. 8 
0— St. John's Coll. 6 
3— W. Maryland Coll. 17 



14 — Worcester P.I. 5 
2 — Univ. of Maine 29 
0— N. Hamp. State 



G— Tufts 7 

3— Springfield T.S. 15 

0— Brown 49 



MASTEIV J? ARK HIGH SCHOOL, BUFFALO, N. Y. 

23— Fredonia Normal 11— Nichols School 6 — Roch. East H.S. 

G— Hamburg H.S. 6— Technical H.S. 5 8— Lafavette H.S. 

12— N. Tonawanda HS. 12 1— Central H.S. 

MERCERSBURG (FA.) ACADEMY. 

21— Carlisle Indian 9 — Lafayette Scrubs 

Sevubs 17— Penn. Scrubs 2 

12— Steel ton A. C. G 6— Princeton Fresh. 6 



11 — Penn. Fresh. 12 
27 — Dawrenceville Sch. 
6— Conway Hall 3 



MIAMI UNIVERSITY, OXFORD, OHIO. 

5 — Wilmington — Cincinnati 3 19 — Wittenberg 



2— Central 12 0— Marietta 17 

0— DePauw 12 

MORRISTOWN (N. J.) SCHOOL. 

20— South Orange H.S. 0— Hackley 1G 



S — Newman O 
6— Uarteret 6 



0— St. Paul's 2G 



0— Butler 



6— Cornwall Heights 17 
— Kingsley 32 




1, Herman, Mgr.; 2, Nicholas; 3, Stauffer; 4, Halev; 5, Von Beregbey; 6„ 
Warlow; 7, Jaeger; 8, Hill, Coach; 9, Mnmma; 10, German; 11, Matter; 12. 
Phillipelli; 13, Gnough, Capt. ; 14, Bowman; 15, Charles; 16, Bingham; 17 r 
Craighead; 18, Sheffer; 19, Peters; 20, Jauss; 21, Grove; 22, Elscheid. 
HARRISBURG (PA.) TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL. 




1, D. Mahony, Coach; 2, Wagenhurst; 3, D. Hallman; 4, Williams; o, forger; 
6, Martin; 7, Mindenhall; 8, C. Tinkler, Mgr.; 9, Hunter; 10, Rambo; 11, N. 
Lanz, Capt.; 12, E. Hallman; 13, Easton; 14, Metzger; 15, Block. 

NORRISTOWN (PA.) HIGH SCHOOL. {r A 




I, Lovitt; 2, F. H. Reiter, Coach; 3, A. L. Russell, Phys. Dir.; 4, Albert; 
5, Weiss; 6, Barron; 7, Walters; 8, Maldonado, Capt.; 9, Wise; 10, Sleppy; 

II, Mc Arthur; 12, Cherrington; 13, Boden; 14, Kazmarek; 15, Swartz, Mgr.; 
16, Kuhn; 17, Foster. 

PENNSYLVANIA INSTITUTION FOR THE DEAF. MT. AIRY, PA. 



SPALDINGS OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 
MOUNT UNION COLLEGE, ALLIANCE, OHIO 



259 



— Hiram 

6 — Indiana 

15 — Kenyan 



3 — Buehtel 5 
11— Wooster 
11 — Geneva 11 



6 — Hiram 5 
0— Case 12 
34— Heidelberg 



MT ST. MARY'S COLLEGE, EMMITSBURG, MD. 

0— Indian Reserves 5— Mt. Wash. Club 62— Lebanon Val. .Coll . U 

0_Mt! St. Joseph's 0— W. Maryland Coll. 7 58— Frederick \MCA. 

6— Delaware Coll. 11 

MUHLENBERG COLLEGE, ALLENTOWN, PA. 
O Carlisle Indian* 39 11— Del. State Coll. 11— Wyoming Sem'y 18 

^Williamson T S. O-Frank. & Marsh. 12 11-Carlisle Ind. Res. 6 

40 — Lebanon \ al. Coll. 6 

MUSKINGUM COLLEGE, NEW CONCORD, OHIO 



16_Scio Coll. 6 
— Marietta 45 



0— Ohio Wesleyan 37 
— Ohio Univ. 



15 — Rutgers 8 
6 — Trinity 12 



— Geneva 17 

— Ohio Northern U. 16 

N. Y. 

6 — Wesleyan 9 
0— Navy 9 



NEW YORK UNIVERSITY, NEW YORK, 

— Princeton 12 
3— Williams 3 
17 — Stevens 6 

NICHOLS SCHOOL, BUFFALO, N. Y. 

31— Angola H.S. 0— Masten Park H.S. 11 

0— ,N. Tonawanda HSi. 2S 0— Dunkirk H.S. 6 
29— Niagara Falls H.S. 18— Springville H.S. 

NORRISTOWN (FA.) HIGH SCHOOL. 

16— Media H.S. 0— Phoenix ville H.S. 

12— Chester H.S. 6 0— Reading H.S. o 

6 — Lower Merion HS. 6 

NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL 
COLLEGE, WEST RALEIGH, N. C 

0— Georgetown Univ. 22— Eastern Coll. 2S- 

6— Villanova Coll. 6 50— Richmond Coll. o- 

NORTH TONAWANDA (N. Y.) HIGH SCHOOL. 
48— Technical 3 0— Lafayette H.S. 16 0— Erie 20 

IfcxicK School 53-Albion H.S. 6-Tonawanda H.S. 

12— Masten Park H.S. 12 
NORWICH UNIVERSITY, NORTHFIELD, VT. 



— Technical H.S. 25 
12— Central H.S. 



6 — Wilmington 
12 — Southern Man. Tr. 

AND MECHANICAL 



-Wake Forest Coll. 3 
-Virginia Poly. 3 



32 — St. Michael's Coll. 
— Amherst 17 
0— Brown 31 



— Wesleyan 17 
— Trinity 9 
17 — Univ. of Vermont 



22 — Conn. Agri. Coll. 
29— Middlebury Coll. 5 



46 — Heidelberg Univ. 
0— Ohio State Univ. 



OBERLIN (OHIO) COLLEGE. 

0— Buehtel Coll. 3 43— Hiram Coll. 

0— Cornell Univ. 6— Case S. of Ap. Sci. 

20— Univ. of Wooster 8— Western Res. Univ. 6 
OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY, COLUMBUS, OHIO. 

14-Otterbein 5 3-Michigan 3 S~ Oblrlta O^** ° 

6 o_ Wittenberg 5— Denison o 0— Obeilm O 

^-Cincinnati 10-Case Coll. 14 3o-Kenyon 

6 — Western Reserve 

OHIO WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY, DELAWARE, OHIO. 

85-Findlay Coll. 39-Wittenberg Coll ^-Kenyon Coll. 2 

40_Antioch Coll. 9— Denison Univ. 14 0— Ohio State b 

2-Westem Res. Univ. 9 37-Muskingum Coll. 29-Univ. of Wooster 







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1, H. Waterman; 2, Cross; 3, Wheeler; 4, Marsh; 5, A. Waterman; 6, Mead 
Mgr. ; 7, Pratt; 8, R. McOrmond, Coach; 9, Knight; 10, Day; 11, Havemeyei 
12, Metcalfe; 13. Cable; 14. Barker; 15. Evans. 

CHOATE SCHOOL. WALLINGFORD. CONN. 




1, Weeden; 2, Hughes, Coach; 3, Bolster; 4, Haskell; 5, Taylor; 6, Ellis; 7, 

Thompson, Capt. ; 8. Miner; 9," Wentworth; 10, Crosbv; 11, Messer; 12, 

Knowlton; 13, Eckles; 14, Marrion; 15, Adams. Nyatt, Photo 

BRATTLEBORO (VT.) HIGH SCHOOL. * 




1, Blue; 2, Council; 3, Carroll; 4, Jim Barrett, Coach; 5, Thompson;. 6. 
Moriarity; 7, Dugan; 8, Clifford, Asst. Mgr.; 9, Rice; 10, J. Barrett; 11, 
Navin; 12, F. Barrett. Capt.; 13, Romberg; 14, O'Brien; 15. Howard; 16. 
Moroney; 17, Terenzini; 18, McGarrity; 19. Tighe. Baldwin, Photo. 

ST. PETERS ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION, RUTLAND. VT. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDS. 261 

PAWLING (N. Y.) SCHOOL. 

16— Taft School 43— Pittsfield H.S. 16— Gunnery School 

68— Albany H.S. 34— Eastman's Bus. C. 5— Hotchkiss School 6 

PEDDIE INSTITUTE, HIGHTSTOWN, N. J. 

17— New Jersey State ?>— Wilson Mil. Acad. 0— Blair Acad. 10 
23— B'klyn Poly. Prep. 0— Barriuger H.S. 

PENN CHARTER SCHOOL, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

32— St. Luke's 0— Friends' Central 6— Swarthmore 11 

0— Chestnut Hill 23 — Episcopal 14 9— Germantown 6 
3— Penn. Inst, for Deaf 28— DeLancey 

PENNINGTON (N. J.) SEMINARY. 

22— Princeton H.S. 52— Plainfield H.S. 6 — Perkiomen Sem'y 16 

— Blair Acad. 2 — Villanova Prep. 15 — Bordentown. Mil. 

PENNSYLVANIA INSTITUTION POR THE DEAP AND DUMB, 
MT. AIRY, PHILADELPHIA, FA. 

0— Central H.S. 34 0— Pen Charter 3 5— Williamson Res. 

0— Atlantic City H.S. 5 5— Central Man. Train. 0— St. Joseph's Coll. 53 

7— Southern Man. Train. H.S. 12 16 — Mt. Airy A. A. 
H.S. 11 

PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE, STATE COLLEGE, PA. 

58 — Harrisburg A.C. — Univ. of Penn. 10 43 — Bucknell 3 

61— Carnegie Tech. Sch. 0— Villanova — Univ. of Pittsburg 11 

45— Sterling A.C. 34— St. Bona venture 

PERKIOMEN SEMINARY, PENNSBURG, PA. 

— Allentown 13 — Central Man. Train. 25 — Farm School 

0— Swarthmore 3 H.S. 12 16 — Phoenixville H.S. 5 
16— Pennington 0— N. E. Manual 2 

PHILLIPS ACADEMY, ANDOVER, MASS. 

8 — St. Alphonsus A. A. 6 11 — Boston Coll. 5 — Harvard Fresh. 

43 — Lowell Textile 12 — Gushing Acad. 0— Yale Freshmen 6 

2 — Dartmouth Fresh. 9 — Harvard Second 21 — Exeter 

PHILLIPS EXETER ACADEMY, EXETER, N. H. 

28 — Brewster Acad. 2 — Bowdoin Coll. 14 — Harvard Fresh. 

12 — Cusbing Acad. 5 — Princeton Fresh. — Yale Freshmen 

6 — Bates 6 — Penn. Freshmen — Asdover 21 

PINGRY SCHOOL, ELIZABETH, N. J. 

6— Roselle H.S. 94 — Trinity School 30— Carteret Acad. 

6 — Horace Mann — Kingsley School 6 9 — Battin H.S. 
58— Leak School 12— Rutgers Prep. 5 

PIQUA (OHIO) HIGH SCHOOL. 

19— Lima H.S. 16— Urbana 15— Lima 

5— Steele 50 — Sidney 26— Urbana 
9— Sidney 

PITTSBURG (PA.) HIGH SCHOOL. 

14 — Washington H.S. 31— W. & J. Acad. 25— Johnstown H.S. 

29— East Liberty Acad. 6 — Greensburg H.S. 11 12 — Shadyside 
41— Sharon H.S. 

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY. 

18— Stevens 3— Lafayette 17— Holy Cross 

36— Villanova 6 — Carlisle 3 — Yale 5 
12— New York Univ. 6— Dartmouth 



262 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY FRESHMEN. 

11 — Lawrenceviile 6 — Mercersburg »; 6 — Yale Freshmen 

0— Exeter 0— Harvard Freshmen 3 

PURDUE UNIVERSITY, LAFAYETTE, IND. 

0— Wabash 3 0— Illinois 11 5— Chicago 14 

— Iowa 16 11 — DePauw 6 3 — Indiana 15 

RADNOR (PA.) HIGH SCHOOL. 

— Swarthmore Prep. 11 0— Episcopal 9 23— Cheltenham H.S. 

0— Friends' Central 0— Lansdowne H.S. 0— Bryn Athyn 12 

— DeLancey 3 — Tredyffrin-Easttown 0— Lower Merion HS. 12 

RANDOLPH-MACON COLLEGE, ASHLAND, VA. 

— Univ. of Virginia 17 — Johns Hopkins 22 10 — Hampden-Sidnev 3 

0— Richmond Coll. 5 2— Univ. Coll. of Med. 8 11— Richmond Coll. 

6— Fredericksb'g Coll. 11— Win. and Mary 2 

RENSSELAER POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, TROY, N. Y. 

0— Williams 0— Worcester 8 — Rochester 

0— Cornell 21 12— Hamilton 31— Middlebnry G 

5— Hobart 6 0— Stevens 12 

RHODE ISLAND STATE COLLEGE, KINGSTON, R. I. 

0— Mass. Agri. Coll. 23 — St. Andrews 19 — Worcester Poly. 

5— Tufts 33— Conn. Agri. Coll. 6— X. Hamp. State 

— Brown 5 

ROANOKE COLLEGE, SALEM, VA. 

0— Wash, and Lee U. 13 10— St. Vincent 18--Staunton Mil. Acad. S 

0— Univ. of Virginia 21 12— Hainpden-Sidney 36 — Dublin Inst. 

ROCK HILL COLLEGE, ELLICOTT CITY, MD. 

0— Washington Coll. 2 29— Baltimore City Coll. 0— Baltimore Poly. 16 
21— Fredericksb'g Coll. 6 31— Catholic Univ. 6— Eastern Coll. 5 

0— Richmond Coll. 

ROLLINS COLLEGE, WINTER PARK, FLA. 

— Orlando — Summerlin Inst. 5 — Univ. of Florida 34 

Or— Columbia Coll. 6 6— Summerlin Inst. 6 0— Tampa 2 

15— Orlando 3 

RUTGERS COLLEGE, NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J. 

0— Frank. & Marshall 0— Haverford 5— Washington 6 

— Navy 8 — New York Univ. 15 8 — Stevens Inst. 6 

21 — Swarthmore 6 17 — St. Lawrence Univ. 

SCIO (OHIO) COLLEGE. 

6— Muskigum 16 58— Carrollton 36— West Lafayette 

— Bethany 5 15 — Magnolia 6 

SPRINGFIELD (MASS.) TRAINING SCHOOL. 

16— Conn. Agri. Coll. 0— Holy Cross Coll. 0— West Point 5 

0— Amherst Coll. 5— Tufts Coll. 15— Mass. Agri. Coll. 3 

6— Worcester Poly. 

STARKEY SEMINARY. 

— Elmira Free Acad. 11 — Binghamton Cent. 11 — Penn Yan Acad. 

0— Cornell Freshmen 47 H.S. 45 21— Penn Yan Acad. 

11— Waterloo H.S. 6— Corning Nor. H.S. 3 0— Elmira Free Acad. 5 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



263 



STEVENS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, HOBOKEN, N. J. 

0— Princeton 18 5— New York Univ. 17 0— Swarthniore 2G 

— Lehigh — Union Coll. 6 — Rutgers 8 

2 — Johns Hopkins 12 — Rensselaer Poly. 

ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE, ANNAPOLIS, MD. 

O— U. S. Naval Acad. 16 0— Geo. Wash. Univ. 0— Johns Hopkins 14 
0— Gettysburg Coll. 2 0— Virginia Mil. Inst. 22 6— Maryland Agri. C. 

0— Univ. of Virginia 29 0— Dickinson 12 42— Penn. Mil. Coll. 

ST. JOHNSVILLE (N. Y.) HIGH SCHOOL. 

5 — Amsterdam IT — Little Falls 29 — Dolgeville 

5— Dolgeville 5— Ilion 

ST. JOSEPH'S COLLEGE, PHILADELPHIA, FA. 

9— N. E. Man. Tr. HS. 9 6— Central Man. Tr. 12 53— Penn. Inst, for Deaf 
8— Catholic H.S. 21— Fordham 5 



ST. LAWRENCE UNIVERSITY, CANTON, N. Y. 

0— Univ. of Vermont 6 12— Middlebury Coll. 0— Rutgers 17 

16— St. Michaels' Coll. 5— Hamilton 

ST. LOUIS (MO.) UNIVERSITY. 

25— Shurtleff Coll. 0— Wabash Coll. 10 

22— Cape Giradeau N. 19— Haskell Indians 
3— Mo. Sch. of Mines 18— Drury Coll. 6 

ST. LUKE'S SCHOOL, WAYNE, FA. 

— Penn Charter 12 5 — Germantown Acad. 5 — Episcopal 3 

5 — DeLancey 0— Yeates 0— Chestnut Hill 12 

0— Bryn Athyn 6 



9 — Kentucky Univ. O 
3 — Missouri Univ. 
— Syracuse Univ. 6 



ST. MARY'S INSTITUTE, DAYTON, OHIO. 



64 — Columbus Deaf 

Mutes 
29 — Earlham Reserves 



45- 
10- 



-St. Xavier's 3 
-Antioch Coll. 



5— St. Xavier's 6 
22— St. Patrick's 6 



ST. PETER'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION, RUTLAND, VT. 

11 — Troy Conf . Acad. 6 20 — Vergennes 11 — Independents 

6 — Independents 5 — Vergennes 7 35 — Northern Vt. Ind. 5 
16 — Bennington 

ST. THOMAS' COLLEGE, SCRANTON, FA. 

34— Scranton Bus. Coll. 15— Taylor H.S. 0— Wilkes-Barre HS. 15 
— Dunmore H.S. 15 5 — Lack. Bus. Coll. 



SWARTHMORE (FA.) COLLEGE. 

47 — Lebanon Valley 27 — Delaware 

0— Lafayette 6 15— Lehigh 8 
5 — Rutgers 21 — Ursinus 6 

SWARTHMORE (FA.) PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 

11— Radnor H.S. 6— Tome Inst. 17 11— Penn Charter 6 

3— Perkiomen 21 — West Chester H.S. — Villanova Prep- 2 
0— Hill School 30 — Haverford School 

SYRACUSE (N. Y.) UNIVERSITY. 

0— St. Bonaventure 12— Hobart 5 
6— Yale 12 O— Michigan 11 

6 — Rochester 3 — Vermont 

14 — Carlisle Indians 



26— Stevens 
22— Bucknell 18 



6— Colgate 11 
— Illinois 3 
6 — St. Louis 



264 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



TAPT SCHOOL, WATEBTOWN, CONN. 

— Pawling 17 — Riverview 5 5 — Mackenzie 

5— Waterbury H.S. 35— Haekley 11— Cheshire 

11 — Gunnery 5 26 — Meriden H.S. 10— Poinfret 3 

TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL, BUFFALO, N. Y. 

3— N. Tonawanda HS. 48 6— Springville H.S. 10 25— Nichols School 
8— Dunkirk H.S. 6 5— Masten Park H.S. 0— Lockport H.S. 20 

0— Erie H.S. 32 IS— Central H.S. 0— Lafayette H.S. 10 

THOS. S. CLASKSON SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY, POTSDAM, 
N. Y. 



0— Hamilton Coll. 20 
6— All-rotsdam 



0— Colgate Univ. 78 



0— St. Michael's Coll. 



TONAWANDA (N. Y.) HIGH SCHOOL. 

28— Alden H.S. 38— Lackawanna H.S. 

33— Albion H.S. 0— Lafayette H.S. 1 

0— Erie H.S. 15 (forfeit) 

TRENTON (N. J.) HIGH SCHOOL. 

32 — N. Brunswick H.S. — Rutgers Prep. 6 

6— West Chester H.S. 5 0— Roman Cath. H.S. 
13— Rider, Moore & 6— Camden H.S. 

Stewart Bus. C. 



29- 
0- 



13- 



-Warsaw U.S. 
-North Tonawanda 
H.S. 6 



-Penn. R.R. Car 

Shops O 
-State Normal Sch. 10 



TRINITY COLLEGE, HARTFORD, CONN. 

23— Worcester Poly. 9— Norwich Univ. 37— Haverford Coll. 

15 — Mass. State Coll. 3 5— Wesleyan 0— West Point 17 
23— Colgate 12— New York Univ. 6 

TUFTS COLLEGE, MEDFORD, MASS. 

— Rhode Island State 5 6 — Univ. of Maine 14 7 — Mass. Aggies 6 

0— Yale 17 0— Springfiold Tr. S. 5 0— Bates 

— West Point 24 9 — Brown 27 0— Holy Cross 14 



UNION UNIVERSITY, SCHENECTADY, N. Y. 

0— Williams '29 0— Wesleyan 6 0— Hobart 5 

17— Micldlebury 5 9— Stevens 0— Hamilton 

0— Rochester 8 

UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY, WEST POINT, N. Y. 

24 — Tufts 0— Harvard 6 17— Trinity 

9— Yale 3 5— Springfield Tr. S. 0— Navy 3 

28— Lehigh 13— Yillanova 

UNITED STATES NAVAL ACADEMY, ANNAPOLIS, MD. 

16— St. John's Coll. 3 — Yirginia Poly. 6— Carlisle Indians 

— Rutgers 17— Western Reserve 9 — New York Univ. 



15— Wash. & Jefferson 30— Lehigh 

UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO. 

0— Indiana Univ. 6 0— Univ. of Minn. 24 

— Univ. of Illinois 3 14 — Purdue Univ. 5 

10 — Northwestern Univ. 



3— Army 



0— Cornell Univ. 18 
0— Univ. of Wis. 10 



UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI, CINCINNATI, OHIO. 

16 — Transvlvania Univ. 20 — Earlham Coll. 6 — Otterbein Univ. 12 

0— Ohio State Univ. 23 3— Miami Univ. 38— Antioch 

8 — Wittenberg — Ceatral Univ. 12 28 — Dennison Univ. 12 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 265 

UNIVERSITY OP ILLINOIS, UBBANA, ILL. 

13 — Millikin Univ. 11— Purdue 27 — Northwestern 

29 — Drake 3 — Indiana 3 — Syracuse 
3— Chicago 
UNIVERSITY OP MAINE, ORONO, ME. 

6— Bangor H.S. 14— Tufts 6 6— Colby 

17 — port McKinley 29— Mass. Aggies 2 0— Bowdoin 
— Univ. of Vermont — Bates 10 

UNIVERSITY OP MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, MICH. 

3 Case 3 3 — Ohio State Univ. 3 — Pennsylvania v. 

6 — Mich. Agri. Coll. 3 11 — Syracuse 6 — Minnesota 

UNIVERSITY OP MINNESOTA. 

34 — Lawrence 27 — Nebraska 28 — Wisconsin . 

17_South Dakota 24 — Chicago — Michigan 6 
49 — Ames 

UNIVERSITY OP PENNSYLVANIA, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

5— Ursinus 8 39— West Virginia 18 — Lafayette 

23 — Dickinson 20 — Brown — Michigan 

29— Gettysburg 10— Penn. State Coll. 12— Cornell 6 

21 — Frank. & Marshall 17— Carlisle Indians 5 

UNIVERSITY OP PITTSBURG. 

36 — Ohio North. Univ. 17 — Georgetown 14 — Wash. & Jefferson 

IS— Westminster Coll. 71 — Ohio Univ. 35 — Carnegie Tech. 

46— Waynesburg Coll. 38— W. Va. Univ. 11— Penn. State 

UNIVERSITY OP SOUTH CAROLINA, COLUMBIA, S. C. 

8— Coll. of Charleston 14— Augusta Med. Coll. 6— Univ. of N. Caro. 29 
33— Lenoir Coll. — Clemson 24 6— Wake Forest Coll. 

0— Citadel 5 0— Davidson 53 

UNIVERSITY OP THE SOUTH, SEWANEE, TENN. 

53— Sewanee Mil. Acad. — Central Univ. 19 15 — Univ. of Georgia 12 

27— Anderson T.S. 22— Morgan 30— Univ. of Alabama 

95 — Tenn. Mil. Inst. 6 — Univ. of Memphis 6 — Vanderbilt Univ. 23 

31 — Louisiana State U. 5 

UNIVERSITY OP VERMONT, BURLINGTON, VT. 

6 — St. Lawrence Univ. 5 — Cornell 15 — Syracuse 3 

— Univ. of Maine — Norwich Univ. 17 — Brown 50 

0— Dartmouth 33 

UNIVERSITY OP VIRGINIA, CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA. 

10 — Wm. and Mary 30 — Virginia Mil. Inst. 5 — Carlisle Indians 22 

22— Randolph-Macon 24— Roanoke Coll. 7— Carolina 

24— St. John's Coll. 0— Georgetown 15 

UNIVERSITY OP WISCONSIN, MADISON, WIS. 

6 — Lawrence 6 3 — Indiana 12 10 — Chicago 

— Northwestern — Minnesota 28 

UNIVERSITY OP WOOSTER, WOOSTER, OHIO. 

32— New Phil. 0— Oberlin 20 0— Mount Union 11 

— Western Reserve 15 — Case 15 — Denison 

0— Buchtel 31 21— Kenyon 0— Wesleyan 29 

URSINUS COLLEGE, COLLEGEVILLE, PA. 

8 — Pennsylvania 5 20 — Frank. & Marshall 6 — Swarthmore 

— Lafayette 10 46 — Dickinson 3 24 — Haverf ord O 

53— Temple 

£ 



266 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY, NASHVILLE, TENN. 

34— Mooney School 18 — Univ. of Tennessee 23— Louisiana State U. 

23— Rose Poly. Inst. 0— Yale 23— Sewanee 6 

14— Castle Heights S. 9— Univ. of Miss. 2 

VILLANOVA (FA.) COLLECrE. 

0— Carlisle 6 6— A. and M. G 0— West Point 13 

0— Princeton 36 0— Penn. State 0— Wash. & Jefferson 9 

VILLANOVA (FA.) PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 

0— Hill School 25 3— Williamson School 11 11— St. Joseph's 

5 — Lower Merion — Pennington Sem'y 2 2 — Swarthmore Prep. 

6— Central Man. TS. 20 5— Penn. Mil. Coll. 

VIRGINIA MILITARY INSTITUTE, LEXINGTON, VA. 

— Univ. of N. Caro. 6 — Univ. of Virginia 22 8 — Maryland Aggies 

0— Norfolk Blues 22— St. John's Coll. 6— Georgetown 14 

33— Wm. and Mary 

VIRGINIA FOLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, BLACKSBURG, VA. 

18— Hapden-Sidney 0— Navy 3 18— Geo. Wash. Univ. 5 

16— Davidson Coil. 6 23— Wash. & Lee 3— A. & M., N. C. 5 

13— Western Maryland 20 — Univ. of N. Caro. 

WASHINGTON AND JEFFERSON COLLEGE, WASHINGTON, 
FA. 

— Bethany 3 — Westminster 1 — Pittsburg 14 

— Geneva 8 — Carnegie Tech. 9 — Yillanova 

— Navy 15 41 — Waynesburg 

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY, ST. LOUIS, MO. 

G— Shurtleff 11 32— Drury G 3— Missouri Univ. 2T 

31 — Westminster — Arkansas Univ. 50 — Iowa Univ. 38 

6— Rose Poly. 

WELLSTON (OHIO) HIGH SCHOOL. 

20— I ronton U.S. 8— Athens H.S. 5— I ronton H.S. 

0— Portmouth H.S. 21— Circleville H.S. S 25— Blanchester H.S. 5 

WENONAH (N. J.) MILITARY ACADEMY. 

11 — Glassboro H.S. 58— Mavs Landing 49— Rider, Moore & 

55— St. John's Acad. 0— Lower Merion HS. 12 Stewart School 

28— Phila. Coll. of Phar. 56— Bordentown 34— Pleasantville 

WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY, MIDDLETOWN, CONN. 

0— Yale 22 17— Norwich 0— Williams 

30— Conn. Agri. Coll. 6 — Union 9— New York Univ. 6 

G— Amherst 3 0— Trinity 5 0— Bowdoin 5 

WESTERN MARYLAND COLLEGE, WESTMINSTER, MD, 

5— Dickinson 10— Yisnlia A.C. 3— Frederick 

0— Lehigh 10 5— Johns Hopkins 15 17— Maryl'd Agri. Coll. 3 

0— V. P. I. 14 7— Mt. St. Mary's Coll. 

WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY, CLEVELAND, OHIO. 

7— Buchtel Coll. 0— Ohio State Univ. G 6— Oberlin Coll. S 

15— Woostcr Univ. 18— Kenyon Coll. 6— Denison Univ. 3 

2 — Ohio Wes. Univ. 9 0— Naval Academy 17 — Case School 3 

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, MORGANTOWN, W. VA. 

6— Westminster Coll. 0— Bucknell Coll. 12 0— Univ. of Pittsb'g 36 

0— Univ. of Pa. 38 6— Marietta Coll. 10 8— Bethany Coll. 

0— Bethany Coll. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 267 

WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE, BUCKHANNON. 
W. VA. 

ll_Glenville Norm. 3— Marietta Coll. S 0— Bethany Coll. 

11 — Fairmont Norm. 12 — Morris Harvey C. — Waynesburg Coll. 6 
5— Marshall Coll. 

WESTMINSTER COLLEGE, NEW WILMINGTON, PA. 

0— W. Virginia Univ. 6 1— Wash. & Jefferson 6— Allegheny 3 
0— Univ. of Pittsb'g 18 (forfeit) 0— Hiram 

29 — California Normal 17— Waynesburg 11 — Grove City 

11— Geneva 2 

WILXES-BARRE (FA.) HIGH SCHOOL. 

9 — Berwick H.S. — Wyoming Sem'y 12 6 — Keystone >kA.cad. 

G— Tunkhannock 6— Scranton 17— St. Thomas' Coll. 
6 — Scranton 5 

WILLIAMS COLLEGE, WILLIAMSTOWN, MASS. 

— Rensselaer Poly. 3 — New York Univ. 3 — Wesleyan 

29— Union — Dartmouth 39 — Amherst 9 

0— Harvard 21 

WILLIAMSFORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 

6— Bellefonte Acad. 8 0— Cook Acad. 49 6— Wyoming Sem'y 12 

6 — Bloomsburg Norm. — Lock Haven Norm. 6 0— Bucknell A.C. 29 

WILLIAMSFORT (FA.) HIGH SCHOOL. 

12— Jersey Shore H.S. 0— Mansfield Norm. 28 5— Steelton H.S. 

— Bloomsburg Norm. 20 42 — Elmira Free Acad. — Lock Haven 
15— Sunbiiry H.S. 24— Harrisburg H.S. 

WILLIAMSON SCHOOL, PHILADELPHIA, FA. 

6— Frank. & Marshall 12 11— Yillanova Prep. 3 0— Central H.S. 17 

— Delaware Coll. 5— Penn. Mil. Coll. — Bethlehem Prep. 

0— Muhlenberg Coll. 

WILMINGTON (OHIO) COLLEGE. 

8— Wittenberg 0— Antioch 46 — St. Xavier 

— Miami 5 — Earlham 17 9 — Antioch 5 
6— Ohio Univ. 

WITTENBERG COLLEGE, SPRINGFIELD, OHIO. 

— Wilmington 8 — Cincinnati 8 10 — Miami 19 

0— State 62 5— Earlham 3 . 0— Oberlin 29 

0— Wesleyan 39 0— Denison 31 2— Heidelberg 

WORCESTER (MASS.) POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE. 

— Trinity 17 S— Rensselaer Poly. — Rhode Isl'd State 19 

— Springfield Tr. Sch. 5 0— Amherst 23 — Holv Cross 

5— Mass. State Coll. 14 

WYOMING SEMINARY, KINGSTON, FA. 

18 — Ashley — Cornell Freshmen 17 3 — Bloomsburg Norm. 6 

40 — Berwick H.S. 12 — Wilkes-Barre H.S. 18 — Muhlenburg 11 

5 — East Stroudsburg 6 — Dickinson Sem'y 12 6 — Lafavette Res. 6 

N.S. 

YALE UNIVERSITY, NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

22— Wesleyan 3— West Point 9 0— Brown 21 

12 — Syracuse 6 — Vanderbilt 5 — Princeton 3 

17— Tufts 16— Colgate 0— narvard 

12— Holy Cross O 

YEATES SCHOOL, LANCASTER, FA. 

11— Stevens Ind. Sch. 3 0— Phila. Divinity 18 lo -Ephrata H.S. 

— Millersville Norm. 9 — St. Luke's 69— Cedarcroft School 
33— Columbia H.S. 



268 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



Schedules for 1911 



SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23. 
Bates ts. New Hampshire, at Durham. Rens. P.I. vs. Clarkson Tech., at Troy. 



Carlisle vs. Lebanon Vail., at Carlisle. 
Colby vs. Hebron Acad., at Waterville. 
Conn. Agri. C. vs. Rockville, at Storrs. 
Gettysb'g vs. Middlet'n, at Gettysb'g. 
Holy Cross vs. Boston, at Worcester. 
Lafay'te vs. Bl'burg S.N.S., at Easton. 
Mass. Agri. Coll. vs. R.I., at Amherst. 
Monm'th Coll. vs. Mon'th HS., at Man. 
Ohio Wes. vs. Alumni, at Delaware. 



St. Louis U. vs. Shurtleff, at St. L. 
St. Law. U. vs. St. Mich., at Canton. 
U. of Me. vs. Ft. McKinley, at Orono. 
U. of Va. vs. Hamp.-Sid., at Char'v'le. 
U. of Wyo. vs. Chey. HS., at Laramie. 
Ursin. vs. Steel ton MCA., at Ursinus. 
W. Md. vs. Fred'k, at Westminster. 
W. Res. vs. Mt. Union, at Cleveland. 
William Jewell vs. Ottawa, at Ottawa. 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27. 
Carlisle vs. Muhlenburg. at Carlisle. ]Lehigh vs. LebanonYall., at__Bethl'm. 
Cornell vs. Allegheny, at Ithaca. 
Dartmouth vs. Norwich, at Hanover. 



ITaft S, vs. Mer. H.S., at Watertown. 



FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29. 
Ct. U. of la. vs. Highl'd Pk., at H.P. 

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 30. 
Amherst vs. Springfield T.S.. at Am. .Pacific Univ. vs. Alumni, at For. Gr. 
Brown vs. New Hamp., at Providence. 'Penna. State vs. Geneva, at St. Coll. 
Buchtel vs. Muskingum, at Akron. Princeton vs. Stevens, at Princeton. 

Bucknell vs. Lock H. N., at Lewisb'g. t Rens. Poly. vs. Williams, at Wms't'n. 
Carlisle vs. Dickinson, at Carlisle. 'Richmond vs. Md. Ag. Coll., at Rich. 

Citadel vs. U. S. N. Y., at Charlest'n.'R. I. State vs. U. of Me., at Orono. 
Colby vs. Kents Hill, at Waterville. I Roanoke vs. Dublin Inst., at Salem. 



Cornell vs. Colgate, at Ithaca. 
Dartmouth vs. Mass. Agri., at Han'r. 
Davidson vs. Catawba, at Davidson. 
DePauw vs. Indiana, at Bloomington. 
Fairmount vs. Cooper, at Wichita. 



jScio vs. Mt. Union, at Alliance. 
(Southern U. vs. Selma, at Greensboro. 
jSt. John's vs. Rock H., at Annapolis. 
iSt. Louis vs. Cape Gir. Nor., at St. L. 
Syracuse vs. Hobart. at Syracuse. 



Georgetown vs. Ran. -Macon, at Wash. iTaft Sch. vs. Kent Sch., at Watert'n 



Hamilton vs. Clarkson T.. at Clinton, 
Hamp.-Sid. vs. Ya. P. I., at Blacksb'g. 
Harvard vs. Bates, at Cambridge. 
Haverf'd vs. Phila. C. of P., at Hav. 
Iowa St. Coll. vs. Coe Coll.. at Ames. 
Kan. S. Coll. vs. Southw'n, at Manh'n. 
Lafayette vs. Ursinus, at Easton. 
Lehigh vs. West. Md., at Bethlehem. 
Mercersb'g vs. Carlisle Scr., at Mer. 
Miami vs. Wilmington C at Oxford. 
Middlebury vs. St. Michael's, at Mid. 
Miss. A.&M. vs. .Miss. C, at Ag. Coll. 
Monmouth vs. Lombard, at Monmouth. 
Oberlin vs. Heidelberg, at Oberlin. 
Ohio State U. vs. Otterbein, at Col'b's. 
Ohio Wes. vs. Kenyon, at Gambicr. 



Union vs. St. Law., at Schenectady. 
U. of Ala. vs. Howard C, at Tusc'l'a. 
U. of Cincinnati vs. Antioch, at Cin. 
U. of Pa. vs. Gettysburg, at Phila. 
U. of Ya. vs. Ran. -Mac, at Char'v'le. 
U. of Wyo. vs. Laramie H.S.. at Lar. 
Yanderbiit vs. Birm. at Nashville. 
Washb'n vs. Coll. of Emp., at Topeka. 
Wash. & Jeff. vs. Ind. Nor., at Wash. 
Wes. vs. Conn. Agri., at Middletown. 
West. Res. vs. Hiram Coll., at Hiram. 
W. Ya. vs. Waynesb'g, at Morgant'n. 
Wm Jewell vs. Missouri, at Columbia. 
Worcester P.I. vs. Tufts, at Medford. 
W. Ya. vs. Glenville N., at Buckh'n. 
Yale vs. Holy Cross, at New Haven. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



269 



MONDAY, OCTOBER 2. 
Ouachita vs. Little Rock, at Lit. R'k. [Transylvania 
St. Mary's vs. Cooper, at St. Mary's. J 



Maryville. at Lex. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 4. 
Brown vs. R. I. State, at Providence. [Princeton vs. Rutgers, at Princeton. 
Dartmouth vs. Bowdoin, at Hanover. IU. of Pa. vs. Frank. & Mar., at Phil. 



F/. of Det. vs. Mich. 



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 
Ag., at Lansing-. 



o. 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 6. 
Tex. A. & M. vs. Southw'n. at Coll. S.ISt. Mary's C. vs. Campbell, at St. M. 
Cen. D. of la. vs. Penn Coll, at Pella.l 



SATURDAY, 
Amherst vs. Wesleyan. at Amherst. 
Antioch vs. Heidelberg-, at Tiffin. 
Army vs. U. of Vt., at West Point. 
Bates vs. Ft. McKinley, at Lewiston. 
Baylor vs. Polytechnic U.. at Waco. 
Brown vs. Mass. Agri. Coll.. at Prov. 
Buchtel vs. Mt. Union, at Akron. 
Bucknell vs. Lehigh, at South Beth. 
Carlisle vs. St. Mary's, at Carlisle. 
Chris. Bros. vs. U. of Mem., at Mem. 
Citadel vs. D. of Fla., at Gainesville. 
Colgate vs. Hobart, at Hamilton 
Conn. Agri. Coll. vs. Tufts, at Medf'd. 
Col. State vs. U. of Utah, at S. L. C. 
Cornell vs. Oberlin. at Ithaca. 
Dartmouth vs. Colby, at Hanover. 
Davidson vs. Ya. M.I.. at Roanoke. 
Denison vs. Wooster, at Granville. 
Dickinson vs. West. Md., at Carlisle. 
Eariham vs. Moore's Hill, at Richm'd. 
Gallaudet vs. Mt. St. Mary's, at Em. 
Georgetown vs. Wm. & M.. at Wash. 
Hamilton vs. R.P.I.. at Clinton. 
Hamp.-Sid. vs. U. C. Med., at H.-S. 
Hanover vs. Kentucky M.I.. at Han. 
Haverford vs. Rutgers, at New Bruns. 
Holy Cross vs. Harvard, at Cambridge. 
Iowa State vs. Minnesota, at Minn. 
Johns Hopkins vs. Navv. at Annapolis. 
Kan. St. A.C. vs. Kan. S.N.. at Man. 
Knox vs. Bradley, at Galesburg. 
Lafayette vs. Swarthmore. at Easton. 
Lawrencev'e vs. Prince. Fr.. at Law. 
La. State vs. Lafayette, at Baton R'e. 
Leander Clark vs. Grinnell, at Grin'l. 
Lebanon Yal. vs. Del. Coll., at New'k. 
Mercersb'g vs. Laf. Scr., at Merc'b'g. 
Miami vs. Ohio State, at Columbus. 
Mich. Agri. Coll. vs. Alma, at E. Lan. 
New York U. vs. Muhlenberg, at N.Y. 
N.C. A, & M. U.S.T.S. Frank., at Ral. 
Northwestern vs. Monm'th. at Evans. 
N-orthwestern vs. Beloit. at Beloit. 
Norwich vs. Middlebury. ' at Montpel'r 
Ohio Wes. vs. Ohio U.. at Delaware. 
Olivet vs. Kalamazoo, at Olivet. 
Otterbein vs. St. Mary's I., at Dayton. 
E 



OCTOBER 7. 

[Pacific vs. Portland, at Forest Grove. 
Parsons vs. Drake, at Des Moines. 
I Pawling S. vs. Rutgers P., at Pawl'g, 
iPenna. State vs. Gettysb'g. at St. C. 
iPrinceton vs. Yillanova, at Princeton. 
| Purdue vs. Wabash, at Lafayette. 
iRichmond vs. Fredericksb'g. at Rich. 
iRipon vs. Oshkosh H.S.. at Ripon. 
Rock Hill vs. Wash., at Chestertown, 
Rose P.I. vs. East. 111. N., at Ter. H. 
Scio vs. Muskingum, at Scio. 
Southw'n P.U. vs. U. of Miss, at Ox'd. 
Southern U. vs. Miss. Coll., at Clinton. 
Springfield Tr. S. vs. Williams. 
St. John's vs. Eastern Coll.. at Annap. 
St. Joseph's vs. Wis. S.N. at Dubuq'e. 
St. Law. U. vs. U. of Roch., at Roch. 
St. Louis U. vs. Drurv C. at St. L. 
:Taft Sch. vs. St. Paul's, at Watert'n. 
Trinity vs. Worcester, at Hartford. 
|Union vs. Stevens, at Schenectady. 
JU. of Ala. vs. Birm., at Tuscaloosa. 
U. of Chicago vs. Indina U.. at Chic, 
U. of Cin. vs. Transylvania, at Cin. 
U. of 111. vs. Millikin U.. at Urbana, 
iU. of Maine vs. N. Hamp.. at Orono. 
U. of Mich. vs. Case S., at Ann Arb. 
U. of Missouri vs. Rolla. at Columbia. 
U. of Neb. vs. Kearney N.. at Lincoln. 
U. of Pa. vs. Ursinus. at Philadelphia. 
U. of Pitts, vs. Westminster, at Pitts. 
U. of S. C. vs. U. of Ga.. at Athens. 
U. of So. Dak. vs. Pillsb'y. at Owat'a. 
U. of Texas, vs. Tex. C.U.. at Austin. 
U of Ya. vs. Wm. & M.. at Char'ville. 
U. of Wis. vs. Lawrence, at Madison, 
U. of Wyo. vs. Col. Coll. at Col. Spr. 
Yanderbilt vs. Maryville. at Nashv'e. 
Washburn vs. Ottawa U.. at Topeka. 
Wash. & Jeff. vs. Bethany, at Wash. 
Wash. & Lee vs. Roanoke C. at Lex. 
Washington vs. Shurtleff. at St. Louis. 
Waynesburg vs. Carnegie T., at Pitts. 
West. Res. vs. Kenyon. at Cleveland. 
W. Ya. Wes. vs. Broaddus. at Buck'n. 
Wm. Jewell vs. Central, at Kan. City. 
Yale vs. Syracuse, at New Haven. 



270 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



MONDAY. OCTOBER 9. 
A. C. of Utah vs. Col. Ag. C. at L'n.jSouthw'n P.U. vs. Miss. A.&M., at St. 

Ouachita C. vs. Memphis U., at Mem.i 

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11. 
Brown vs. Conn. Ag. C, at Provid'e. |St. -John's C. vs. Navy, at Annapolis. 
Pawling S. vs. Stevens P., at Pawling. U. of Pa. vs. Dickinson, at Phila. 
Princeton vs. Lehigh, at Princeton. Ju. of Yt. vs. Clarkson T., at Burl'n. 

THURSDAY. OCTOBER 12. 

Tulane vs. Miss. Coll., at New Orleans. 

FRIDAY', OCTOBER 13. 
DePauw vs. Wabash, at Crawfordsv'e.jParsons vs. Central Coll., at Fairfield. 
Hanover vs. Ky. Cent. U., at Danv'e.lTex. A. & M. vs. Aust. C, at Coll. S. 



SATURDAY, 
Ag. C. of Utah vs. Col. C, at Logan. 
Allegh*y C. vs. Kenyon, at Meadville. 
Amherst vs. Trinity, at Hartford. 
Antioch vs. St. Mary's I., at Dayton. 
Army vs. Rutgers, at West Point. 
Bates vs. Exeter, at Exeter. 
Brown vs. Bowdoin, at Providence. 
Bucknell vs. Wyo. Sem.. at Lewisb'g. 
Carnegie Tech. vs. Geneva, at Pitts. 
Carlisle vs. Georgetown, at Wash. 
Case vs. Donison. at Cleveland. 
Chris. Bros. vs. Turn. S., at Memphis. 
Citadel vs. Mercer U., at Savannah. 
Colby vs. Boston Coll., at Waterville. 
Charleston C. vs. U. of S. C, at Char. 
Conn. Ag. C. vs. Wills. S., at Storrs. 
Cornell vs. Tenn State, at Ithaca. 
Dartmouth vs. Holy Cr., at Hanover. 
Davidson vs. Lenoir, at Davidson. 
Earlham vs. Cincinnati, at Richmond. 
Gallaudet vs. Mt. St. Jos., at Wash. 
Hamilton vs. Hobart, at Clinton. 
Havard vs. Williams, at Cambridge. 
Haverford vs. Delaware, at Haverf'd. 
Hastings vs. Kearney, at Kearney. 
Johns Hopkins vs. Stev's, at Baltim'e. 
Knox vs. Millikin, at Decatur. 
Lafayette vs. Gettysburg, at Easton. 
Lawrence v'e S. vs. Havf'd S., at Law. 
Leander Clark vs. Simp., at Indianola. 
Leb. Vail. vs. Indian Sec, at Annv'e. 
Marietta vs. Marshall, at Huntington. 
Mass. Agri. vs. Wor. P. I., at Amherst. 
Mercersb'g vs. U. of Ta. Scr., at Mer. 
Miami vs. Kentucky State, at Oxford. 
Miss. A. & M. vs. Howard, at Agri. C. 
Monmouth vs. Beloit, at Beloit. 
Mt. Union vs. U. of Mich. F., at A. A. 
Muhlenb'g vs. Williamson, at Allent'n. 
N. Dak. A. vs. N. Dak. S.S., at Wah. 
Northwcst'n vs. 111. Wes., at Evans'n. 
Northwest 'n vs. Lake For., at Lake F. 
Oberlin vs. Hiram, at Oberlin. 
Occidental vs. Whittier, at Los Ang. 
Ohio Stat.' vs. West. Res., at Clevel'd. 



OCTOBER 14. 

Ohio Wes. vs. Wittenberg, at Delaw'e. 
Olivet vs. U. of Detroit, at Detroit. 
Otterb'n vs. Muskingum, at Waterv'e. 
Pawling S. vs. Pomfret S., at Pom. C. 
Princeton vs. Colgate, at Princeton. 
Rensselaer P.I. vs. Middleb'y, at Troy. 
Richmond vs. Ran. -Macon, at Richm'd. 
Roanoke vs. King Coll., at Bristol. 
Rock Hill vs. Baltim'e Poly, at El. C. 
R. I. State vs. Nor. U., at Kingston. 
Shurtleff vs. Charleston N\, at Char'n. 
Southern U. vs. State N.C.. at Troy. 
State U. of la. vs. Mornings'e, at I. C. 
St. John's vs. U. of Md., at Annapolis. 
St. Mary's vs. Kansas U., at Lawr'e. 
Scio vs. Westminster, at New Wilm'n. 
Syracuse vs. Rochester, at Rochester. 
Taft S. vs. Cheshire S., at Watert'n. 
Trinity vs. Tex. Chris. U.. at Ft. W. 
Union vs. Wesleyan. at Middletown. 
U. of Ala. vs. U. of Ga., at Birm'h'm. 
U. of Ark. vs. Drury. at Fayetteville. 
U. of Chicago vs. Purdue, at Chicago. 
U. of Colorado vs. Alumni, at Boulder. 
U. of Illinois, vs. St. L., at Urbana. 
U. of Maine vs. Tufts, at Medford. 
U. of Mich. vs. Mich Agri., at Lans'g. 
U. of Mont. vs. Wash. S.C., at Miss'a. 
U. of Neb. vs. Kansas, at Uncoln. 
U. of Pa. vs. Yillanova, at Philadel'a. 
U. of Pittsburg vs. Buchtel, at Pitts. 
U. of S. Dak. vs. Shattuck. at Farib't. 
U. of Tex. vs. Southwest'n, at Austin. 
U. of Utah vs. Denver U., at Denver. 
U. of Yt. vs. St. Law., at Burlington. 
U. of Ya. vs. Swarth., at Char'ville. 
U. of Wis. vs. Ripon, at Madison. 
Ursinus vs. Frank. & Mar., at Coll' v'e. 
Yanderbilt U. vs. Rose P. I., at Nash. 
Washburn vs. Fairmount, at W r ichita. 
Wash. & Jeff. vs. Navy, at Annapolis. 
Wash. & Lee vs. Hamp.-Sid., at Lex. 
W. Ya. U. vs. Ohio U.. at Morgant'n. 
Waynes, vs. W. Ya. Wes.. at Buckh'n. 
Yale vs. Virginia P.I., at New Haven. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



271 



MONDAY, OCTOBER 16. 
Ouachita vs. N. S. of Ark., at Con'y.lCent. Coll. vs. Mo. Valley C, at Mar. 

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17. 
Baylor U. vs. Austin Coll., at Waco. 

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER IS. 
Pawling S. vs. Dean Acad., at Pawl'g. ITaft S. vs. River-view A., at Watert'n. 
Tulane vs. South'n Ind. I., at N. Or.lWaynesb'g vs. Cal. S.N., at Wayn'g. 

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19. 
Bucknell vs. N. Car. A. & M., at Ral.lU. of Detroit vs. Ypsilanti N., at Det. 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20. 
Cent. U. of ia. vs. Ellsw'th, at Pella.lLa. St. U. vs. Miss. Coll.. at Bat. R. 
Hastings vs. Grand Island, at Hast's.lMiss. A. & M. vs. U. of Ala., at Col. 



SATURDAY, 
Ag. C. of Utah vs. Den. U., at Logan. 
Allegheny vs. Mt. Union, at Canton. 
Antioch vs. Wilmington, at Wilm'ton. 
Army vs. Yale, at West Point. 
Bates vs. Colby, at Lewiston. 
Baylor vs. State Univ., at Austin. 
Buchtel vs. Mich. Agri. C. at Akron. 
Carlisle vs. U. of Pittsburg, at Pitts. 
Case vs. Kenyon, at Cleveland. 
Chr. Br. C. vs. Cov. H.S., at Cov't'n. 
Colgate vs. Trinity, at Utica. 
Cornell vs. Wash. & Jeff., at Ithaca. 
Dartmouth vs. Williams, at Hanover. 
Davidson vs. U. of N. Car., at CharFe. 
DePauw vs. St. Louis U., at St. L. 
Dickinson vs. Haverford, at Haverf'd. 
Eastern vs. Roanoke, at Manassas. 
Earlham vs. Rose Poly, at Terre H'te. 
Fairmount vs. Kan. S.N.. at Wichita. 
Gallaudet vs. Bait. City C, at Wash. 
Georgetown vs. Rich'd Coll., at Rich. 
Grinnell vs. Simpson, at Indianola. 
Hamilton vs. Rochester, at Rochester. 
Hamp.-Sid. vs. Med. C. of Va., at H.S. 
Hanover vs. Ky. State U.. at Lex'ton. 
Harvard vs. Amherst, at Cambridge. 
Iowa State C. vs. Missouri, at Ames. 
Kan. St. Ag. vs. U. of Kan., at Man. 
Knox vs. Iowa Wesleyan, at Galesb'g. 
Lake Forest vs. Carroll, at Lake For. 
Lawrencev'e vs. Blair H.. at Law'v'e. 
Leander Clark vs. Coe. at Cedar Raj). 
Lebanon Vail. vs. St. Bon., at St. Bon. 
Lehigh vs. Ursinus, at Bethlehem. 
Marietta vs. W. Va. Wes., at Mari'ta. 
Mass. Ag. C. vs. Holy Cr., at Worc'r. 
Mercersb'g vs. Princeton Fr., at Mer. 
Miami vs. Wittenburg, at Springfield. 
Monmouth vs. Parsons, at Monmouth. 
Muhlenb'g vs. Gettvsb'g, at Gettysb'g. 
New York U. vs. R. I. State, at N.Y r . 
N. Dak. Ag. vs. Dak. Wes., at Fargo. 
Northwest'n vs. Indiana U., at Ev'ton. 



OCTOBER 21. 
Northwest'n vs. St. J. M.A., at Dela'd. 
Norwich vs. Bowdoin, at Brunswick. 
Oberlin vs. Denison, at Oberlin. 
Occidental vs. Redlands, at Redlands. 
Ohio Wes. vs. West. Res., at Delaw'e. 
Olivet vs. Hillsdale, at Olivet. 
Pacific U. vs. U. of Oregon, at Eugene. 
Pawling S. vs. Gunnery, at Pawling. 
Pa. State vs. Villanova, at State Coll. 
Princeton vs. Navy, at Annapolis. 
Rensselaer Poly vs. Hobart, at Troy. 
Rock Hill vs. U. of Md., at Ellicott C. 
Rutgers vs. Union, at New Brunsw'k. 
Southwest'n P.U. vs. Bethel, at Clark. 
State U. of Ia. vs. Cornell, at Iowa C. 
Stevens vs. Swarthmore, at Hoboken. 
St. John's vs. U. of Va., at Char'v'le. 
St. Jos. vs. Upper Ia. U.. at Fayette. 
St. Lawrence vs. Middleb'v, at Cant'n. 
St. Mary's vs. Coll. of Emp.. at St. M. 
Syracuse vs. Lafayette, at Syracuse, 
Taft S. vs. Mackenzie S., at Dobbs F. 
Texas A. & M. vs. Ala. Poly, at Dai's. 
Transylv'a vs. Ohio North. L T ., at Lex. 
Tulane vs. La. State N., at New Or. 
U. of Ark. vs. Hendricks, at Favettev. 
U. of Chicago vs. U. of 111., at Chic. 
U. of Cin. vs. Otterbein, at Cincinnati. 
U. of Idaho vs. Wash. St., at Mosc'w. 
U. of Maine vs. Vermont, at Orono. 
U. of Mich. vs. Ohio St. U.. at Ann A. 
U. of Mont. vs. Mont. S. M., at Butte. 
U. of Neb. vs. Minnesota, at Minneap. 
U. of Pa. vs. Brown, at Philadelphia. 
U. of S. C. vs. U. of Fla., at Col'b'a. 
U. of South vs. U. of Ga., at Athens. 
U. of Wis. vs. Col. Coll.. at Madison. 
U. of Wyo. vs. Col. S. of M.. at Lar. 
Vand'b't vs. Cent. U. of Ky.. at Nash. 
Va. M.I. vs. Ran. -Mac, at Lexington. 
Va. P.I. vs. West. Md., at Blacksb'g. 
Wabash vs. Marquette, at Milwaukee. 
Washburn vs. Hask. Ind's, at Topeka. 



272 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL TOOT BALL GUIDE. 



SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21— (Continued). 



Wash. & Lee vs. Wake Forest, at Lex. 
Wash. U. vs. Westminster, at St. L. 
Waynesburg vs. Bethany, at Bethany. 
Wesleyan vs. Tufts, at Middletown. 



W. Va. vs. Westminster, at Morg't'n. 
Wm. Jewell vs. C. of Emp., at Emp'a. 
Worcester Foly vs. Spr. T.S., at Spr. 



MONDAY, OCTOBER 23. 
Ouachita vs. La. Ind. S.. at Arkadelphia. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23. 
Southern U. vs. Ala. P.C., at Greensboro. 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27. 
Hastings vs. Bellevue, at Hastings. I Washburn vs. U. of Okla., at Norman. 
Tex. A. & M. vs. U. of Miss., at C. S.|Wm. Jewell vs. Warrensb'g, at Lib'ty. 



SATURDAY 

Amherst vs. Norwich, at Amherst. 
Army vs. Lehigh, at West Point. 
Bates vs. Univ. of Maine, at Orono. 
Baylor vs. Southwest'n U., at Waco. 
Buchtel vs. Marietta, at Akron. 
Bucknell vs. Rochester, at Rochester. 
Carlisle vs. Lafayette, at Easton. 
Carnegie Tech. vs. Grove C, at Pitts. 
Chris. Bros. vs. Paragould, at Memp's. 
Citadel vs. Charleston, at Charleston. 
Colby vs. Bowdoin, at Waterville. 
Conn. Ag. C. vs. Hotch. S., at Lakev. 
Col. St. C. vs. Col. S. of M., at Ft. C. 
Cornell vs. U. of Pitts., at Ithaca. 
Dartmouth vs. U. of Yt., at Hanover. 
Denison vs. Wittenb'g. at Springfield. 
DePauw vs. Purdue, at Lafayette. 
Dickinson vs. Ursinns, at Collegeville. 
Earlham vs. Wilmington, at Wilming. 
Gallaudet vs. Mt. Wash., at Baltim'e. 
Georgetown vs. St. John's, at Wash. 
Gettysb'g vs. Johns Hop., at Baltim'e. 
Hamilton vs. Middleb'y, at Middleb'y. 
Hamp.-Sid. vs. Richmond, at Richm'd. 
Harvard vs. Brown, at Cambridge. 
Haverf'd vs. Frank. & Mar., at Lane. 
Hiram vs. Wooster, at Wooster. 
Indiana U. vs. Wash., at Bloomington. 
Iowa State Coll. vs. Grinnell, at Ames. 
Kan. St. Ag. C. vs. Fairm't. at Manh. 
Knox vs. Lake Forest, at Galesburg. 
Lawrencev'e vs. Tome, at Port Deposit. 
Leander Clark vs. Normal, at Cedar F. 
Mass. Agri. vs. Tufts, at Medford. 
Mereersb'g vs. U. of Pa. Fr., at Mer. 
Mich. Agri. vs. Olivet, at E. Lansing. 
Miss. A. & M. vs. Auburn, at Birm. 
Monmouth vs. Millikin, at Decatur. 
Mt. Union vs. Kenyon, at Alliance. 
Muhlenb'g vs. Del. State, at Allent'n. 
N. Y. Univ. vs. Williams, at Wil't'n. 
N. C. A. & M. vs. U. of Tenn, at Ral. 
N. D. Agri. vs. S. D. S.C., at Brook's. 
Norwest'n vs. U of Wis., at Evanston. 
Northwestern vs. Ripon, at Ripon. 
Oberlin vs. Case, at Oberlin. 



OCTOBER 28. 

Occidental vs. Throop, at Los Angeles. 
Ohio State U. vs. Ohio Wes., at Col'bs. 
Otterbein vs. Ohio U., at Westerville. 
Pacific U. vs. Hills M.A., at For. Gr. 
Pawling vs. Yale Fresh., at N. Haven. 
Princeton vs. Holy Cross, at Princeton. 
R. I. State vs. N. H. S.C., at Durh'm. 
Roanoke vs. Ran. -Macon, at Salem. 
Rose P. vs. Cent. U. of Ky., at Louis. 
Rutgers vs. Swarthmore, at Swarth. 
Shurtleff vs. 111. Wesleyan, at Alton. 
Stare U. of la. vs. Minn., at Minneap. 
Stevens vs. Wash. Coll., at Chestert'n. 
St. Joseph vs. Ellsworth, at Dubuque. 
St. L. U. vs. Mo. S. of M., at St. L. 
St. Mary's vs. Southwestern, at St. M. 
Syracuse vs. Spring'd T.S., at Syrac'e. 
Taft Sch. vs. Gunnery, at Watertown. 
Talladega vs. Atlanta U., at Tallad'a. 
Transylv'a vs. Georget'n, at George'n. 
Trinity vs. Wesleyan, at Hartford. 
Tulane vs. Howard, at New Orleans. 
Union vs. Hobart, at Buffalo. 
U. of Ala. vs. Ga. Tech., at Atlanta. 
U. of Cin. vs. Ky. State, at Lexingt'n. 
U. of Col. vs. Wyoming, at Boulder. 
U. of Detroit vs. Hillsdale, at Detroit. 
U. of Idaho vs. U. of Wash., at Spok. 
U. of Mich. vs. Yanderbilt. at Ann Ar. 
U. of Neb. vs. Missouri, at Lincoln. 
U. of Ore. vs. Wash St., at Pullman. 
U. of Pa. vs. Penn. State C, at Phila. 
U. of S. D. vs. U. of N. D., at G. F. 
U. of Texas vs. U. of Ark., at Austin. 
Utah Agri. vs. U. of Utah, at S. L. C. 
Ya. M.I. vs. U. of Va.. at Char'ville. 
Va. Poly vs. Wash. & Lee, at Roan'ke. 
Wabash vs. Hanover, at Crawfordsv'e. 
Wash. & Jeff. vs. Westmin., at Wash. 
Wash. U. vs. Ind. U., at Bloomington. 
West. Md. vs. Rock Hill, at Westmin. 
Western Res. vs. Navy, at Annapolis. 
W. Va. Wes. vs. Morris H., at Buck'n. 
Worcester P. vs. Rensselaer, at Troy. 
Yale vs. Colgate, at New Haven. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



273 



MONDAY, OCTOBER 30. 

Ouachita vs. Hendrix C, at Conway. 



WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1. 

Rock Hill vs. Balto, City C, at Balto. 



THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 2. 

U. of S. C. vs. Clemson, at Columbia. 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3. 

C. U. of la. vs. Am. S. Os., at Kirksv. IHastings vs. Doane. at Hastings. 
DePauw vs. Mich. Ag's, at Greencas'e. Parsons vs. la. Wes., at Mt. Pleas't. 
Fairmount vs. Coll. of Emp., at Emp. |Trinity vs. Daniel Baker, at Brownw'd. 



SATURDAY 
A. C. of Utah vs. Mont. S.M., at B'te 
Allegheny vs. Carnegie T., at Meadv'e 
Amherst vs. Dartmouth, at Amherst. 
Antioch vs. Wilming., at Yellow Spr. 
Army vs. Georgetown, at West Point. 
Bates vs. Bowdoin, at Lewiston. 
Baylor vs. La. State, at Waco. 
Brown vs. Tufts, at Providence. 
Buchtel vs. Ohio Northern, at Akron. 
Bucknell vs. Lafayette, at Easton. 
Case vs. Ohio State, at Cleveland. 
Chris. Bros. vs. Union C. T.S., at U. C, 
Citadel vs. Clemson, at Charleston. 
Colby vs. Maine, at Orono. 
Colgate vs. Wesleyan, at Hamilton. 
C. of Charlest'n vs. Davids'n, at Char. 
Conn. Agri. vs. Monson A., at Monson. 
Col. State vs. Denver U., at Ft. Col's. 
Cornell vs. Williams, at Ithaca. 
Denison vs. Otterbein, at Granville. 
Dickinson vs. Frank & Mar., at Carl'e. 
Eastern vs. Manassas H.S., at Manas. 
Earlham vs. Wabash, at Crawfordv'e. 
Gallaudet vs. Johns Hopkins, at Balto. 
Grinnell vs. Coe, at Grinnell. 
Hamilton vs. St. Lawrence, at Canton. 
Harvard vs. Princeton, at Princeton. 
Hiram vs. Scio, at Hiram. 
Holy Cross vs. Springf'd T.S., at Wor. 
Ind. U. vs. Cent. U. of Ky., at Bloom. 
Iowa State vs. Nebraska, at Ames. 
Kan. State Ag. vs. Baker, at Baldwin. 
Knox vs. Washington, at St. Louis. 
Lake For. vs. 111. Wes., at Bloom'ton. 
Lehigh vs. Haverford, at Haverford. 
Marietta vs. Muskingum, at N. Conc'd. 
Mass. Ag. vs. N. H. Coll., at Manch'r. 
Mercersb'g vs. Lawrencev'e, at Lawr'e. 
Miami vs. Ohio Wes., at Delaware. 
Middleb'y vs. Boston C, .at Middleb'y. 
Mt. Union vs. Wooster, at Alliance. 
Muhlenb'g vs. Leb. Vail., at Allent'n. 
N. C. A. & M. vs. Navy, at Annapolis. 
N. D. Agri. vs. Fargo Coll., at Fargo. 



NOVEMBER 4. 

Northwest'n vs. Lawr'ce, at Watert'n. 
Oberlin vs. West. Res., at Cleveland. 
Occidental vs. U. of So. Cal., at Los A. 
Olivet vs. U. of Mich. Fr., at Olivet. 
Pacific U. vs. U. of Idaho, at Portland. 
Pawling vs. Hotchkiss, at Lakeville. 
Penn. State vs. St. Bon., at State Coll. 
R. I. State vs. Wor. Poly, at Worc'r. 
Ripon vs. Beloit. at Beloit. 
Rock Hill vs. Catholic U., at Wash. 
Rose Poly vs. Franklin, at Terre H. 
Rutgers vs. Rens. P. I., at N. Bruns. 
Southwest'n P.U. vs. How., at Clarks. 
St. L. U. vs. Haskell Ind., at St. L. 
St. John's vs. Md. Agri., at Coll. Park. 
St. Joseph vs. St. Thomas, at St. Paul. 
St. Mary's Coll. vs. Ottawa, at St. M. 
Talladega vs. Atlanta B.C., at Atlanta. 
Tex. A. & M. vs. Tex. C.U., at Coll S. 
Transylvania vs. Ky. Wes., at Lex'g'n. 
Tulane vs. Sewanee, at New Orleans. 
Union vs. Rochester, at Schenectady. 
U. of Ark. vs. Mo. S. of M., at Joplin. 
U. of Chic. vs. U. of Minn., at Minn. 
U. of Cin. vs. Butler, at Cincinnati 
U. of Col. vs. Col. Coll., at Boulder. 
U*. of Detroit vs. Alma, at Detroit. 
U. of Illinois vs. Purdue, at Urbana. 
U. of Idaho vs. Wash. S., at Pullman. 
U. of Mich. vs. Syracuse, at Ann Arb. 
U. of Mont. vs. Mont. State, as Mis'la. 
U. of Mo. vs. Oklahoma, at Columbia. 
U. of Oregon vs. Whitman, at Eugene. 
U. of Pa. vs. Carlisle, at Philadelphia. 
U. of Pitts, vs. Notre Dame, at Pitts. 
U. of S. D. vs. Carl. C, at Shaw F'ld. 
U. of Utah vs. Col. S.M., at S. L. C. 
U. of Vt. vs. Norwich, at Burlington. 
U. of Va. vs. Wake For., at Char'ville. 
U. of Wis. vs. Iowa State, at Madis. 
Va. P.I. vs. U. of N. C, at Richmond. 
Vanderbilt vs. U. of Ga., at Nashville. 
Washburn vs. U. of Kan., at Topeka. 
Waynesb'g vs. Geneva, at Waynesb'g. 



274 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 4— (Continued). 



W. & J. vs. W. Va., at Morgantown. 
W. & L. vs. Med. Coll. Va., at Lex. 
W. Va. Wes. vs. Fainn't N., at Fair't. 
Wesleyan vs. Williams, at Middletown. 



West. Md. vs. Del., at Westniinstec. 
Whitman vs. U. of Oregon, at Eugene. 
Wm. Jewell vs. Tarkio, at St. Joseph. 
Yale vs. New York U., at New Haven. 



MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6. 
Ouachita vs. Centenary, at Shreveport.JTaft Sch. vs. Choate Seh., at Watert'n. 



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7. 
New York U. vs. Trinity, at N. Y. 



WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 8. 
W. & J. vs. Waynesb'g, at Wash. 



THURSRDAY, NOVEMBER 9. 
Southern U. vs. Spring H.C., at Mob'e.lU. of Detroit vs. Adrain, at Adrain. 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10. 
Cent. U. of la. vs. la. Wes., at Pella. [Hanover vs. Moore's H.. at Moore's H. 
Cent. vs. Warrensb'g N., at Warrensb. Parsons vs. Penn Coll.. at Oskaloosa. 
Earlham vs. Butler, at Richmond. Transylv'a vs. Mor.-Har., at Lexingt'n. 

Fairmount vs. Baker, at Wichita. I 



SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 11. 



Ag. C. of Utah vs. Mont. Ag.. at Boze. 
Allegheny vs. Hiram, at Meadville. 
Amherst vs. Wor. P. I., at Amherst. 
Antioch vs. Otterbein, at Westerville. 
Army vs. Bucknell, at W T est Point. 
Baylor vs. Texas Christian, at Waco. 
Buchtel vs. Western Res., at Akron. 
Carnegie T. vs. Westminster, at Pitts. 
Case vs. Ohio Wesleyan. at Cleveland. 
Chris. Bros. vs. Little Rock, at L. R. 
Citadel vs. P.M. A., at Charleston. 
Colby vs. Holy Cross, at Worcester. 
Colgate vs. Penn. State, at State Coll. 
Col. S. of M. vs. Denver U., at Denver. 
Conn. Agri. vs. dishing, at Ashbur'm. 
Col. State vs. U. of Col., at Boulder. 
Cornell vs. Michigan, at Ithaca. 
Davidson vs. Wake Forest, at Greensb. 
DePauw vs. Miami, at Greencastle. 
Dickinson vs. Gettysburg, at Carlisle. 
Eastern vs. Ran. -Mac, at Front Royal. 
Grinnell vs. Drake, at Des Moines. 
Hamp.-Sid. vs. Ran. -Mac, at Richm'd. 
Harvard vs. Carlisle, at Cambridge. 
Haverford vs. Stevens, at Hoboken. 
Iowa State vs. Cornell, at Ames. 
Johns Hopkins vs. U. of Va., at Balto. 
Kan. Agri. C. vs. Creighton, at Man. 
Knox vs. Monmouth, at Monmouth. 
Lake Forest vs. Beloit, at Lake For. 
Leander Clark vs. Penn., at Toledo. 
Lebanon Vail. vs. Middlet'n, at Annv. 



Lehigh vs. Swarthmore, at Bethlehem. 
La. St. vs. Miss. A. & M.. at Bat. R. 
Marietta vs. Bethany, at Marietta. 
Mass. Agri. vs. Trinity, at Hartford. 
Mercersb'g vs. Conway Hall, at Merc. 
Mich. Agri. vs. Mt. Union, at E. Lans. 
Middleb'y vs. Clarkson T. , at Potsdam. 
Muhlenb'g vs. Fr. & Mar., at Allent'n. 
New York U. vs. Rutgers, at N. Y. 
N. D. Agri. vs. N. D. U., at Fargo. 
Northwestern vs. Carroll, at Watert'n. 
Oberlin vs. Wooster, at Wooster. 
Ohio State vs. Kenyon, at Columbus. 
Olivet vs. Alma, at Olivet. 
Pawling Sch. vs. Penn. Fr. , at Pawl'g. 
Princeton vs. Dartmouth, at Princeton. 
Purdue vs. Iowa State, at Lafayette. 
Rens. Poly vs. Rochester, at Roch. 
R. I. State vs. Boston C. at Kings'n. 
Richm'd vs. Wm. & Mary, at W'msb'g. 
Rose Poly vs. Wabash, at Terre Haute. 
Ripon vs. Lawrence, at Appleton. 
Roanoke vs. Va. Mil. I., at Lexington. 
Rock Hill vs. Loyola, at Ellicott City. 
Shurtleff vs. Illinois Coll., at Alton. 
St. John's vs. Gallaudet. at Annapolis. 
St. Jos. vs. la. S.T. Coll., at Dubuque. 
St. Louis vs. Arkansas U.. at St. L. 
Syracuse vs. Vermont, at Syracuse. 
Taft Sch. vs. Wes. Fr.. at Watert'wn. 
Talladega vs. Meharrv M.C.. at Nashv. 
Trinity vs. Poly. Coll.. at Ft. Worth. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



275 



SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 11— (Continued). 



Tufts vs. Springfield, at Springfield. 
Tulane ys. U. of Ala., at Tuscaloosa. 
Union vs. Hamilton, at Clinton. 
U. of Chic. vs. Northwestern, at Chic. 
U. of Cin. vs. Denison, at Cincinnati. 
U. of Illinois vs. Indiana, at Indianap. 
U. of Idaho vs. Whitman, at Moscow. 
U. of Maine vs. Bowdoin, at Brunsw'k. 
U. of Mont. vs. Mont. S.M., at Mis'la. 
U. of Nebraska vs. Doane, at Lincoln. 
U. of Pa. vs. Lafayette, at Philadel'a. 
U. of S.C. vs. U. of N.C., at Ch. Hill. 



U. of S. D. vs. St. Thomas, at St. T. 
U. of South vs. Ga. Tech., at Atlanta. 
U. of Wyo. vs. Grand Isl., at Laramie. 
Va. Poly vs. U. of Tenn., at Blacksb'g. 
Washburn vs. Kansas Nor., at Topeka. 
Wash, and Jeff. vs. Geneva, at Wash. 
Wash. U. vs. Missouri U., at St. L. 
West. Md. vs. Ursinus, at Collegeville. 
Wm. Jewell vs. Rolla S.M.. at Kan. C. 
W. & L. vs. N. C. A. & M., at Ral'gh. 
W. Va. U. vs. Navy, at Annapolis. 
Yale vs. Brown, at New Haven. 



MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13. 
Ouachita vs. Phy. and Sur., at Ark'a.jU. of Tex. vs. Tex. A. & M., at Hous. 

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14. 
Talladega vs. Fiske U., at Nashville. 

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1G. 

U. of Detroit vs. St. John's, at Det. 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 17. 
Central Coll. vs. Kirksv'e. at Fayette. I Southern U. vs. Marion C, at Greensb. 
Earlham vs. Antioch, at Richmond. Taft S. vs. Westmins'r S., at Simsb'g. 

Hanover vs. Franklin, at Franklin. |Wm. Jewell vs. Baker, at Baldwin. 



SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 18. 



Allegheny vs. W. Va. U., at Morg't'n. 
Amherst vs. Williams, at Williamst'n. 
Army vs. Colgate, at West Point. 
Baylor vs. Cent. U. of Ky., at Waco. 
Brown vs. Vermont, at Providence. 
Buchtel vs. Case, at Akron. 
Bucknell vs. Villanova, at Wilkes-B'e. 
Carlisle vs. Syracuse, at Syracuse. 
Chr. Bros. vs. Memphis H.S., at Mem. 
Citadel vs. Charleston, at Charleston. 
Col. S. of M. vs. Col. Coll., at Denver. 
Conn. Agri. vs. Boston Coll., at Storrs. 
Col. State vs. Ft. Logan, at Ft. Coil's. 
Cornell vs. Chicago, at Chicago. 
Davidson vs. U. of S. C, at Columbia. 
Denison vs. Kenyon, at Granville. 
DePauw vs. Butler, at Indianapolis. 
Dickinson vs. Swarthmore, at Swarth. 
Fairm't vs. Southw'n Kan. C, at Wich. 
Gallaudet vs. Wash. Coll., at Wash. 
Georgetown vs. Virginia, at Wash. 
Gettysburg vs. Delaware, at Getysb'sr. 
Hamp.-Sid. vs. Wm. & Mary, at H.-S. 
Harvard vs. Dartmouth, at Cambridge. 
Haverford vs. Trinity, at Haverford. 
Hastings vs. Wesleyan, at Lincoln. 
Hiram vs. Mt. Union, at Alliance. 
Iowa State C. vs. Iowa, at Iowa City. 
Kan. St. Agri. vs. U. of Ark., at K.C. 



Knox vs. Beloit, at Galesburg. 
Lehigh vs. Frank. & Mar., at Beth'm. 
La. State U. vs. Southw'n U., at Hous. 
Mass. Agri. vs. Springf'd T.S., at Spr. 
Miami vs. U. of Cin., at Cincinnati. 
Monmouth vs. Lake Forest, at Monm'h. 
New York U. vs. Wesleyan, at N. Y. 
N. C. A. & M. vs. Wake For., at W.F. 
Northw'n vs. Oshkosh, at Watertown. 
Oberlin vs. Ohio State, at Oberlin. 
Occidental vs. Pomona, at Pomona. 
Ohio Wes. vs. Otterbein, at Delaware. 
Olivet vs. Albion, at Albion. 
Penn. State vs. Navy, at Annapolis. 
Purdue vs. Rose Poly, at Lafayette. 
Richmond vs. IT. of Md., at Richmond. 
Ripon vs. Carroll, at Ripon. 
Roanoke vs. Fishb'e M.I., at Wayn'b'O'. 
Rutgers vs. Ursinus, at New Brunsw'k. 
Scio vs. Bethany, at Bethany. 
Shurtleff vs. Lincoln, at Alton. 
Southw'n P.U. vs. U. of Tenn, at Knox. 
State U. of Iowa vs. Ames, at Iowa C. 
Stevens vs. Rens. Poly, at Troy. 
St. John's vs. Johns Hopkins, at Balto. 
St. Joseph vs. Mornings'e, at Dubuque. 
St. Louis U. vs. U. of Mo., at St. L. 
Transylvania vs. Ky. State, at Lex. 
Tufts vs. Bowdoin, at Portland. 



276 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



SATURDAY, NOVEMBER IS— (Continued). 

Middlebury, at Schenectady. •Vanderbilt vs. U. of Miss., at Nashv'e. 
Va. P.I. vs. Mor.-Har. C, at Blacks'g. 
Washburn vs. St. Mary's, at Topeka. 
Wasb. & Jeff. vs. Pittsburg, at Pitts. 
Wasb. & Lee vs. U. of N.C., at Nor'k. 
Wasb. U. vs. Drake, at Des Moines. 
Waynesb'g vs. Cal. State Nor., at Cal. 
West'n Md. vs. Md. Ag., at Coll. P'k. 
West'n Res. vs. Carnegie T., at Cleve. 
W. Va. Wes. vs. Masball, at Hunt'ton. 
Wbitman vs. Wash. State, at Pullman. 
Worcester Poly vs. Holy Cr., at Wor. 
Yale vs. Princeton, at New Haven. 



Union vs. 

U of Ala. vs. U. of South, at Birm 
U of Col. vs. Utah, at Salt Lake City. 
U. of 111. vs. Northwestern, at Urbana. 
U. of Mont. vs. Gonzaga, at Spokane. 
U of Neb. vs. Kansas U., at Lawr'ce. 
U. of Oregon vs. U. of Wash., at Port. 
U of Pa vs. Mich., at Ann Arbor. 
U of So. Cal. vs. Whittier, at Los A. 
U of S. D. vs. Hamlme, at Shaw F'ld. 
U. of Texas \s. Auburn, at Austin. 
U of Wis. vs. U. of Minn., at Mad'n. 
U. of Wvo. vs. Denver U., at Laramie. 



MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20. 
Southw'n P.U. vs. Maryville. at Mary v. 1 Wabash vs. Notre Dame, at Crawf'v'e. 
Tulane vs. Miss. A. & M., at Starkv'e. ! 



Tex. A. & M. 



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 21. 

vs. La. St. U., at Coll. S. 



THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23. 
"Talladega vs. Tuskegee, at Talladega. 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 24. 
Kan. S. Ag vs. Okla. A. & M., at Man. [Southern U. vs 
Knox vs. Lombard, at Galesburg. |Wm. Jewell vs 



Howard, at Greensb'o. 
Mo. Wes., at Cameron. 



SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 25. 



Antioch vs. Muskingum, at Yellow Sp. 
Army vs. Navy, at Philadelphia. 
Brown vs. Trinity, at Providence. 
Buchtel vs. Heidelberg, at Akron. 
Bueknell vs. Haverford, at Lewisburg. 
Carlisle vs. Johns Hopkins, at Balto. 
Case vs. Wooster. at Cleveland. 
Chris. Bros. vs. Jonesboro, at Memp's. 
DePauw vs. Earlbam, at Greencastle. 
Dickinson vs. Delaware, at Newark. 
Eastern vs, Rock Hill, at Manassas. 
Gallaudet vs. Md. Agri., at Coll. Park. 
Georgetown vs. U. of Md., at Wash. 
Grinnell vs. Cornell, at Mt. Vernon. 
Harvard vs. Yale, at Cambridge. 
Hiram vs. Geneva, at Hiram. 
Indiana vs. Purdue, at Bloomington. 
Icwa State vs. Drake, at Des Moines. 
Lehigh vs. Lafayette, at Bethlehem. 
Marietta vs. Otterbein. at Marietta. 
Miami vs. Western Reserve, at Oxford. 
Northwest'n vs. U. of la., at Iowa C. 



Ohio Wes. vs. Denison, at Delaware. 
Pacific U. vs. Willamette, at Salem. 
Rens. Poly vs. Carnegie T., at Pitts. 
Richmond vs. Ran. -Macon, at Richm'd. 
Roanoke vs. Wake Forest, at Wake F. 
Rutgers vs. Stevens, at Hoboken. 
Scio vs. Geneva, at Beaver Falls. 
South west'n P.U. vs. Tran., at Clarks. 
St. John's vs. Wash. Coll., at Balto. 
St. L. U. vs. Springfield Nor., at St. L. 
Syracuse vs. Ohio State, at Columbus. 
U. of Chic. vs. U. of Wis., at Chicago. 
U. of Cin. vs. Wittenb'g, at Cincin'ti. 
U. of 111. vs. Minnesota, at Urbana. 
U. of Idaho vs. U. of Ore., at Eugene. 
U. of Mich. vs. Nebraska, at Lincoln. 
U. of Mo. vs. Kansas, at Columbia. 
U. of Ore. vs. U. of Idaho, at Eugene. 
Wash. & Jeff. vs. Villanova, at Wash. 
Wash. U. vs. Arkansas, at St. Louis. 
W. Va. U. vs. W. Va. Wes., at Morg'n. 



WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29. 

Parsons vs. Iowa Wes., at Fairfield. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



277 



THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 30. 



Allegheny vs. Buchtel, at Akron. 
Baylor vs. Texas A. & M., at Coll. Sta. 
Brown vs. Carlisle, at Providence. 
Bucknell vs. Ursinus, at Reading. 
Carnegie T. vs. Kenyon, at Columbus. 
Case vs. Western Res., at Cleveland. 
Central Coll. vs. Westmins'r, at Fult'n. 
Cent. U. of la. vs. Penn. C, at Osk'a. 
Citadel vs. U. of S. C, at Charlest'n. 
Colgate vs. Rochester, at Rochester. 
Coll. of Char. vs. U. of Fla.. at Jacks. 
Col. State vs. U. of Wyo., at Ft. Col's. 
Davidson vs. U. of Ala., at Birm'ham. 
Dickinson vs. Lafayette, at Easton. 
Fairniount vs. Ottawa, at Wichita. 
Gettysb'g vs. Frank. & Mar., at Lane. 
Hastings vs. Peru Nor., at Hastings. 
Johns Hopkins vs. West. Md., at Balto. 
Kan. St. Ag. vs. W T ashburn, at Top'a. 
Lehigh vs. Georgetown, at Washington. 
La. State U. vs. Arkansas, at Little R. 
Marietta vs. Ohio TJ., at Marietta. 
Mich. Agri. vs. Wabash, at E. Lansing. 
Miss. A. & M. vs. U. of Miss., at Jack. 
Mt. Union vs. Ohio North., at Alliance. 
Muhlenb'g vs. Carlisle Res., at Allen'n. 
Ohio State vs. Cincinnati, at Cincin'ti. 
Otterbein vs. Wittenb'g, at Springfield. 
Ouachita vs. Henderson, at Arkadel'a. 
Penn. State vs. U. of Pitts., at Pitts. 



Roanoke vs. Med. Coll. of Ya., at R'ke. 
Rock H. vs. Fredericksb'g, at El. C. 
Rose Poly vs. Butler, at Indianapolis. 
Scio vs. W. Va. Wes., at Buchannon. 
Shurtleff vs. Millikiu, at Decatur. 
Southern U. vs. Bum. Coll., at Selina. 
St. John's vs. Va. M.A.. at Roanokf. 
St. Jos. vs. Coll. of P & .S., at Dub'e. 
St. Mary's vs. Doane, at St. Mary s. 
Syracuse vs. St. Louis, at St. Louis. 
Talladega- vs. Straight U., at New Or. 
Transylvania vs. Central, at Lexingt'n. 
Trinity vs. Daniel Baker, at Waxah'e. 
U. of Ark. vs. U. of La., at Little Rk. 
U. of Col. vs. Col. S. of M.. at Denver. 
U. of Detroit vs. St. Ignatius, at Chic. 
U. of Idaho vs. U. of Utah, at S. L. C. 
U. of Mont. vs. Mont. State, at Boze'n. 
U. of Oregon vs. Mult. A.C., at Port'd. 
U. of Pa. vs. Cornell, at Philadelphia. 
U. of South vs. Vanderbilt, at Nashv. 
U. of Texas vs. Okla. U.. at Austin. 
U. of Va. vs. N. C. U., at Richmond. 
Va. Poly vs. N. C. A. & M.. at Norf'k. 
Wash. <fc Lee vs. Tulane. at New Or. 
Waynesb'g vs. Bethany, at Waynesb'g. 
W. Va. vs. Denison, at Morgantown. 
Whitman vs. Ore. Agri., at Walla W. 
Wm. Jewell vs. Drury, at Springfield. 



SATURDAY, DECEMBER 2. 
IT. of So. Cal. vs. Pomona, at Los Angeles. 



SATURDAY, DECEMBER 9. 

Tulane vs. La. State, at Baton Rouge. 



278 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



What a Foot Ball Player Should Wear 

The foot ball player, in the eyes of the spectators at most games, 
is a hero. He seems to possess in their eyes attributes that are dif- 
ferent from the ordinary run of men. Is it not well, therefore, that 
this man who is regarded as a hero should appear before those who 
admire him in the best possible manner? He can only do so if he 
has on a uniform and is equipped as a foot ball player should be 
and in an outfit that is suitable for the game he is playing: After 
the experience of thirty years and over in catering to foot ball teams, 
Spalding knows pretty accurately what they require, and that is why 
newly organized teams go there in increasing numbers to ask for 
advice as to the outfits they should purchase. 



CLOTHING. 

The old style material of moleskin trousers is being succeeded by 
a light, special canvas, with padded hips and knees and cane strips 
in the thighs. These trousers can be bought 
in best quality, No. VT, at $2.50 per pair, and 
other grades at $1.75, $1.50, $1.00 and 75 cents 
per pair. 

Jerseys have largely taken the place of the 
canvas jacket, but the jack- 
ets are still made for those 
who prefer them. Jackets 
cost 50 cents and $1.25 each. 
The very best quality Spald- 
ing jersey, full fashioned, 
can be purchased at $4.00 
each, also other grades at 
$3.00, $2.50 and $2.00 each, and 
for the small amateur teams 
at $1.00 and $1.25 each. Lea- 
ther or canvas pads are now 
frequently used on shoulders 
and elbows. These can be 
bought for 25 cents and 50 
cents each. 

The canvas jacket is often used with combina- 
tion suit known as the " Spalding 'Varsity Union 
Suit," the jacket and trousers being connected 
at the waist with a oroad elastic belt. The pants are padded in the thighs 
with reeds. This suit conforms to each movement of the wearer's body 
and makes an ideal outfit. The price is $5.00 and $3.50. 

Although the roughness of the game has been practically eliminated 
by the now rules, still shin guards and shoulder pads are sometimes 
needed. The shin guards cost 40 cents, 50 cents, $1.00, $1.50 and $2.00 per 
pair. The shoulder pads, No. B, designed by Glenn S. Warner of Cornell, 
are made to fit the player's shoulder, and padded heavily both inside 
and out with wool felt. We also have a molded soft leather-covered 
pad, with selvage left so it can be sewed on the jersey and fitted with 
adjustable laces and elastic. 

The Spalding sweaters are known to every foot ball player in the 
world. Their No. AA quality is the heaviest sweater made and costs 
$8.00 each, other good qualities ranging in prices from $3.50 to $6.00. 





No. VT. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



279 




No. Y. 




Spalding foot ball stockings are made of a special weave and adopted by 
foot ball players generally. The best, striped, 
cost $1.75; plain, $1.50; other grades at 25 cents, 
40 cents, 60 cents, 80 cents and $1.00 per pair. 

The Spalding Combined Adjustable Shoul- 
der Pads and Collar Bone Protectors are new 
this season. The No. YP has molded leather 
shoulder pieces, felt padded, double thick- 
ness felt collar-bone protectors and adjusting 
straps. They cost 
$4.00 each. The No. 
Y is same as No. YF 
but without collar- 
bone protectors 
and cost $3.00 each. 
No. MF, same as 
YF, moleskin in- 
stead of leather, 
, costs $2.00 each. 

The old style head 
harness that used to 
be so hard and heavy 
has been retired in 
favor of a lighter 
and more pliable 
model. Spalding 
has produced a new one this year that gives complete satisfaction and 
still is almost as light as a feather on the head. The very best kind made 
cost $4.00 each, and other grades are $3.00, $2.00 and $1.00 each. 

To those who generally prefer padding in the knees of the trou- 
sers, "Spalding's New Improved Foot Ball Knee Pad," made entirely 
of felt and shaped to conform with the curve of the knee, with leather 
straps for fastening under the knee, is ideal. This 
is the invention of one of the most prominent foot 
ball trainers in the country and will be used exten- 
sively the coming season. They cost 
$2.00 per pair. 

Spalding foot ball shoes are recog- 
nized as the standard by foot ball 
players everywhere. They are made 
by shoemakers who do nothing else 
but make athletic shoes year in and 
year out and who become thoroughly . 
familiar with the various details as 
to what is needed. The very best 
Tsr n a Spalding shoe costs $8.00 per pair and M „ ttt> 

iyVm ^' is exclusively bench made. Other ^°' *^ r ' 

foot ball shoes can be purchased at $7.50, $5.00 and $3.50 per pair. The 
'Varsity foot ball shoe at $5.50 is equipped with Spalding football ankle 
brace, which was designed by the famous Mike Murphy, the celebrated 
trainer of University of Pennsylvania. It absolutely prevents turning of 
the ankle and affords most absolute protection against the spraining of 
the ankles and at the same time does not interfere with the speed of the 
player. The " Club Special " shoe at $5.00 is extremely light and made 
of very best black calfskin. The "Amateur Special " shoe is machine 
made, of very good quality black calfskin, and costs $3.50 per pair. 

Spalding's npw foot ball catalogue contains pictures and prices of 
everything needed for the game and is indispensable to every player. 
A postal addressed to the nearest Spalding store (see list on inside 
front cover) will bring one by return mail. 





OFFICIAL RULES FOR ALL ATHLETIC SPORTS. 

The following" list contains the Group and the Number of the book of 
Spalding's Athletic Library in which the rules wanted are contained. See 
front pages of book for complete list of Spalding's Athletic Library. 



Event. 



All-Round Atnletic Cham- 
pionship 

A. A. U. Athletic Rules .... 

A. A. U. Boxing Rules 

A. A. U. Gymnastic Rules. . 
A. A. U. Water Polo Rules. 
A. A. U. Wrestling Rules. . . 

Archery 

Badminton 

Base Ball 

Indoor 

Basket Ball, Official 

Collegiate 

Women's 

Water 

Basket Goal 

Bat Ball 

Betting - 

Bowling 

Boxing — A. A. U., Marquis 

of Queensbury, London 

Prize Ring 

Broadsword (mounted) 

Caledonian Games 

Canoeing 

Children's Games 

Court Tennis 

Cricket 

Croquet 

Curling 

Dog Racing 

Fencing 

Foot Ball 

A Digest of the Rules 

Association (Soccer) 

English Rugby 

Canadian 

Golf 

Golf-Croquet 

Hand Ball 

Hand Polo 

Hand Tennis 

Hitch and Kick 

Hockey 

Ice 

Field 

Garden 

Lawn 

Parlor 

Ring 

Ontario Hockey A§s'n 

Indoor Base Ball 

Intercollegiate A. A. A. A. . 

I.-C. Gymnastic Ass'n 

Lacrosse 

U. S. I.-C. Lacrosse League 4 



o 
u 


No. 







12 


182 


12 


12a 


12 


12 a 


12 


12a 


12 


12a 


12 


12a 


11 


248 


11 


188 


1 


1 


9 


9 


7 


7 


7 


323 


7 


7a 


12 


55 


6 


188 


12 


55 


12 


55 


11 


341 


14 


162 


12 


55 


12 


55 


13 


23 


11 


189 


11 


194 


3 


3 


11 


138 


11 


14 


12 


55 


14 


165 


2 


2 


2 


344 


2 


2a 


12 


55 


2 


332 


5 


5 


6 


188 


11 


13 


10 


188 


11 


194 


12 


55 


6 


304 


6 


6 


6 


154 


6 


188 


6 


188 


6 


188 


12 


55 


6 


256 


9 


9 


12 


339 


15 


345 


8 


201 


8 


8 



Event. 



Lawn Bowls 

Lawn Games 

Lawn Tennis 

Obstacle Races 

Olympic Game Events — Mar- 
athon Race, Stone Throw- 
ing with Impetus, Spear 
Throwing, HellenicMethod 
of Throwing Discus, Dis- 
cus, Greek Style for Youths 

Pigeon Flying 

Pin Ball 

Playground Ball 

Polo (Equestrian) 

Polo, Rugby 

Polo, Water (A. A. U.)..... 

Potato Racing !* ■ . . . . 

Professional Racing, Shef- 
field Rules 

Public Schools Athletic 

League Athletic Rules 

Girls' Branch ; including 
Rules for School Games. 

Push Ball 

Push Ball, Water 

Quoits 

Racquets 

Revolver Shooting 

Ring Hockey 

Roller Polo 

Roller Skating Rink 

Roque 

Rowing 

Sack Racing 

Shuffleboard 

Skating 

Skittles 

Snowshoeing 

Squash Racquets 

Swimming 

Tether Tenni3 

Three-Legged Race 

Volley Ball 

Wall Scaling....- 

Walking 

Water Polo (American) 

Water Polo (English) 

Wicket Polo 

Wrestling 

Y. M. C. A. All-Round Test. 

Y. M. C. A. Athletic Rules. . 

Y. M. C A. Hand Ball Rules. 

Y.M.C.A. Pentathlon Rules. 

Y.M.C. A. Volley Ball Rules. 



SS THE SPALDING! 



(TRADEMARK 



]E 




?S ©ffidffll 



fat®re@ll®gSate 3P©@t 3BaIl 





No. J5 ♦ • • Complete, $5.00 



This is the ONLY OFFICIAL 
COLLEGE FOOT BALL, 
and is used in every important 
match played in this country. 



GUARANTEED ABSOLUTELY 
IF SEAL OF BOX IS 
y UNBROKEN 




Each ball complete in sealed 
box, including leather case, 
guaranteed pure Para rubber 
bladder (not compounded), 
inflater, lacing needle 
and rawhide lace. 



k E GUARANTEE every J5 Spalding Foot Ball to be 
perfect in material and workmanship and correct 
in shape and size when inspected at our factory. 
If any defect is discovered during the first game in 
which it is used, or during the first day's practice 
use, and if returned at once, we will replace same 
under this guarantee. We do not guarantee against ordinary wear 
nor against defect in shape or size that is not discovered immedi- 
ately after the first day's use. <§ Owing to the superb quality of 
every Spalding Foot Ball, our customers have grown to expect a 
season's use of one ball, and at times make unreasonable claims 
under our guarantee 
which we will jy 'A/ ^^ — } • >j 




PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO | 

ANY COMMUNICATIONS 

ADDRESSED TO US 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



FOR COMPLETE LIST OF STORES 
SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER 
|Q OF THIS BOOK 



Prices in effect July 5, 1911.. Subject to change without notice. For Canadian prices see special Can; 



SWeTHESPALDINGI 




-M 



Spalding 

'College Special" 
Foot Ball 

Made of Specially Tanned Im- 
ported Grain Leather. 
Superior in style and quality 
to the many balls put on the 
market in imitation of our ' 
Official No. J5 Ball. Each 
ball put up in a sealed box 
with guaranteed pure Para 
rubber bladder (not com- 
pounded), lacing needle and 
rawhide lace. 

No. A. Each, $3.50 
zxxz 



I 



No. A. 



r 




Spalding 
College Foot Ball 

Selected fine grain leather 
y case. Each ball packed com- .. 
X plete in sealed box with guar- X 
X anteed pure Para rubber / 

bladder (not compounded), 

lacing needle and rawhide 

lace. Regulation size^ 

No. B. Each, $3.00 




Spalding 
College Foot Ball 

Grained cowhide case of ex- 
cellent quality. Each ball 
packed complete with guaran- 
teed pure Para rubber bladder 
(not compounded), rawhide 
lace and needle in sealed box. 
Regulation size. 

No. F. Each, $2.50 



Don't permit your Foot Ball 

to become water soaked and 

then expect it to keep in good 

playing condition. 



»C 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO | 

ANY COMMUNICATIONS 
ADDRESSED TO OS 



A. G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



FOR COMPLETE LIST OF STORES 

SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER 

OF THIS B001 



Prices in effect July 5, 1911. Subject to change without notice. For Canadian prices see special Canadian Catalogue 



SS THE SPALDING' 



Spalding 
College Foot Ball 

Good quality leather case, 
pebbled graining. Each ball 
packed complete with guar- 
anteed pure Para rubber blad- 
der (not compounded), raw- 
hide lace and needle in sealed 
box. Regulation size. 

No. S. Each, $2.00 




L--" 



Spalding 
College Foot Ball 

Leather case, pebbled grain- 
ing. Each ball is packed com- 
plete with guaranteed pure 
Para rubber bladder (not com- 
pounded), in sealed box 
Regulation size. 

No. D. Each, $1.25 



Don't permit your Foot Ball 

to become water soaked and 

then' expect it to keep in good 

playing condition.' 




Spalding 
College Foot Ball 

Well made leather case, peb- 
bled graining, Each ball is 
packed complete with guar- 
anteed pure Para rubber blad- 
der (not compounded) in 
sealed box. Regulation size. 

No. C. Each, $1.50 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO | 

ANY COMMUNICATIONS 

ADDRESSED TO US 



A. G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



| FOR COMPLETE LIST OF STOBES 

SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER 
OF THIS BOOK „ 



Prices in effect July 5, 1911. Subject to change without notice. For Canadian prices see special Canadian Catalogue 



XKe THE SPALDING 



*p^>^p^P 




Spalding College Foot Ball Clothing 

is made oj either canvas, drill or moleskin, 
specially manufactured for us, the curled 
hair and other padding is most carefully 
selected, real rattan reeds being a special 
feature, and we use ro metal eyelets, all 
being hand worked. 

The Spalding 'Varsity Union Suit 

Made up of our 'Varsity No VT Pants and No. 
VJ Jacket, connected by a substantial elastic 
belt. Highest grade material and workmanship 
throughout. It conforms to each movement of 
the body and makes an ideal outfit in every way. 
No VTJ. Suit, Price, $ 5. OO * #54.00 Doz. 
To satisfy the demand for a medium priced Union 
Suit, we are putting out this additional style,' 
made of lighter weight brown canvas and nar- 
rower elastic belt than in our No. VTJ. Well 
made and will give excellent satisfaction. 
No. PTJ. Suit. Price, S3.60 * $39.00 Doz. 



Spalding Special 'Varsity Foot Ball 
Trousers— Padded 

No. VT. The hips and knees are properly 
padded, according to our improved method, with 
pure curled hair and the thighs have cane strips. 
Absolutely best grade throughout 

Per pair, $2.50 • $27.00 Doz. 




No. VTJ ' 



Spalding Foot Ball Pants -Canvas 

No. I P. Extra quality brown canvas, soft finish, well padded throughout and 
cane strips at thighs. Per pair, $1.75 * $18.00 Doz. 

No. 2P. Good quality brown canvas, well padded and real cane strips 

at thighs Per pair, SI .50 it $15. 00 Doz. 

No. BP. Brown drill, correctly padded 1 .00 * 10.00 " 

No. XP. Brown drill, padded. Pair, 7 5c it $8.00 Doz. 

Spalding Foot Ball Pants— Moleskin 

No. OOR. Padded Drab moleskin Hips and knees 

padded with curled hair, and thighs have cane strips. 

Per pair, $5.00 * $51 00 Doz. 

Spalding Sleeveless Foot Ball Jackets 

No. VJ. 'Varsity,.* Light weight, brown canvas. 
Special quality. Each, $ 1 .25 * $13 20 Dcz. 

No 2. Good quality brown canvas. Well made 
throughout. Each, 50c. * $5.00 Doz. 




Juvenile Foot Ball Pants 

Furnished in following sizes only : 'waist 2U to 26, inclusive. 
No. 20P. Brown canvas, good quality; well padded and real cane .strips at thighs. Pair, 9 1 .25 

No. I 5P, Brown drill, correctly padded .80 

No. | 4 P. Brown drill, padded .70 



The prices printed in italics opposite items marked with it will be quoted only on orders for one half dozen or 
more. Quantity prices NOT allowed on items NOT marked with if 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO I 

ANY COMMUNICATIONS 
ADDRESSED TO US 



A. G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



FOR COMPLETE LIST OF STORES 

SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER 

OF THIS BOOK 



Prices in effect July 5, 1911. Subject to change without notice. For Canadian prices see special Canadian Catalogue 



THE$PALDJNGl S>)fRADE-MARK 



GUARANTEE? 
QUALITY 




SPALDING HEAD HARNESS 

Patent Applied fob 
Our Head Harness really protect They are- endorsed by the 
most prominent trainers in this country All Spalding Mead 
Harness conform exactly to the Rules of Intercollegiate Asso- 
ciation. We are the originators of the special back extension 

on Head Harness. 

No A. Firm tanned black leather, molded to shape, 
perforated for ventilation, leather sweat band and 
well padded. Adjustable chin strap. Presents a per- 
fectly smooth surface, and, while giving absolute 
protection, is one of the coolest and lightest made. 
When ordering, specify size of hat worn 

Each, $4.00 • $43.20 Doz. 
No B. Soft black leather top and sides, soft leather 
ear pieces, adjustable chin strap. Top padded with 
felt, leather sweat band and well ventilated. Sides 
stitched and felt padded with canvas lining. When 
ordering, specify -size.,of hat worn. 

" ' Each. S3.00 * $32.40 Doz. 

No. C. Soft black leather top. well ventilated; mole- 
skin sides and ear pieces, elastic chin strap. Nicely 
padded with felt, leather sweat band and substantially 
made. When ordering, specify size of hat worn 

Each. S2.00 • $21.00 Doz. 
No D. Brown canvas, nicely padded, but very light 
and cool to wear. When ordering, specify size of 
hat worn Each, S I .OO * $10.00 Doz 




fife 6 




Morrill Nose Mask 

None genuine which do not bear the name 
of Morrill and the date of patent Made of 
finest rubber and no wire or metal is used 
in its construction. A necessity on every foot 
ball team, and affords absolute protection to 
nose and teeth _ 

No I .Regulation style or size. Each, 50c.*#5. 
I B. Regulation style, youths' size. , 50c* 5 

0. Full size, with adjustable mouthpiece, 50c* 5 




,00 Doz 
.00 " 
.00 M 
^Oc* 5.00 " 



No OB. Youths' size, adjusta ble mouthpiece.. 

Spalding Patented Shin Guard „:;::::„ 

No. 30. Thoroughly ventilated, extremely light in 
weight Fitted with soft tanned leather fastening 
straps. ' " ' Per pair. S2.00 • $21 00 Doz. 

Spalding 
Foot Ball Shin Guards 

No 60. Black leather, backed 
up with real rattan reeds, felt 
padding, leather straps and bind- 
ing Pr. SI. 50* $16.50 Doz 
No. 12. Made of pebbled sheep- 
skin, well padded, black leather - ( 
straps J>r.. St. OO + $10.80 Doz&£l °" 
No 9. Canvas, length 11 inches, with reeds. 
" ' Pair. 5 Oc. * $5.00 Doz. 

No 8. Canvas, length 9 inches, with reeds. 
Pair. 40c. • $4.20 Doz. 

printed in italics opposite items marked with + will be 
or more Quantity prices NOT allowed on items 



Rubber Mouthpiece 

No 2. Bestqual-{j|^ 

ity Para rubber; 

perfect protec-X • * 

tion to mouth and ^«-_ H- 

teeth Each. 25c. * $2.60 Dot, 

No. A. Adjustable, separate, as suf> 
plied with Nos. and OB Mask. 

Each. 25c. * $2.50 Dot. 

VS ORDERING. SPECIFY WHETHER MOUTHPIECE (5 
REQUIRED FOR Nos. O or OB NOSE MASK 





Ho. 60 

The prices 



No. 9 



Spalding Thigh Guard 

Fiber, felt padded on 
edges. Light in weight. 
No TP. Pair, SI. OO , 

Spalding w 
New Improved 
Foot I 
Ball 
Knee' 
Pad 

No. KP. Made entirety 
of felt. Conforms with 
curve of the knee, and 
is the most effective an<f 
safest knee pad made. 
No. KP Pr..S2.QO*j^.00£fc 
quoted only on orders for one-Hatf dm^A-. 
NOT marked with it 





IFORCOMPLETE LIST OF STOBES 

SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER 
Of THIS BOOK 

Prices in effect July 5, 1911. Subject to change without notice. For Canadian prices *ee special Canadian Catalogue 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO I 

ANY COMMUNICATIONS 

ADDRESSED TO US 



A. G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



SKTHESPALDINGI 



ITRADE-MARK g Sty ES 



Spalding Combined Adjustable 

Shoulder Pads 

and Collar-Bone Protectors 

After consultation with some of the most prominent and successful 
j ftthtetic trainer s in this country, we have arranged to supply adjustable 
shoulder pads with and without the com- 
bination protection for collar-bone. These 
pads will be used by the players on the 
leading college teams during the coming 
season. They are made in exact accord- 
I ance with official regulations. 

No. YF. Molded leather shoulder pieces, 
felt padded, complete with special double 
thickness felt collar-bone protectors and 
lad justing straps to regulate size. 
' " ~ " . Each, S4.00 * $1,2.00 Doz. 
No. Y» Same as No. YF, but without col-. 
' lar-bone protectors ..Fitted with adjust- 
ing straps. Each, S3.0O if $30.00 Doz,, 
No. MF. Same as No. YF, but mole-i 
skin instead of leather. „ 
No. Y Each, $2.00 • $21.00 Doz., 






Spalding Collar-Bone Protectors Spalding Leather Covered Pads 




Gotten up after the 
design of a very suc- 
cessful athletic trainer. 
These protectors were 
thoroughly tested in 
actual play last season 

by some of the biggest college teams. Made in 

accordance with official regulations. Felt padded. 

No. LL. Large, leather. Ea., $2. OO if $21.00 Doz. 

No. LM. Medium, leather. " 2.O0* $21.00 Doz. 

No. CF. Smali, canvas. 1 .00 + $10.80 Doz. 

Spalding Improved Shoulder Pads 





.No. P 

No. B. Designed by Glenn S. Warner of Cornell. Made 
to fit shoulder. Heavily padded inside and out v/ith 
wool felt in accordance with decisions of Rules 
Committee. Endorsed by every player and trainer 
who has examined it. Each, $2.50 

No. D. Soft black leather covering, padded with heavy 
felt and fitted with adjusting laces ^nd elastic. Sel- 
vage left for attaching to jersey. 'Each, $ 1 .00 





Hand made and correctly 
padded. Elbow pads made 
extra thick. Shouldei 
pads are extra long, to 
give full protection. 
No " z Readily attached to any 

part of a jersey, but especially adapted to shoul- 
ders and elbows. Covered with tan leather and 
tufted padding which has all the softness of curled hair 
and durability of felt. 



No. I . Shoulder Pad. 
No. 2. Elbow Pad. . 



Each, 60c. • $5.00 Doz. 
" 60c. * 5.00 " 



Same as above, bat covered with brown canvas instead of leatlMfr 
No. 3. Shoulder Pad. Each, 25c. • $2.50 Doz. 



No. 4. Elbow Pad. 



25c. * 2.50' 



The prices printed in italics opposite items marked 

with it will be quoted only on orders for one-half dozen 

or more. Quantity prices NOT allowed on items NO T 

marked with if 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO | 
ANY COMMUNICATIONS 
ADDRESSED TO US < 



A.G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



FOR COMPLETE LIST OF STORES 

SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER 

OF THIS BOOK 



Prices in effect July 5, 1911, Subject to change without notice. For Canadian prices see special Canadian Catalogue 



XWeTHESPALDINGi 



Spalding Foot Ball Tackling Machine and Releasing Attachment 

We furnuh on application, to interested parties, blue prints, giving necessary measurements and showing how apparatus shouM 
be set up. Posts should be 21 feet apart, cross-beam 15 feet above ground. 

Uprights and cross-beam can be purchased at any sawmill. 
Prices for all other equipment necessary we list below. 

Tackling Dummy 
Heavy 10-oz. brown canvas, without joining at waist ; 
reinforced at bottom with heavy sole leather. Com- 
plete with heavy leather encircling strap for special 
reinforcement. At many of the prominent colleges 
a pair of foot ball trousers are put on the dummy and 
held secure by the encircling strap which w t e furnish 
with the dummy. " . "" Each, $16.00 

Releasing Attachment 

With pulley block to run on cross rod, spliced to con- 
necting rope. . * Each, $ I O.OO) 

Steel Cross Rod 

Threaded at both ends, complete with nuts and 
washers. . . . Each, $7. SO 





Guaranteed Rugby Foot Ball 
Bladders 

No OR. For No. J5 Ball. Ea. $ I OO 

P. ForNos. A, B and 
F Balls Ea 90c. 

No. R. ForNos. S, C 
and D Balls. 

Each. '75c. 

All rubber foot ball bladders bearing our Trade-Mark 
are made oj pure Para rubber (not compounded), and 
ere guaranteed perfect in material and workmanship. 
Note special explanation of guarantee on tag attached 
to each bladder 
Don't use month to inflate rubber bladders 

Foot Ball Lacing Needle 



No N. Made of annealed steel wire Each, 5c. 



Lawsoii Foot Ball Timer 

A continuous timer, arranged so that an 
entire half may be timed accurately, 
stopped during interruptions, and 
started again when play is resumed. 
Used also for timing other athletic 
events. Nickel case. Each S2.50 

"Club" Foot Ball Inf later. 



No 2. Made of polished brass, 

nickel-plated. Length of cylinder 10^ inches an<4 

diameter 1% inches. ." .Each, 50 c. 

Pocket Foot Ball Inflater 

No. 3. Made of brass, 
nickel-plated and pol- 
ished. Cylinder 5% 
inches long, diameter \ inch ; extreme length closed. 




7% inches. 



. Each, 25c. 



No. R. 



Rawhide Foot Bail Lace 

JEach, 5c. 



Spalding "Long Distance" Prepared Fiber Megaphones 




No. 3. 40-inch Cone, with metal 

piece 

No. 2X. 30-inch Cone, with handle. 
Stand only, for No. 3, extra. 



handle and mouth- 
Each, $3.50 
1.50 
3.0O 



Waterproof Cones (For Cheering, Etc.) 

No. O. 12-inch Waterproof Cone. Each.S .26 

No OX. 20-inch Waterproof Cone. " SO 

No. CX. Coxswains' complete with head harness. •-•- s f ,50 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO | 

ANY COMMUNICATIONS 
ADDRESSED TO US 



A. G.SPALDING & BRQS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



FOR COMPLETE LIST OF STORES 

SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER 

OF THIS BOOK 



Prices in effect July 5, 1911. Subject to change without notice. For Canadian prices see special Canadian Catalogue 



KMUHE SPALDING' 




No* AX Fxont View No. AX Sole 




No. A2-0S Sole 



SPALDING 

FOOT BALL 

SHOES 



SPALDING Foot Ball Shoes are worn by the 
players of every college and school team of .. 
any importance in this country, and notably by 
the following most successful teams : 

Yale, Princeton, Cornell, University of Penn- 
sylvania, Carlisle, West Point, Annapolis, 
Michigan, Chicago, Illinois, Wisconsin, Min- 
nesota, Nebraska, Indiana, Iowa, California, 
Leland Stanford, Missouri, St. Louis, Wash- 
ington, Arkansas*. 

Spalding Featherweight Shoe 

No. AX. Finest Kangaroo leather uppers, finest 
white oak soles. For fastest players only, not 
for general or hard usage. Finest materials 
throughout, hand sewed and a strictly bench 
made shoe. Special leather laces. 

Per pair, $8.00 • $90.00 Dot, 

Spalding Sprinting Shoe 

No. A2-0S. Kangaroo leather. Light in 
weight yet strongly made. Use this style 
shoe instead of No. AX- for ordinary play. 
Hand welted; a bench made shoe. Special 
leather laces. \. . Per pair, $7.50 

1 T I. , r " ' "• " ' I 

The prices printed in italics opposite items marked 

with -jr will be quoted only on orders for one-half dozen 

or more. Quantity prices NOT allowed on items NOT 

marked with -fr 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO I 

ANY COMMUNICATIONS 

ADDRESSED TO US 



A. G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



FOR COMPLETE LIST OF STORES 
SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER > 
OF THIS BOOK 



Prices in effect July & 



S«iMji«ci m> nange without notice. For Canadian prices see special Canadian Catalogue 



XKJHE SPALDING! 



OH 



SPALDING 

FOOT BALL 

SHOES 



Spalding 'Varsity Shoe 

No. A2-M. Finest black calfskin; thoroughly 
made. Special leather laces. Equipped with 
special ankle brace designed by Mike Murphy, 
the famous trainer. . . Pair, $5.50 

Club Special Shoe 
No. A2-S. Sprinting Shoe, light weight; black . 
calfskin, good quality, well made. Special 
leather laces. ., . . Pair, $5.00 

Amateur Special Shoe 

No. A-3. Black chrome leather, good quality, 
machine sewed. A very serviceable shoe. 

Pair, $3.50 * $39.00 Doz. 

Spalding Juvenile Foot Ball Shoes 

No. A-4. Made on our special boys' size lasts. 
Material and general construction similar 
otherwise to our regular line of men's shoes. 
Boys' sizes, 12 to 5, inclusive. Complete with 
leather cleats. . . . Pair, $2.50 

» """ ■ i 

The prices printed in italics opposite items marked 

with ic will be quoted only on orders for one-half dozen 

or more. Quantity prices NOT allowed on items NOT 

marked with it 




No. A2-M 



Illustrating Spalding] 
Foot Ball Ankle Brace 
with which we equip 
the No. A2-M style 
shoe. Designed by ! 
Mike Murphy, trainer, 
of the University of 
Pennsylvania team. 
Absolutely prevents 
turning of the ankle. [ 




kb^ 




No.A2-S 




No. A-3 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TOl 

ANY COMMUNICATIONS 
ADDRESSED TO US 



A. G.SPALDING &. BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



FOR COMPLETE LIST OF SJj 
SEE INSIDE FRONT COTE 
OF THIS BOOK 



Prices in effect July 5, 1911. Subject to change without notice. For Canadian prices see special Canadian Catalogue 



KMUHESPALDINGi 



Spalding Worsted Jerseys 

Following sizes carried In stock regularly In all qualities: 
28 to 44 Inch chest. Other sizes at an advanced price. 

We allow two inches for stretch in all our Jerseys, and sizes are 
marked accordingly. It is suggested, however, that for very heavy 
men a size about two inches larger than coat measurement be 

ordered to insure a comfortable Jit. 
<ttnf k f ftlnrs PLAIN COLORS— We carry in stock in all Spalding Stores our 
jiwvii VW,VI a line ol worsted jerseys (NOT Nos. 12XB, RJ, 6 or 6X ) in following colors: 

Navy Blue Black Gray Maroon 

<sn*>rial Arriprc We also furnish, without extra charge on special orders lor one-hall 
avcuai viuus doMi or more no| carricd h slocR md NQT suppHed ;„ Nos , 2XB> 

6 or 6X, (he following colors. On orders for less than one-hall dozen 10 per cent, will 

be added to regular price. 

White Scarlet Dark Green Yellow 

Cardinal Royal Blue Irish Green Seal Brown 

Orange Columbia Blue Purple __ X)ld Gold 

Other colors than as noted above to order only in any qualitv (EXCEPT Nos. 12XB. 6 juid 

6X). 50c. each extra. 

N. B.— We designate three shades which are sometimes called RED. They are Scarlet, 

Cardinal and Maroon. Where RED is specified on order, Cardinal will be supplied. 

SPALDING INTERCOLLEGIATE JERSEY 

This jersey we consider in a class by itself. No other manufac- 
turer makes a garment of anywhere near the same gr"de. We 

recommend it to those who really want the best. 
No. I P. Full regular made; that is, fashioned or knit to exact 
shape on the machine and then put together by hand, altogether 
different from cutting them out of a piece of material and sew- 
ing them up on a machine, as are the majority of garments j 
known as Jerseys. Special quality worsted. Solid colors. 
Each, S4.00 * $42.00 Doz. 
No. I OP. Special quality worsted, 
fashioned. Solid colors 

Each, $3.00 * $30.00 Doz. 

No. I 2P. Good quality worsted ; solid colors. ' " 2 . 5 O * $25. 20 ' ' 

No. 1 4 P. Worsted, solid colors. . 2.00 * $21 00 " 

No. I 2XB. Boys' Jersey. Worsted. Furnished in sizes 26 to 34 inches 

chest measurement only. Solid colors only : Navy Blue, Black, Gray 

and Maroon. No special orders. " .Each, S2.00 -fr $21.00 Doz. 

SPECIAL MILITARY COLLAR JERSEY 

No. RJ. Special quality worsted, fashioned. Solid stock colors. Straight 
' collar, one inch high. Not carried in stock. Each, $3.00 

SPECIAL NOTICE. We will furnish any of the above solid color 
Jerseys (except Nos. 12XB, 6 and 6X), with one color body and another color 

(not striped) collar and cuffs in stock colors only at no extra charge. Nos ip lop and 12P 




Jerseys are being used more and more 
by foot ball players instead of canvas 
jackets. On account of the special 
Spalding knit they are very durable, and 
at the same time they offer no restraint 
on the free movement of the player. 




SPALDING COTTON JERSEYS 

No. 6. Cotton, good quality, fashioned, roll collar, full length 
sleeves. Colors: Black, Navy Blue, Gray and Maroon only. 

-Each, $ I .OO * $10.80 Doz. 
No. 6X. Cotton, same as No. 6, but with striped sleeves in fol- 
lowing combinations only : Navy with White or Red stripe ; 
Black with Orange or Red stripe; Maroon with Whife stripe. 
Each, $i.25* $13.20 Doz. 



Woven Letters, Numerals 
or Designs 

We weave into our best grade Jer- 
seys, No. IP, Letters, Numerals 
and Designs in special colors as 
desired. Prices quoted on appli- 
cation. Designs submitted. 

PRICES SUBJECT TO 
ADVANCE WITHOUT NOTICE 



The prices printed in italics opposite items marked with * will be quoted only on orders for one-half dozen 
or more. Quantity prices NOT allowed on items NOT marked with * 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO | 

ANY COMMUNICATIONS 

ADDRESSED TO US 



y 



A. G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



FOR COMPLETE LIST OF STORES 

SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER 

OF THIS BOOK 



Prices in effect July 5. 19H. Subject to change without notice. For Canadian prices see special Canadian Catalogue 



SsKTHE SPALDING I 



lTRADE-MARK G Sn s 



Spalding 
Striped 
Jerseys 

Following sizes carried In stock regu- 
larly In all qualities: 28 to 44 inch 
chest. Other sizes at an advanced price. 

We alhw two inches for stretch in all our 
Jerseys, and sizes are marked according- 
ly. It is suggested, however, that for very 
heavy men a size about two inches larger 
than coat measurement be ordered to in- 
sure a comfortable fit. 





No S noFXSHdT2FX' 



No. I OPX. Special quality worsted, 
fashioned; solid stock color body, 
with stock color striped sleeves, 
usually alternating two inches of 
same color as body, with narrow 
stripes of any other stock color. 
Colors as noted. 

Each, $3.25 * $33.00 Doz. 

No. I 2PX. Good quality worsted; 
solid color body, with striped 
sleeves, usually alternating two 
inches of same color as body, with 
narrow stripes of some other color. 
Colors as noted. 

Each, $2.75 * $30.00 Doz. 



STOCK COLORS: 
Black and Orange 
Navy and White 
Black and Scarlet 
Royal Blue and White 
Columbia Blue and White 
Scarlet and White 
Maroon and White 

Second color mentioned 
is for body stripe or for 
stripes on sleeves. Other 
colors than as noted 
above to order only, not 
more than two colors in 
any garment, 50c. each 
extra. 

PRICES SUBJECT TO 

CHANGE WITHOUT 

NOTICE 




No. I 2PW. Good quality worsted; 

solid stock color body and sleeves 

with 6-inch stock color stripe 

around body. Colors as noted. 

Each, $2.75 • $30.00 Dpz. 



The prices printed in italics opposite items marked with * will be quoted only on orders for one-half dozen 
or more. Quantity prices NOT allowed on items NOT marked with * 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO | 

ANY COMMUNICATIONS 

ADDRESSED TO US 



AG. SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



FOR COMPLETE LIST OF STORES 

SEE INSIDE FRONT COVEB 

OF THIS BOOK 



Prices in effect July 5, 1911. Subject to change without notice. For Canadi 



lian prices see special Canadian Catalogue 



SWeTHESPALDINGI 



Spalding Jacket Sweaters 

Sizes: 28 to 44 Inches chest measurement. 

We allow four inches for stretch in all our sweaters, and sizes are marked 
accordingly. It is suggested, however, that for very heavy men a size about 
two inches larger than coat measurement be ordered to insure a comfortable fit. 




No. VG. Showing special trimmed edo* 
Ing and cuffs supplied, If desired, on 
Jacket sweaters at no extra charge. 




BUTTON FRONT 

No. VC. Best quality 
worsted, heavy weight, pearl 
buttons. Carried in stock 
in Gray or White only. See 
list below of colors supplied 
on special orders. 
Each, 86.00 * $63.00 Doz. 
No. DJ. Fine worsted, 
standard weight, pearl but- 
tons, fine knit edging. Car- 
ried in stock in Gray or White 
only. See list below of colors 
supplied on special orders. 
Each, 85. OO* $5J* 00 Doz, 
No. VK. Special broad knit, 
good quality worsted, pearl 
buttons. Carried in stock in 
Gray or White only. See 
list below of- colors supplied 
on special orders. 
Each, $5.00 * $54.00 Doz. 

WITH POCKETS 

No. VCP. Best quality 
worsted, heavy weight, pearl 
buttons. Carried in stock in 
Gray or White only. See list 
below of colors supplied on 
special orders. With pocket 
on either side, and a partic- 
ularly convenient and popu- 
lar style for golf players. 
Each, 8 6 . O * $69. 00 Doz, 

Shaker Sweater 

No. 3J. Standard weight, 
Shaker knit, pearl buttons. 
Carried in stock and supplied 
only in Plain Gray. f 
Each, S3.60* $39.00 Doz. 





GDIT1 h I ADniTDC ■!» addilloa to dock colors mentioned, we also supply any ol the sweaters listed en this page (except No, W) 
dllA/lriL UIU/Llw without extra charge, oa special orders only, not carried hi stock, ia any ol the following colors: 

MAROON WAVY BLUE DARK GHEE* 

SCARLET COLUMBIA BLUE SEAL BROWN 

Other colors 1o order only in any quality, 50c each extra. 

SPECIAL NOTICE— W« will furnish any of tha solid color sweaters listed en this page with one color body snd 

another color (not striped) collar and cuffs in any of the above colors on special order, at no extra charge. This doee 

not apply to the No. 3 J Sweater. 



CARDINAL 



Th* prices printed in italics opposite items marked with if will be quoted only on orders for one-half dozen or 
^~— more. Quantity prices NOT allowed on items NOT marked with ic 



P80MPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO 

ANY COMMUNICATIONS 

ADDRESSED TO US 



A.G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



FOR COMPLETE LIST OF STORES 

SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER 

OF THIS BOOK 



'Prices in effect July 5, 1911. Subject to change without notice. For Canadian prices see special Canadian Catalogue 



SK THE SPALDING' 



$QM 



(TRADE-MARK ^ffif 



Spalding "Highest Quality" Roll Collar Sweaters 

Worsted Sweaters. Special quality wool, exceedingly soft and pleasant to wear. Full 
fashioned to body and arms and put together by hand, not simply stitched up on a 
machine as are the majority of garments sold as regular made goods. 

All made with 9-inch roll collars, ^^ -NflvA. 

Sizes 28 to U inches. 
We allow four inches for stretch in all onr sweat- 
ers, and sizes are marked accordingly. It is sag* 
gested, however, that lor very heavy men a size 
•boot two inches larger than coat measurement be 

ordered to insure a comfortable fit 
PLAIN COLORS— Sweaters on this page are 
Supplied in any of the colors designated, at regu- 
'"- prices. Other colors to order only in any 

ity, 50c. each garment extra. 
SPECIAL ORDERS- In addition to stock] 
colors mentioned, we also supply any of the sweat- 
ers listed on this page without extra charge, on 
special orders only, not carried in stock, in any 

ol the following colors : 
[Black Cardinal Seal Brown 

Maroon Nary Dark Green 

I Scarlet Columbia Blue 

N. B.— We designate three shades which are some- 
times called RED. They are Scarlet, Cardinal, 
Maroon. Where RED is specified on order, we 

supply Cardinal. 
SPECIAL NOTICE— Solid color sweaters 
with one color body and another color (not striped) 
collar and culls furnished in any of the colors noted* 

on special order at no extra charge. 

No. AA. The proper style for use after heavy exercise, inducing c0piou9 perspiration, for reducing 

* weight or getting into condition for athletic contests. Particularly suitable also for Foot Ball and 

Skating. Heaviest sweater made. Carried in stock in White, or Gray_only. See list above of colors 

supplied on special orders. Each, $8.00 * $8b.00 Doz. 

No. A. "Intercollegiate." Colors same as No. AA. Special weight.' ' 6.00 * 66.00 "- 

No. B. Heavy weight. Colors same as No. A A 6.00 * 5U.00 " 




Shaker Sweater 

Good qual- 
ity ail wool 
sweater, 
shaker 
knit, well 
made 
through- 
out Sizes 
30 to 44 
inches. 
Standard 
weight, 
slightly 
lighter 
than No. 
B. Colors 
same as 
No. AA. 
33.50* 139.00 Doz. 




Spalding Combined Knitted 
Muffler and Chest Protector 




Front View 



No. W. Fancy knit; good weight, special quality 
worsted. Stock colors, White or Gray. Each,$l.50 
No. M. Special weight; highest quality worsted. 
Stock colors, White or Gray. -Each, $ 1 .00 

Prices Subject to Change Without Notice. 
The prices printed in italics opposite items marked 
with -k will be quoted only on orders for one-half 
dozen or more. Quantity prices NOT allowed on 
items NOT marked with if 




PROMPT ATTENTION 6IYEN TO 

ANY COMMUNICATIONS 

ADORESSEOTO OS 


A.G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 


! FOR COMPLETE LIST OF STORES 

SEE INSIDE FRONT COYER 

OF THIS BOOK 



Prices in effect July 5, 1911. Subject to change without notice. For Canadian prices see special Canadian Catalogue 



Knm THE SPALDING 



TRADE-MARK c S T ty ES 




Cuts on this page all show the No. WJ Sweater with collar turned 
in various shapes to suit the convenience and comfort of the wearer. 




17 OR automobiling, training purposes, 
* reducing weight, tramping during cold 
weather, golfing, shooting, tobogganing, 
snowshoeing. High collar may be turned 
down quickly, changing into neatest form 
of button front sweater. Sizes 28 to 44 
inches. Carried in stock in Gray and 
White only. See list below of colors sup- 
plied on special orders. 

No. WJ. Highest quality special heavy 
weight worsted. 

Each, $7.50 +$81.00 Dor. 

No. WDJ. Fine quality standard weight 
worsted. Same style as No. WJ, but 
lighter weight. 

Each, $6.00 * $63.00 Doz. 

The dozen prices printed in italics Will be quoted 
only on orders- for one-half dozen or more. 

We allow four inches for stretch in all our sweaters, 
and sizes are marked accordingly. It is suggested, 
however, that for very 
heavy men a size about 
two inches larger than 
coat measurement be or- 
dered to insure a com- 
fortable fit. 



SPECIAL ORDERS- 



■ In addition to stock colors mentioned, we supply these 
sweaters without extra charge, on special orders only, not 



carried in stock, in any of the following colors: 

Black Scadet Navy Dark Green 

Maroon Cardinal Columbia Blue Seal Brown 

'• B -— We designate three shades which are sometimes called RED. They are Scarlet, Cardinal, 
Maroon. Where RED is specified on order, we supply Cardinal. 
Plain colors, other than the above, to order only, 50c. each garment extra. 
IPECIAL NOTICE— Solid colored sweaters with one color body and another color (not 
triped) collarand cuffs furnished in any of the colors noted, on special order at no extra charge. 




PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO | 

ANY COMMUNICATIONS 
ADDRESSED TO US 



A.G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



FOR COMPLETE LIST OF STORES 

SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER 

OF THIS BOOK 



Prices in effect July 5, 1911. Subject to change without notice. For Canadian prices see special Canadian Cataloj 



SUBSTITUTE 



THE SRALDINGjgf TRADE-MARK 



QUALITY 



The Spalding Official Basket Ball 





THE ONLY 

OFFICIAL 

BASKET BALL 



GUARANTEE 



this ball to be perfect in ma- 
terial and workmanship and 
correct in shape and size 
when inspected at our fac- 
tory. If any defect is dis- 
covered during the first game 
in which it is used, or during 
the first day's practice use, 
and, if returned at once, we 
will replace same under this 
guarantee. We do not guar- 
antee against ordinary. wear 
nor against defect in shape or 
size that is not discovered im- 
mediately after the first day's 

use. 
Owing to the superb quality 
of our No. M Basket Bail, our 
customers have grown to ex- 
pect a season's use of one ball, 
and at times make unreason- 
able claims under our guar- 
antee, which we willnot allow. 
A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 



^"^^ FFICIALLY ADOPTED AND STANDARD. The cover is made in four sections, with 
m ^^ capless ends, and of the finest and most carefully selected pebble grain English leather. 

B m We take the entire output of this superior grade of leather from the English tanners, and 

m W in the Official Basket Ball use the choicest parts of each hide. Extra heavy bladder made 

^L W especially for this ball of extra quality pure Para rubber (not compounded). Each ball 

^^^^r packed complete, in sealed box, with rawhide lace and lacing needle, and guaranteed per- 
fect in every detail. To provide that all official contests may be held under absolutely fair and uniform 
conditions, it is stipulated that this ball must be used in all match games of either men's or women's teams. 
No. M. Spalding " Official" Basket Ball. Each, $6.00 



Extract Irom Men's Official Rule Book 

Rule II— Ball. 
Sec. 3. The ball made by A. G. Spald- 
ing & Bros, shall be the official ball. 
Official balls will be sj& ffciA ?^ 
stamped as herewith, f J^KotTs | 
and will be in sealed KJhss^xkS^ 
boxes. ^gKEiS^ 

Sec. i The official ball must be 
used in all match games. 



Extract from 
Official Collegiate Rule Book 

The Spalding Official Basket | 
Ball No. M is the official 
ball of the /-frlcnjJs. 
Intercollegi- ^hSs-et**> 
ate Basket ' 
Ball Associa- 
tion, and must be used in all 
match games. 



Extract from Women's Official Rule Book 

Rule II— Ball. 
Sec. 3. The ball made by A. G. Spald- 
ing & Bros, shall be the official ball. 
Official balls will be ^SffctS^s. 
stamped as herewith, /^>rrrrs^> 
and will be in sealed ' 
boxes. 

Sec. 4. The official ball must be 
used in all match games. 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO 

ANY COMMUNICATIONS 

ADDRESSED TO US 


A.G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 


1 FOR COMPLETE LIST OF STORES 

SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER 

OF THIS BOOK 



Prices in effect July 5, 1911. Subject to change without notice. For Canadian prices see special Canadian Catalogue 



Sun THE SPALDING i 



(TRADE-MARK "JE? 



Spalding 

Official National league Ball 



(REG. U. S. PAT. OFF.) 

CORK CENTER 




ltf | ( Each, ... $1.25 
llO. 1 / Per Dozen, $15.00 



Official Ball of 

the Game for 
over Thirty Years 



This ball has the Spalding 
Patented" Cork Center, 

and it is made throughout in the 
best possible manner and of high- 
est quality material obtainable. 



Adopted by the National 
League in 1878, and the 

only ball used in Champion- 
ship games since that time. 
Each ball wrapped in tin- 
foil, packed in a separate 
box, and sealed in accord- 
ance with the latest League 
regulations. Warranted to 
last a full game when used 
under ordinary conditions. 



The Spalding "National Association'* 
Ball at $1.00 each is the highest 
grade Pure Para Rubber Center ball 
made. 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TOl 

ANY COMMUNICATIONS 
ADDRESSED TO US 



A.G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



FOR COMPLETE UST OF STORES 

SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER 

Of THIS BOOK 



Prices in effect July 5, 1911. Subject to change without notice. For Canadian prices see special Canadian Catalogue 



FOOT BALL ijft 



CORRESPONDENCE 



$10 



COACHING t "™ ara " Saj 

^lf^TOt? d W511*MA1* the old Cornell foot ball player and coach, 
xXMUMMl ^* vv ■*■■ «^* 9 who has been for many years athletic 
director of the Carlisle Indian School, has again been given this page to announce 
to foot ball men, and especially those who will take an active part in teaching the 
game the coming season, that he will continue his plan of assisting coaches and 
players, and teams which have no regular coach, by means of a practical, thorough 
and comprehensive correspondence course. 

This method of spreading foot ball knowledge has proved to be highly success- 
ful during the three years it has been in operation, and hundreds of foot ball men 
have profited by Mr. Warner's nineteen years of coaching experience during 
that time. 

This course will be the only written authority upon the game which is up to 
date, since the recent changes in the rules have rendered the few existing books 
on the subject entirely useless. 

Coach Warner's list of subscribers has increased greatly each year since he 
adopted this plan of foot ball coaching, and as he is generally acknowledged to be 
one of the country's leading foot ball coaches, his course of instruction will this 
year, as in past years, prove to be of inestimable value, not only to the smaller 
teams, but to coaches, players and teams of the highest class. 

Mr. Warner's plan of coaching is as follows: An exhaustive series of letters 
or pamphlets will be mailed to subscribers, covering in a thorough, scientific, yet 
simple manner, every department of the game. These pamphlets will be pro- 
fusely illustrated by numerous diagrams, drawings and snap-shots of prominent 
players in action. 

Among the subjects treated will be the following, on each of which pamph- 
lets or letters will be supplied: 

How players should be outfitted; How to train; How to avoid, 
treat and protect injuries; Tackling; Falling on the ball; Blocking 
and interfering; Punting; Drop -kicking; Place and goal kicking; 
Forward passing; Catching punts and passes; Separate pamphlet 
on how to play each position on the team; How to make and use 
all kinds of tackling and charging machines; Different plans and 
methods of teaching rudiments; A daily program of a week's 
work; Generalship; Defense for all kinds of formations; Systems 
of signals; Offense— consisting of over forty of the best plays, 
plainly diagrammed and explained, which are permitted by the 
new rules, and other plays, as fast as they are developed and used 
successfully. 

The latter manual or pamphlet, diagramming and explaining an entirely new 
system of offense, will alone be worth many times the subscription price of the 
course, which remains but $10.00. 

The course will be ready for mailing any time after September 1st. 

Send subscription or write for further particulars to 

GLENN S. WARNER, 

Athletic Director* Indian School, Carlisle, Pa. 

Mr. Walter Camp has endorsed and complimented Mr. Warner's former 
foot ball courses and there has not been a single dissatisfied subscriber since the 
course was first put out, while a great many have voluntarily written testimonials 
regarding its value, of which the following, from a prominent athletic director is 
a fair sample: 

September 21, 1909. 
Dear Sir: Your foot ball course reached me in due time. I have found it 
most interesting reading. It hits the mark, for it is intelligible and systematic. 
I have had the opportunity of observing coaches at work on our field and find in 
your manuals more than th? combined wisdom of them all. You have eliminated 
the non-essential. You prcceed by the simple and direct method, which shows that 
you know how to teach, and the results you have obtained in past years are the 
inevitable results of methods of this kind. 



KJHESPALDINGI 



«**» 



C^FlSllrfiillcr "Olympic Championship 
^P«111*11I& Running and Walking 



Shoe; 



All of these shoes are hand made. Finest kangaroo leather uppers and best white oak leather soles. They ar 
the same style shoes that we supplied to the American athletes who were so successful at the last Olmypic QafM 
in London, and they are worn in competition by all prominent athletes in this country. ' 








No. 2-0 



No. 14C 



No. I4W 



No 2-0. "Sprint" Running Shoe. Ex 

tremely light and glove fitting. Hand 
made steel spikes firmly riveted on 
This shoe is worn by all champions 
in sprint and short distance races. 
Per pair, $6.00 



Spalding "Olympic Championship" 



No. I 4C. "Distance" Running Sboe. 

For distance races on athletic 
tracks. Low, broad heel, flexible 
shank. Hand made steel spikes 
in sole. No spikes in heel. 

Per pair, S56.O0 



No. I4W. Walking Shoe. For 

competition and match races. This 
style shoe is used by all cham- 
pion walkers. Per pair, SB.OO 



Spalding St 



"Mctgcz&eav 
LONG DISTANCE 



Running Shoes 




Keep the uppers 

of all 

Running Shoe* 

•oft and pliable 

by using 

SPALDING 

WATERPROOF 

OIL. 

It will greatly add 

to wear of shoes. 

Per Can, 25c 




Spalding "Marathon" Long Distance Running Shoes 



No. MH. High cut but light in weight. Well finished 
inside so as not to hurt the feet in a long race, especially 
over uneven roads. Corrugated rubber tap sole, and 
light leather heel covered with rubber; special quality 
&lack calfskin uppers. Hand sewed A « Pair, 95. OO 



No MO. Low cut, otherwise same as No. MH. Tbi» 
shoe being low cut is lighter than the regular high cut 
of same grade. It is made so that it will not chafe, and 
is recommended where lightness is particularly de- 
sired in a Marathon run. Hand sewed Pair. S55.00 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO | 

ANY COMMUNICATIONS 

ADDRESSED TO US 



A.G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



FOR COMPLETE LIST OF STORES 

SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER 

OF THIS BOOt 



k in effect July 5, 1911. Subject to change without notice. For Canadian prices see special Canadian Catalogue 



KKJHE SPALDING' 



)TRADE-MARK g S t ty s 



SPALMWS 
M@w AHMetic (S@©ds Catalogm© 

THE following selection of items from Spalding's latest Catalogue will give 
an idea of the great variety of ATHLETIC GOODS manufactured 
by A. G. SPALDING & BROS. SEND FOR A FREE COPY. 
(See list of Spalding Stores on inside front cover of this book.) 



Ankle Brace, Skate . 54 
Ankle Supporter . . 13 
Athletic Library . 102. 103 
Attachments. Chest Weight 90 



Caddy , . 

Striking 

Skate 
Palls- 
Base 

Basket . 

Field Hockey . 

Foot, College 

Foot, Rugby , 

Foot, Soccer . 

Golf . . 

Hand . . 

Indoor Base , 

Lacrosse , 

Medicine 

Playground . 

Polo. Roller , 

Polo, Water , 

Push . . 

Squash . 

Volley . . 
Ball Cleaner, Golf 
Bandages. Elastic 
Bar Bells . . 
Bar Stalls . 
Bars- 
Horizontal . 

Parallel . 
Bases, Indoor . 
Bats, Indoor 
Belts— 

Elastic . 

Leather and Worsted 

Wrestling 
Bladders- 
Basket Ball , 

Foot Ball 

Striking Bag 
Blades, Fencing 
Caddy Badges . 
Caps- 
Outing .' 

Skull . . 

University 

Water Polo . 
Chest Weights 
Circle. Seven-Foot 
Clock Golf 
Corks, Running 
Cross Bars. Vaulting 
0i3cus, Olympic 
Discs- 
Marking. Golf 

Rubber Golf Shoe 
Disks, Striking Bag 
Dumb Bells 



13. 19 



PAGE 
Embroidery 
Exercisers- 
Elastic . 

Felt Letters 

Fencing Sticks 

Finger Protection, Hockey 64 

Flags- 
College . . 
Marking, Golf 

Foils. Fencing . 

Foot Balls- 
Association . 
College . 

Foot Ball Clothing 
Foot Ball Goal Nets 
Foot Ball Timer 

Boxing , 
Fencing , 
Golf 

Handball 
Hockey, Field 
Hockey, Ice 

Basket Ball 

Foot Ball 

Hockey, Field 

Hockey. Ii 

Lacrosse 
Goal Cage, Roller Polo 
Golf Clubs 
Golf Sundries 
Golfette . 

Athletic 

Golf 
Gymnasium. Home 
Gymnasium Board, Home 95 
Gymnasium.Home Outfits 96-97 
Hammers, Athletic . 65 
Hangers for Indian Clubs 88 
Hats, University 
Head Harness . -r- 
Health Pull . . 
Hob Nails . . . 
Hockey Pucks . 
Hockey Sticks, Ice . 
Hockey Sticks. Field 
Hoider. Basket Ball, Canvas, 28 
Hole Cutter, Golf 
Hole Rim, Golf . 
Horse, Vaulting 
Hurdles, Safety 
Indian Clubs . 
Inflaters— 

Foot Ball 

Striking Bag . 

Fencing . , 



76-:; 



55 55 



Foot Ball . . 
jiu Jitsu, Wrestling 

Javelins ... 

Jerseys . . 17,22, 

Knee Protectors 

Knickerbockers, Foot Ball 

Lace, Foot Ball 

Lacrosse Goods , 

Ladies- 
Fencing Goods 
Field Hockey Goods 
Gymnasium Shoe3 
Gymnasium Suits 
Skates, Ice . 
Skates. Roller 
Skating Shoes 
Snow Shoes . 

Lanes for Sprints 

Leg Guards- 
Foot Ball 
Ice Hockey . 
Polo. Roller . 

Letters- 
Embroidered , 
Felt . . 

Liniment, "Mike Murphy' 

Masks- 
Masseur, Abdominal 

Mattresses, Gymnasi 

Mattresses, Wrestlin 

Megaphones, . 

Mitts- 
Handball 



Str: 



gBag. 



Moccasi 

Monograms 

Mouthpiece. Foot Ball 

Mufflers, Knitted . . 

Needle, Lacing 

Nets- 
Golf Driving . 
Volley Ball . 

Numbers, Competitors' 

Pads- 
Chamois. Fencing 
Foot Ball 
Wrestling 

Paint. Golf 

Pants- 
Basket Ball 
Boys' Knee 
Foot Ball. College 
Foot Ball. Rugby 
Hockey, Ice. 
Running 

Pennants, College 

Pistol, Starter's 

Plastrons. Fencing. 

Plates- 
Teeing, Golf ... 76 

Platforms, Striking Bag 84,85 



Poles- 
.Ski . 



57. 58 



Vaulting . . 

Polo. Roller. Goods . 

Protectors- 
Abdomen . . 
Eye Glass 

Finger, Field Hockey 

Indoor Base Ball . 

Thumb, Basket Ball 
Protection, Running Shoes 69 
Pucks. Hockey, Ice 
Push Ball . 
Pushers, Chamois 
Quoits . . 
Racks, Golf Ball 
Racquets, Squash 
Rapiers, Fencing 
Referee's Whistle 

Exercising . 

Rowing Machines 

Sacks, for Sack Racing 

Sandals, Snow Shoe 

Sandow's Dumb Bells 

Scabbards, Skate . 

Score Books- 
Basket Ball . 

Shin Guards- 
Association 
College. . 
Field Hockey 
Ice Hockey 
Polo, Roller 

Shirts- 
Athletic . 

Shoes— ; 

Basket Ball 

Fencing . 

Foot Ball, Association 

Foot Ball. College 

Foot Ball, Rugby 

Foot Ball, Soccer 

Golf 

Gymnasium 
Shoes- 
Jumping 

Running 

Skating . 

Squash . 

Shot- 
Athletic . 
Indoor . 
Massage , 

Skates- 
Ice . 
Roller . 

Skate Bag . 

Skate Keys 

Skate Rollers 



Skate Straps . 

Skate Sundries . 

Skis . . . 

Snow Shoes 

Sprint Lanes . 

Squash Goods . 

Standards- 
Vaulting 
Volley Ball . 

Straps- 
For Three-Legged Race 
Skate . 

Sticks, Roller Polo . 

Stockings . . , 
Foot Ball 

Stop Boards 

Striking Bags . 

Suits- 
Base Ball. Indoor . 
Basket Ball . 
Gymnasium . 
Gymnasium. Ladies 
Running ' . 

Swimming 
Union Foot Ball . 
Water Polo . 

Supporters 
Ankle . . . 
Wrist . 

Suspensories . 

Sweaters . . .24, 

Swivels, Striking Bag 

Swords, Fencing. 

Swords. Duelling 

Tackling Machine . 

Take-Off Board 

Tape. Measuring, Steel 

Tees, Golf . 

Tights- 
Full . . . 
Full, Wrestling . 
Knee . . 

Toboggans , 

Toboggan Cushions . 

Toe Boards 

Trapeze, Adjustable 

Trapeze, Single 

Trousers— 
Y.M.C.A. . . 
Foot Ball 

Trunks- 
Velvet . . . 
Worsted . 

Uniforms- 
Base Ball, Indoor . 
Foot Ball . ; 

Wands, Calisthenic 

Watches. Stop . 

Weights, 56-lb. 

Whistles, Referee's . 

Wrestling Equipment 

Wrist Machines 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO | 

ANY COMMUNICATIONS 
ADDRESSED TO US 



A. G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



FOR COMPLETE LIST OF STORES 

SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER 

OF THIS BOOK 



Prices in effect July 5, 1911. Subject to change without notice. For Canadian prices see special Canadian Catalogue 



Standard Policy 

A Standard Quality must be inseparably linked to a Standard Policy. 

Without a definite and Standard Mercantile Policy, it is impossible for a manufacturer to long 
maintain a Standard Quality. 

To market his goods through the jobber, a manufacturer must provide a profit for the jobber a9 
well as the retail dealer. To meet these conditions of Dual Profits, the manufacturer is obliged to 
set a proportionately high list price on his goods to the consumer. 

To enable the glib salesman, when booking his orders, to figure out attractive profits to both the 
jobber and retailer, these high list prices are absolutely essential; but their real purpose will have been 
served when the manufacturer has secured his order from the jobber, and the jobber has secured hi9 
order from the retailer. 

However, these deceptive high list prices are not fair to the consumer, who does not, and, in 
reality, is not ever expected to pay these fancy list prices. 

When the season opens for the sale of such goods, with their misleading but alluring high list 
prices, the retailer begins to realize his responsibilities, and grapples with the situation as best he 
can, by offering "special discounts," which vary with local trade conditions. 

Under this system of merchandising, the profits to both the manufacturer and the jobber are 
assured; but as there is no stability maintained in the prices to the consumer, the keen competition 
amongst the local dealers invariably leads to a demoralized cutting of prices by which the profits of 
the retailer are practically eliminated. 

This demoralization always reacts on the manufacturer. The jobber insists on lower, and still 
lower, prices. The manufacturer in his turn, meets this demand for the lowering of prices by the 
only way open to him, viz. : the cheapening and degrading of the quality of his product. 

The foregoing conditions became so intolerable that, 12 years ago, in 1899, A. G. Spalding 
& Bros, determined to rectify this demoralization in the Athletic Goods Trade, and inaugurated what 
has since become known as "The Spalding Policy." 

The " Spalding Policy " eliminates the jobber entirely, so far as Spalding Goods are concerned, 
and the retail dealer secures his supply of Spalding Athletic Goods direct from the manufacturer 
under a restricted retail price arrangement by which the retail dealer is assured a fair, legitimate and 
certain profit on all Spalding Athletic Goods, and the consumer is assured a Standard Quality and is 
protected from imposition. 

The "Spalding Policy" is decidedly for the interest and protection of the users of Athletic Goods, 
and acts in two ways: 

First— The user is assured of genuine Official Standard Athletic Goods, and 

the same fixed prices to everybody. 
Second— As manufacturers, we can proceed with confidence in purchasing at 
the proper time, the very best raw materials required in the manufacture 
of our various goods, well ahead of their respective seasons, and this enables 
us to provide the necessary quantity and absolutely maintain the Spalding 
Standard of Quality? 
All retail dealers handling Spalding Athletic Goods are required to supply consumers at our 
regular printed catalogue prices— neither more nor less— the same prices that similar goods are sold 
for in our New York, Chicago and other stores. 

AH Spalding dealers, as well as users of Spalding Athletic Goods, are treated exactly alike, and no 
special rebates or discriminations are allowed to anyone. 

Positively, nobody; not even officers, managers, salesmen or other employes of A. G. Spalding 
& Bros., or any of their relatives or personal friends, can buy Spalding Athletic Goods at a discount 
from the regular catalogue prices. 

This, briefly, is the "Spalding Policy," which has already been in successful operation for the 
past 12 years, and will be indefinitely continued. 

In other words, " The Spalding Policy " is a "square deal " for everybody. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 



PRESIDENT. %m-" 



Standard Quality 

An article that is universally given the appellation "Standard" is thereby 
conceded to be the Criterion, to which are compared all other things of a similar nature. 
For instance, the Gold Dollar of the United States is the Standard unit of currency, 
because it must legally contain a specific proportion of pure gold, and the fact of its 
being Genuine is guaranteed by the Government Stamp thereon. As a protection to 
the users of this currency against counterfeiting and other tricks, considerable money 
is expended in maintaining a Secret Service Bureau of Experts. Under the law, citizen 
manufacturers must depend to a great extent upon Trade-Marks and similar devices 
to protect themselves against counterfeit products — without the aid of " Government 
Detectives "or "Public Opinion " to assist them. 

Consequently the "Consumer's Protection" against misrepresentation and "in- 
ferior quality" rests entirely upon the integrity and responsibility of the "Manufacturer." 

A. G. Spalding & Bros, have, by their rigorous attention to "Quality," for thirty- 
four years, caused their Trade-Mark to become known throughout the world as a 
Guarantee of Quality as dependable in their field as the U. S. Currency is in its field. 

The necessity of upholding the guarantee of the Spalding Trade-Mark and main- 
taining the Standard Quality of their Athletic Goods, is, therefore, as obvious as is the 
necessity of the Government in maintaining a Standard Currency. 

Thus each consumer is not only insuring himself but also protecting other con- 
sumers when he assists a Reliable Manufacturer in upholding his Trade-Mark and all 
that it stands for. Therefore, we urge all users of our Athletic Goods to assist us in 
maintaining the Spalding Standard of Excellence, by insisting that our Trade-Mark be 
plainly stamped on all athletic goods which they buy, because without this precaution 
our best efforts towards maintaining Standard Quality and preventing fraudulent 
substitution will be ineffectual. 

Manufacturers of Standard Articles invariably suffer the reputation of being 
high-priced, and this sentiment is fostered and emphasized by makers of ' ' inferior 
goods," with whom low prices are the main consideration. 

A manufacturer of recognized Standard Goods, with a reputation to uphold and a 
guarantee to protect, must necessarily have higher prices than a manufacturer of cheap 
goods, whose idea of and basis for a claim for Standard Quality depends principally 
upon the eloquence of the salesman. 

We know from experience that there is no quicksand more unstable than poverty 
in quality— and we avoid this quicksand by Standard Quality. 



l^^^^^^^^^/^^x^ 




The Spaldinq 

Oiiicial 



*.* 



.• 



' ', 



•'±%$£i 



&§£$ 







ffiSEF 



Inter- Collegiate 

FOOT BALL 



No. J 5. 



#^ 



Group II. No. 2 



^fw* 



Price 10 cents 



kSjs-> 



-H 



ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



OFFICIAL 

Foot Ball Guide 

Edifed 'J& Walter * l 
Camp 




* Containing the 

» NEW RULES 



FOR 



^-j-"^....^ t...™ pm|m 

ttK American Sports Publishing Co.Ife^ 



^I'^nii'rtwiiHiwuiaiiuHiiHniiiJiihiHiiMiiininiiiinuiiiiiui/iiiiHHiiiiiffriNinuiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinfiiii 




- 1 — - 



A. G. Spalding & Bros. 

MAINTAIN THEIR OWN HOUSES 
FOR DISTRIBUTING THE 

Spalding 

^^ COMPLETE LINE OF .' , 

Athletic Goods 

. IN THE FOLLOWING CITIES 




NEW YORK 

"1241-128 Nassau St. 
tP 29-33 West 42d St. 
NEWARK, N. J. 

845 Broad Street 
BOSTON, MASS. 

141 Federal Street 



BUFFALO, N. Y. 

611 Main Street 
SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

357 So. Warren Street 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

608 Wood Street 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

1210 Chestnut Street 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

110 E. Baltimore St. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 
613 14th Street, N.W. 



LONDON, ENGLAND 



Thro 



Sl„r 



17-318, 
High Holborn, W C. 
78, Cheapside, E. C. 

West End Branch 

29, Haymarket, S.W. 
PARIS, FRANCE 

26 Rue Cadet 



CHICAGO 

28-30 So. Wabash Ave. 
ST. LOUIS, MO. 

415 North Seventh St. 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

1120 Grand Avenue 
DENVER, COL. 

1616 Arapahoe Street 



CINCINNATI, O. 

119 East Fifth Avenue 
CLEVELAND, O. 

741 Euclid Avenue 
COLUMBUS, O. 

191 South High Street 



DETROIT, MICH. 

254 Woodward Ave. 
LOUISVILLE* KY. 

328 West Jefferson St. 
INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

1 36 N. Pennsylvania St. 



MANCHESTER, ENG. 

4, Oxford St. and 
1, Lower Mosley St. 
BIRMINGHAM, ENG. 

57, New Street 
EDINBURGH, SCOT. 

3 South Charlotte St. 



gjjffi y 



MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

379 East Water Street 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

44 Seventh St., South 
ST. PAUL, MINN. 

386 Minnesota Street 



ATLANTA, GA. 

74 N. Broad Street 
NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

140 Carondelet Street 
DALLAS, TEX. 

1503 Commerce Street 



TORONTO, ONT. 

189 Yonge Street 




THE SPALDING 



TRADE - MARK 
QUALITY AND 
SELLING POLICY 



Constitute the Solid Foundation of the Spalding Business 




Binding is in Blue Cloth with 
Cover Design Stamped in Gold 

PRICE $2.00 NET 



Size, 5^x8 inches ; 

600 Pages 

115 Full Page Plates 

Including a Series of 

Cartoons by 

Homer C. Davenport 



America's National Game 
By A. G. SPALDING 

Price, $2.00 Net 

A book of 600 pages, profusely illustrated 
with over 100 full page engravings, and hav- 
ing sixteen forceful cartoons by Homer C. 
Davenport, the famous American artist. 

No man in America is better equipped 
to write on all the varied phases of the Na- 
tional Game than is A. G. Spalding. His 
observation and experience began when the 
game was young. He gained fame as a 
pitcher forty years ago, winning a record as 
player that has never yet been equalled. 
He was associated with the management of 
the pastime through trying years of struggle 
against prevailing evils. He opposed the 
gamblers; he fought to eradicate 
drunkenness ; he urged and intrc- 
duced new and higher ideals for 
the sport ; he was quick to see tha* 
ball playing and the business man- 
agement of clubs, at the same time 
and by the same men, were imprac- 
ticable ; he knew that ball players 
might be quite competent as magnates, but not while playing 
the game ; he was in the forefront of the fight against syndi- 
cating Base Ball and making of a Nation's pastime a sordid 
Trust; he was the pioneer to lead competing American 
Base Ball teams to a foreign land ; he took two champion 
teams to Great Britain in 1 874, and two others on a tour of 
the world in 1 888-9 ; he was present at the birth of the 
National League, and has done as much as any living 
American to uphold and prolong the life of this great pioneer 
Base Ball organization. 

When A. G. Spalding talks about America's National 
Game he speaks by authority of that he does know, because 




lie has been in the councils of the management whenever 
there have been times of strenuous endeavor to purge it 
from abuses and keep it clean for the people of America 
— young and old 

In this work Mr* Spalding, after explaining the causes 
that led him into the undertaking, begins with the inception 
of the sport ; shows how it developed, by natural stages 
from a boy with a ball to eighteen men, ball, bats and bases ; 
gives credit for the first scientific application of system to 
the playing of the game to Abner Doubleday, of Coopers- 
town, N. Y.: treats of the first Base Ball club ; shows how 
rowdyism terrorized the sport in its early days ; how gam- 
bling and drunkenness brought the pastime into disfavor 
with the masses, and how early organizations were unable 
to control the evils that insidiously crept in. He then 
draws a series of very forceful pictures of the struggle to 
eradicate gambling, drunkenness and kindred evils, and shows 
■how the efforts of string men accomplished the salvation of 
the great American game and placed it in the position it occu- 
pies to-day — the most popular outdoor pastime in the world. 

Interspersed throughout this interesting book are remin- 
iscences of Mr. Spalding's own personal observations and 
experiences in the game as player, manager and magnate, 
covering a period of many years. Some of these stories 
deal with events of great import to Base Ball, and others 
liave to do with personal acts and characteristics of players 
prominent in the game in earlier days — old time favorites 
like Harry and George Wright, A. C. Anson, Mike Kelly, 
Billy Sunday and others. 

This book should be in the library of every father in 
the land, for it shows how his boy may be built up physically 
and morally through a high-class pastime. It should be in 
the hands of every lad in America, for it demonstrates the 
possibilities to American youth of rising to heights of eminent 
material success through a determined adherence to things 
that make for the upbuilding of character in organizations as 
^well as of men. 

Mailed postpaid on receipt of price by any Spalding store 
(see list on inside front cover), or by the publishers, 

American Sports Publishing Company 

21 Warren Street, New York 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



Giving the Titles of all Spalding Athletic Library Books now 
^ in print, grouped lor ready reference g 



■D 



ng's Offic 
ng's Offic 
ng's Offic 
ng's Offic 



No SPALDING 

1 Spald 
IA Spald 
IC Spald 

2 Spald 
2A Spald 
4 Spald 

6 Spald 

7 Spald 
7A Spald 

8 Spald 

9 Spald 
I2A Spald 



ANNUALS 



ng 
ng 
ng 
ng 
ng 
ng 



Offic 
Offic 
Offic 
Offic 
Offic 
Offic 



ng's Offic 
ng's Offic 



OFFICIAL 

al Base Ball Guide 

al Base Ball Record 

al College Base Ball Annual 

al Foot Ball Guide 

Soccer Foot Ball Guide 

Lawn Tennis Annual 

Ice Hockey Guide 

Basket Ball Guide 
al Women's Basket Ball Guide 
al Lacrosse Guide 
al Indoor Base Bail Guide 
al Athletic Rules 



al 
al 

al 
al 



Group I. 

No. 1 

No. 1a 
No. lc 
No. 202 
No. 223 
No. 232 
No. 230 
No. 229 
No. 225 
No. 226 
No. 227 
No. 228 
No. 224 



No. 
231 



Base Ball 

Spalding's Official Base Ball 

Guide. 
Official Base Ball Record. 
College Base Ball Annual. 
How to Play Base Ball. 
How to Bat. 
How to Run Bases. 
How to Pitch. 
How to Catch. 
How to Play First Base. 
How to Play Second Base. 
How to Play Third Base. 
How to Play Shortstop. 
How to Play the Outfield. 
f How to Organize a Base Ball 
League. [Club. 

How to Organize a Base Ball 
How to Manage a Base Ball 

Club. 
How to Train a Base Ball Team 
How to Captain a Base Ball 
How to Umpire a Game. [Team 
_ Technical Base Ball Terms. 
No. 219 Ready Reckoner of Base Ball 

Percentages. 
No. 350 How to Score. 

BASE BALL AUXILIARIES 
No. 355 MinorLeague Base Ball Guide 
No. 356 Official Book National League 
of Prof. Base Ball Clubs. 
Official Handbook National 
Playground Ball Assn. 

Foot Ban 

No.2 Spalding's Official Foot Ball Guide 
No. 344 ADigest of the Foot Ball Rules 

How to Play Foot Ball. 

Spalding's Official Soccer Foot 
Ball Guide. 

How to Play Soccer. 

How to Play Rugby. 



No. 340 



Croup II. 



No. 324 
No. 2A 



No. 286 
No. 335 



FOOT BALL AUXILIARY 
No. 351 Official Rugby Foot Ball Guide 

Group IV. Lawn Tennis 

No. 4 Spalding's Official Lawn Ten- 
nis Annual. 

No. 157 How to Play Lawn Tennis. 

No. 354 Official Handbook National 
Squash Tennis Association. 



Group VI. 

No. 



No. 304 
No. 154 
No. 180 



Hockey 

Spalding's Official Ice Hockey 

Guide. 
How to Play Ice Hockey. 
Field Hockey. 
Ring Hockey. 

{Lawn Hockey. 
Parlor Hockey. 
Garden Hockey. 

Group VII. Basket Ball 

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1. Dr. J. A. Babbitt, Haverford: 2, Capt. Joseph W. Beacham, Cornell; 3, Walter 
Camp, Yale: 4, Lieut. V. W. Cooper, West Point; 5, Paul J. Dashiel, Annapolis; 
6. Parke H. Davis, Princeton; 7,W. L. Dudley, Vanderbilt;8, E. K. Hall, Dartmouth, 
Chairman; 9, P. D. Haughton, Harvard: 10. C. W. Savage, Oberlin: 11, A. A. 
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Photos Copyright, 1910, by American Press Association and Paul Thompson. 

MEMBERS OF RULES COMMITTEE, 1912. 



SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 
Group II. No. 2 



=xzx 



Spalding's Official 

Foot Ball Guide 

1912 

FOOT BALL RULES 

As Recommended by the Rules Committee 

Consisting of 

E. K. HALL, Dartmouth, Chairman 

WALTER CAMP, Yale, Secretary 

Dr. JAMES A. BABBITT, Haverford 

Dr. CARL F. WILLIAMS, University of Pennsylvania 

PERCY D. HAUGHTON, Harvard 

PAUL J. DASH1ELL, Annapolis 

W. L. DUDLEY, Vanderbilt 

PARKE H. DAVIS, Princeton 

Lieut. V. W. COOPER, West Point 

C. W. SAVAGE, Oberlin 

S. C. WILLIAMS, University of Iowa 

A. A. STAGG, University of Chicago 

H. L. WILLIAMS, University of Minnesota 

Capt. J. W. BEACHAM, Cornell 

Official Publication 
EDITED BY WALTER CAMP 



r>d 



For publication by the 

AMERICAN SPORTS PUBLISHING COMPANY 

21 Warren Street, New York 



Copyright, 1912 

BY 

American Sports Publishing Company 
New York 



Contents 



PAGE 

All-America Foot Ball Team 5 

Other All- America Selections 19 

Some Representative Teams and Their Work in 1911 39 

Review of the Western Conference Season of 1911 45 

Foot Ball in the Middle States 55 

South Atlantic Foot Ball 59 

All-South Atlantic Foot Ball Team 61 

All-Southern Foot Ball Team of 1911 65 

Foot Ball in New England 69 

Foot Ball in Western Pennsylvania 73 

All-Ohio Conference Eleven for 1911 79 

Foot Ball in Ohio 81 

Alterations in Rules for 1912 89 

Diagram of Field of Play 90 

Official Playing Rules 91 

Officials' List American Intercollegiate Foot Ball Rules Committee, 1912. . . 175 

Scores of Intercollegiate Series, 1873 to 1912 187 

The Field Goal Record 211 

Review of the Scholastic Foot Ball Season in the East in 1911 219 

Middle States Scholastic Foot Ball 223 

All-Star Scholastic Elevens for Greater New York 227 

Western New York Foot Ball 231 

Foot Ball in Central New York 235 

Scholastic Foot Ball in Greater Boston 237 

College Notes 241 

Records of Teams 263 

Schedules for 1912 312 

Captains, Coaches and Managers of College Teams „ 322 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



All-America Foot Ball Team 

THE ANNUAL SELECTION AND A REVIEW OF THE SEASON. 

BY 

WALTER CAMP 

(From Collier's Weekly. Copyright, 1911, by F. F. Collier & Son.) 



First Eleven. 

End White, Princeton. 

Tackle Hart, Princeton. 

Guard Fisher, Harvard. 

Center Ketcham, Yale. 

Guard Duff, Princeton. 

Tackle Devore, West Point. 

End. Bomeisler, Yale. 

Quarter-back Howe, Yale. 

Half-back Wendell, Harvard. 

Half-back Thorpe, Carlisle. 

Full-back Dalton, Annapolis. 



Second Eleven. 
Smith, Harvard. 
Munk, Cornell. 
Scmby, Chicago. 
Bluthenthal, Prin. 
McDevitt, Yale. 
Scully, Yale. 
Very, Penn State. 
Sprackling, Brown. 
Morey, Dartmouth. 
Camp, Yale. 
Rosenwald, Minn. 



Third Eleven. 
Ashbaugh, Brown, 
Buser, Wisconsin. 
Francis, Yale. 
Weems, Annapolis. 
Arnold, West Point, 
Brown, Annapolis. 
Kallett, Syracuse. 
Capron, Minnesota. 
Mercer, U. of Pa. 
Wells, Michigan. 
Hudson, Trinity. 



The foot ball season 
of 1911 will go down in 
history as one of mir- 
acles. In fact, aside from 
the sudden transforma- 
tion of teams from los- 
ing teams to victorious 
teams, and vice versa, 
even the ball finally be- 
gan to take part in the 
extraordinary happen- 
ings, and on one day, 
namely, the day of the 
Princeton - Dartmouth 
and Andover - Exeter 
games, in each of w T hich 
games the ball performed 
what would seem to be 
a miracle, namely, run- 
ning along the ground 
for a considerable dis- 
tance and then bound- 
ing up over the cross- 
bar. In the case of the 
Princeton - Dartmouth 
game this ball was 
started by a partially 
missed drop-kick and 
thus : went over forty 
yards, hitting .the 
ground occasionally be- 
fore it struck on its 




White (Princeton), 
End 



end on some irregular- 
ity and leaped up over 
the goal bar. Then, too, 
the favorites in a very^ 
great proportion of the 
important games were 
returned eventually as 
the losers ; nor was- 
there any consistency 
about these upsets, but 
they came in the most 
unexpected ways and 
upon extraordinary oc- 
casions. Not only were- 
teams inconsistent in 
their work, but also in- 
dividuals. Men who- 
had played steadily 
through the season ud- 
til some impor ta n t 
game- suddenly seemed 
to lose their perspect- 
ive and, hence, their 
effectiveness. This was- 
true in several posi- 
tions. The principal 
contests of the year 
were won and lost 
through a fumble or a 
fluke. None of *» the- 
other work counted. 
Harvard lost her game? 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 





to Princeton while attempting a drop-kick 

under Princeton's goal. Yale lost her game to 

Princeton, when well into Princeton's terri- 
tory, by a slip of the ball going through the 

full-back's hands and being picked up by the 

Princeton end, who ran the entire two-thirds 

of the length of the field for a touchdown. Nor 

could his presence on the spot be regarded as 

providential for Princeton, for it was his habit. 

This young man White was the same one who 

ran two-thirds of the length of the field f o • 

Princeton's touchdown against Harvard after 

a drop-kick. Princeton defeated Dartmouth by 

the kick already mentioned earlier in this arti- 
cle, the ball traveling forty-five yards and 

then bounding over the bar. Harvard defeated 

Dartmouth by a blocked kick. Wisconsin tied 

Minnesota, Capron scoring Minnesota's touch- 
down by running back the initial kick-off, and 

Moll later running half the length of the field 

for a touchdown for Wisconsin. True it is 

that on two important Saturdays the weather 

was atrocious and the fields in wretched con- 
dition. Usually for the important games of 

late years the conditions have been good. 
The forward pass took no more prominent 

position than of old ; in fact, in the late 
games considerably less. It 
resulted in disaster on one or 
two occasions in contests that 
meant a good deal. It was 
not productive of any spec- 
tacular plays. The on-side 

kick has been, as always, a matter of luck ; that is, 
if the ball bounds straight the defensive side secures 
possession of it easily and the side on the attack has 
lost several yards on the kick. That is the differ- 
ence between the long kick and the short one. If, 
on the other hand, the ball performs a freak antic 
and either jumps sidewise or hits on the end and 
bounds clear over the defensive man's head, the play 
results in a fine gain for the kicker's side, possibly 
even in a touchdown at very little expenditure of 
effort. But who can tell which way the ball will 
bound? Surely no scientific study or daily practice 
can forecast the action of this leather sphere. 

There seems to be a wide diversity of opinion on 
the matter of the rules so far as physical injuries 
are concerned, which only a more careful analysis at 
the end of the season can really determine. Without 
statistical information it seems as if injuries to the 
hand, arm. and shoulder had been more prevalent last 
year than before, but injuries to the body or spine 
much less. 

The officials, on the whole, did a good job. There- 
was in mid-season too great laxity in two respects, 
namely, allowing the man attempting to block the 
kick to run into the kicker after he had gotten the 
ball away and allowing pushing and pulling, chiefly 
pushing of the runner after he reached the line. If 
men in the back-field follow the runner into the line- 



Hart (Princeton), 
Tackle 



Fisher f Harvard), 
Guard 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



9 




lie endeavors to go through, nine times out of 

ten they must, even if they keep their hands 

off him, eventually push him, for he is stopped 

when they are still running forward and they 

go against him. 

There was also too much interference in 

the neutral zone od forward passing. It was 

rather strange that the officials seemed to be 

more intent upon this in the case of a kick 

than in the case of a forward pass, for the 

man receiving the pass is very apt to he 

humped, not hard, but simply by a man put- 
ting himself in his way, and it was seldom 

called by the officials. All these matters 

improved somewhat toward the end of the 

.season, but need considerable emphasis yet. 
Punting and drop-kicking were exceptionally 

good, and the kicking from placement, par- 
ticularly in the case of the Indians and in 

some of the Western teams, held its own. 

Considering the first mentioned, punting, it is 

^doubtful if there ever ware in any one season 

-on the gridiron so many good average kickers, 

and these men were forced to kick, many of 

them under most trying conditions of weather 

and field. Drop-kicking, too, was good, but 

risky. In the Princeton-Harvard game, for 

instance, each team had a drop-kick blocked, 

one resulting in a touchdown against them, 
and the other would have 
resulted in a similar dis- 
aster had the man who 
picked up the ball been 

fast enough to keep away from his pursuers. 
There was nothing between him and the goal 
line. The drop-kick made by De Witt, which 
resulted in Princeton's victory over Dartmouth, 
will pass down into foot ball history as the most 
extraordinary since the introduction of the sport. 
It has already been described, and it is safe to 
say that no kick ever gave rise during a few 
hours after it had been made to so widespread a 
discussion. It should be stated that kicks of a 
similar character, although by no means so 
remarkable, have resulted in scores previously, 
and in fact the case had been discussed by the 
Rules Committee, although no such extraordinary 
happening as in this case had ever come before 
them. Probably a satisfactory solution of the 
difficulty will be attained by a rule to the effect 
that the ball, after it once takes its flight, must 
not again hit the ground before it passes over 
the goal bar or over either post. The reason for 
not allowing the touching of the ball by an oppo- 
nent to vitiate the kick is the difficulty of ruling 
upon this. It would be easy enough for an offi- 
cial to -see that the ball was struck by an 
uplifted hand or arm in case the ball were 
deflected, but a man might easily touch the ball 
with his finger tips and he alone be sure that 
Duff (Princeton), Guard he had thus touched it. 




Ketchar-* (Yale), Center 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE 



11 





Tthe season will certainly give rise to a very 
considerable discussion of the present rules, 
and a party that advocates an increased num- 
ber of downs — four instead of three all over 
the field, or at least within the 25-yard line- 
will gain many adherents. 

The rules forbidding tackling below the 
knees and decreeing that the ball is dead 
when any part of a man except his feet 
touches the ground when in the grasp of an 
opponent should be either modified or 
enforced. 

Meantime public interest in the sport seems 
to be still on the increase. The impossibility 
of taking care of those who have a presup- 
posed right to see the big games is pressing 
harder and harder upon the management and 
increased seating capacity is demanded. The 
fact that the players and former players are 
not satisfied with the game as it is has seemed 
to have very little influence upon the desire 
of the general public to witness the big con- 
tests, and it is also true that contests 
regarded as minor in former years are begin- 
ning to draw almost as much attention as the 
big games did eight or ten years ago. The 
game is played more generally in the schools 
and on vacant lots during the fall season, 
and it seems that the 
elimination of pushing and 
pulling and the possibility 
of at least partially suc- 
cessful methods with this elimination have 
enhanced its value to the immature players. 

Princeton, after many years of depression, in 
several of which the early part of her season 
would be particularly prosperous and she would 
start in the lead in her championship game with 
Yale only to lose it, came to her own at last in 
1911, defeating Harvard 8 to 6 and Yale 6 to 3. 
This was the first year of the renewal of rela- 
tions between Princeton and Harvard. Hence, it 
was all the more a satisfaction for Princeton to 
continue the work where she laid it down years 
ago. Dartmouth played remarkably close games 
with both Harvard and Princeton, in each case a 
fluke changing the games from ties into defeats. 
Brown started off well, defeating Pennsylvania, 
but running up against both Harvard and Yale 
when these two were at the top of their game. 
Carlisle did some really excellent work, but 
had her own little downfall, too, at the hands 
of Syracuse. Penn State played sterling foot 
ball. The Army and Navy plugged along with 
consistent standard conservatism, which stood 
them in good stead and was probably as wise a 
method as any. In fact, one of the best ways to 
summarize the season's lessons is to start with 
the Army and Navy as a basis of good foot ball 
without frills, view Carlisle as the type of team* 
Bomeisler (Yale) , End. *hat will take the biggest chances on attack, and 



Devore (Army) . Tackle. 





SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUID2. 

Princeton as the type of team tfcat took no 

•chances on 'attack : in fact practically 

ignored that end of the game' -altogether. 

The Carlisle-Harvard game and the Prince- 
ton-Yale game are good examples of these 

two widely divergent policies. Carlisle took 

every chance and scored 18 points on Har- 
vard (more than twice as many as did 

Princeton), but meantime Harvard scored 

15 points on her. In the Yale-Princeton 

game, Princeton never scored a first down 

or carried the ball into Yale's territory, and 

Princeton defeated Yale 6 to 3. Minnesota 

had one of the best running attacks of the 

the year, and Yale had a similar one, but 

Minnesota's attack was neutralized in the 

Wisconsin game by field conditions, as was 

Yale's. Yale could carry the ball into 

.Princeton's territory, and in the totals on 

ticks gained an average of between two 

and three yards to the kick, yet could not 

get near enough to register upon the score 

board save by a drc^p-kick, and defeated her- 
self by a missed pass when well up in 

Princeton's territory, the ubiquitous Prince- 
ton end, White, picking the ball up after 

the Yale full-back had tried to fall on it, 
and running the length of 
the field for a touchdown 
and victory. 

Certainly there were as 
many strange happenings in Howe (Yale), Quarter-back, 
the foot ball world as among 

the individual players. The teams of the Middle West 
were inconsistent. Minnesota- showed the greatest 
strength as well as the greatest consistency, but 
was tied by Wisconsin in the final game. Michigan 
had many upsets, the most depressing having been 
the defeat by Cornell. Chicago, after being defeated 
by Minnesota no less than 30 to 0, turned about 
and defeated Cornell ; while Syracuse, defeated 
decisively by Y r ale, checked the Carlisle Indians, who 
had defeated Pennsylvania and Harvard. In other 
words, in the two greatest divisions in general foot 
ball, the East and the Middle West, there was such 
a total lack of consistency as to bring very forcibly 
home the question whether quality can be developed 
under the present methods to an extent that may 
give some reasonable assurance of success. Games 
were played in both these sections, as well as the 
South and Southwest, that would indicate there is 
some truth in the statement of a very successful 
coach that if you threw the ball around enough you 
could beat anybody. 

On being asked to define his meaning, he explained 
that the chances were so strongly against a consist- 
ent succession of successful running plays — the rules 
rendering practically all the defense necessary — that 
the thing to do was to utilize as many downs as 
Wendell (Harvard), possible in giving chances both to his own side to 

Half-back. secure the ball after, a forward pass and for the 




SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE). 

other side to make errors. On the last Saturday 
of the season of 1911, when every one was wait- 
ing to place the final stamp of approval or dis- 
approval on rules, teams, and individuals, came 
really the most depressing and unsatisfactory 
results — Brown was tied by Trinity, Michigan 
was tied by Nebraska, Kansas was tied by Mis- 
souri, Yale was tied by Harvard, while the Navy, 
with a weaker running attack, scored a field goal 
on the Army. That ending convinced a large 
majority that four downs are necessary to give 
.a test of superiority. 

Taking up the individual qualifications of those 
who make up the All- America team of 1911, I 
would summarize the players as follows : 

Ends — Probably to no one man in the foot ball 
world came such chances as came to S. White, 
the end of the Princeton team, and certainly no 
one else took the same advantage of them. He 
ran two-thirds the length of the field for a touch- 
down in the Harvard game and performed the 
same feat in the Yale game, besides in the Har- 
vard game covering a kick in such a way as to 
force Harvard to a safety. These were the 
notable achievements that stood out, but the 
work which gives him the right to an All-America 
<end is quite as distinctive in other details. He 
took the field splendidly on kicks, and was very 
deft in picking up the loose ball, two of the most 
valuable qualities in an end. 
Bomeisler of Yale came 
like a whirlwind in the 
last month, making almost 
a second Kilpatrick of (himself, 
set, and fast, he is of the same type as that star, 
while experience and waiting had their effect 
upon him, so that when after a long rest from 
injury he started in in November he became a 
terror to his opponents. 

Tackles — Hart of Princeton found his normal 
position in the line when he went to tackle. His 
work in the back-field in former years had been 
good, but not nearly as valuable to his team as 
/having him in the line of tackle. He is big. 
powerful, aggressive, fast, with a good eye for 
the ball, and with all this is fast in getting down 
the field under kicks. His own individual work 
was responsible foo quite a lot of that splendid 
line defense which Princeton presented to her 
opponents. 

Devore of the Army played a strong and con- 
sistent game throughout the season. He is quick 
for a big man and has much foot ball sense, 
which is very valuable in the tackle's position. 
He is not easily fooled and is strong on inter- 
ference in breaking the line for his own run. 

Guards — Fisher of Harvard kept up the good 
work that made him an All-America guard in 
1010. It is true he was tried at tackle at times, 
but some one at Cambridge realized that they 
might spoil an All-America guard in order to 
Dalton (Navy), Full-back, make a mediocre tackle, and he was therefore 




f horpe (Carlisle), 
Half-back. 

Powerful, thick- 



SPALD,ING'S OFFIdAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 17 

returned to his position at guard. Powerful at interference on the 
attack, well-built and aggressive, he carried out his promise of the 
previous year. 

Duff of Princeton was, together with Hart, one of the mainstays of 
the Orange and Black's excellent defensive line : aggressive but not 
too eager, he generally located the ball with precision, and was a 
very serious obstacle to the attack of the opponents. He was also 
quick in breaking through. 

Centers — Ketcham of Yale was one of the most reliable centers of 
the year, with splendid ability to pass and protect his backs, and, in 
addition to this, by far the most active of the centers in ground- 
covering, both on attack and defense. He was on the [all like a 
hound every minute and recovered blocked kicks and fumbles as 
though he had an uncanny notion of where the ball would be. 

Bluthenthal of Princeton was a close second to Ketcham for the 
pivotal position and a great asset to Princeton in his defensive work. 

Quarters — Howe of Yale, although it was necessary to spare him 
slightly on account of condition, never failed in the chief games. In 
the Brown contest he kicked no less than three field goals, and it 
was his foot which enabled Yale to register the three points against 
Princeton in their game. More than that, on the slippery field he 
showed the best ability of any of the backs of either side to run back 
kicks. He fumbled kicks in the Princeton game, but he could have 
avoided this if he desired, as he was not called upon to catch the 
ball, but made desperate attempts on the low ones, hoping to get 
started for a run back. It was not bad but good foot ball to thus 
try them. 

Bavks — Wendell of Harvard, although not as showy in his work 
as in 1910, and not taking perhaps quite the distances., owing to the 
support of a weaker line, was nevertheless individually the hardest 
plunging half-back last year, thick-set, stocky, while not overfast, he 
was a hard man to stop when once started, and had a peculiar way 
of wriggling out of the tackle's grasp that was most disconcerting. 

Thorpe of the Carlisle Indians was probably one of the most dan- 
gerous men to opponents that played in the back-field last year ; a 
good runner on straight runs and wide runs ; good at circling the 
ends ; a first-class kicker, and a kicker of placement goals, as well as 
powerful on the attack, he can be rated at the highest. Then when 
It came to defense he was equally good, especially being a dangerous 
man when he went up on the line, as Jie did occasionally to hurry 
the opponents' kick. 

Dalton of the Navy is a powerful plunger, reliable in every respect, 
and could spell with Howe on this team as a kicker. 



<*r 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 19 



Other All-America Selections 



Omaba Bee — Ends, White (Princeton) and Bomeisler (Yale); tackles. 
Hart (Princeton) and Devore (West Point); guards, Fisher (Harvard) and 
Duff (Princeton) ; center, Bluthenthal (Princeton) ; quarter-back, Howe 
(Yale); half-backs, Rosenwald (Minnesota) and Wendell Harvard); full- 
back, Dalton (Annapolis). 

Dr. H. L. Williams, University of Minnesota — Ends, White (Princeton) and 
Wells (Michigan); tackles, Hart (Princeton) and Frank (Minnesota); guards, 
Wakeman (Annapolis) and Robinson (Minnesota) ; center, Sibert (West 
Point) ; quarter-back, Howe (Yale) ; half-backs, Rosenwald (Minnesota) and 
Wendell (Harvard); full-back, Philbin (Yale). 

New York World — Ends. White (Princeton) and Bomeisler (Yale); tackles. 
Brown (Annapolis) and Hart (Princeton) ; guards, Fisher (Harvard) and Duff 
(Princeton); center, Ketcham (Yale); quarter-back, Howe (Yale); half- 
backs, Morrison (Vanderbilt) and Dalton (Annapolis); full-back, Wendell 
(Harvard). 

New York Globe — Ends, W T hite (Princeton) and Wells (Michigan); tackles, 
Hart (Princeton) and Devore (West Point); guards, Buser (Wisconsin) and 
Howe (Annapolis); center, Ketcham (Yale); quarter-back, Howe (Yale); 
half-backs, Dalton (Annapolis) and Rosenwald (Minnesota); full-back, Wen- 
dell (Harvard). 

B. F. Steinel, Sporting Editor Evening Wisconsin — Ends, White (Princeton) 
and Wells (Michigan); tackles, Hart (Princeton) and Devore (West Point); 
guards, Fisher (Harvard) and Duff (Princeton); center, Ketcham (Yale); 
quarter-back, Howe (Yale) ; half-backs, Dalton (Annapolis) and Wendell 
(Harvard); full-back, Mercer (Pennsylvania) 

Syracuse Post-Standard — Ends, White (Princeton) and Kallett (Syracuse) J 
tackles, Hart (Princeton) and Scully (Yale); guards, Arnold (West Point) 
and Fisher (Harvard) ; center, Ketcham (Yale) ; quarter-back, Moll (Wis- 
consin) ; half-backs, Thorpe (Carlisle) and Dalton (Annapolis); full-back, 
Wendell (Harvard). 

Christian Science Monitor, Boston, Mass. — Ends, White (Princeton) and 
Smith (Harvard); tackles, Hart (Princeton) and Rademacher (Chicago); 
guards, Duff (Princeton) and Fisher (Harvard); center, Arnold (West Point); 
quarter-back, Moll (Wisconsin) ; half-backs, Thorpe (Carlisle) and Wendell 
(Harvard); full-back, Mercer (Pennsylvania). 

ALL-EASTERN SELECTIONS 

Baltimore News — Ends, White (Princeton) and Bomeisler (Yale) ; tackles, 
Hart (Princeton) and Devore (West Point) ; guards, Arnold (West Point) 
and Duff (Princeton) ; center, Bluthenthal (Princeton) ; quarter-back, Howe 
(Yale); half-backs, Dalton (Annapolis) and Wendell (Harvard); full-back, 
Mercer (Pennsylvania). 

Boston Herald — Ends, Smith (Harvard) and White (Princeton) ; tackles. 
Hart (Princeton) and Devore (West Point) ; guards, Pisher (Harvard) and 
Duff (Princeton) ; center, Huntington (Harvard) ; quarter-back, Howe (Yale) ; 
half-backs, Thorpe (Carlisle) and Wendell (Harvard) ; full-back, Mercer 
(Pennsylvania). 

Brooklyn Eagle — Ends, White (Princeton) and Bomeisler (Yale) ; tackles, 
Hart (Princeton) and Scully (Yale); guards, Arnold (West Point) and Fisher 
(Harvard); center, Bluthenthal (Princeton); quarter-back, Sprackling 
(Brown); half-backs, Dalton (Annapolis) and Wendell (Harvard); full-back, 
Mercer (Pennsylvania). 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 21 

New York Press — Ends. White (Princeton) and Boineisler (Yale); tackles, 
Brown (Annapolis) and Hart (Princeton); guards. Arnold (West Point) and 
Duff (Princeton); center, Ketcham (Yale) ; quarter-back. Miller (Penn State); 
balf-backs, Dalton (Navy) and TliQrpe (Carlisle) ; full-back, Mercer (Penn.), 

W. A. Rafter, Sporting Editor Brooklyn Standard Union — Ends, White 
(Princeton) and Boineisler (Yale) ; tackles. Hart (Princeton) and Devore 
(West Point); guards, Fisher (Harvard) and Duff (Princeton); center. 

Ketcharn (Yale); quarter-back, Howe (Yale); half-backs, Wendell (Harvard) 

and Thorpe (Carlisle); full-back, Dalton (Annapolis). 

New York Evening World — Ends. White (Princeton) and Bomeisler (Yale) ; 
tackles, Devore (West Point) and Hart (Princeton); guards, Fisher (Har- 
vard) and Duff (Princeton); center, Ketcham (Yale); quarter-back, Howe- 
(Yale); half-backs, W T endell (Harvard) and Dalton (Annapolis); full-back, 
Mercer (Pennsylvania). 

Boston Globe — Ends, Smith (Harvard) and White (Princeton); tackles. 
Hart (Princeton) and Devore (West Point); guards, Fisher (Harvard) and! 
Duff (Princeton); center, Ketcham (Yale); quarter-back, Howe (Yale) ; half- 
backs, Wendell (Harvard) and Mercer (Penn.); full-back, Dalton (Navy)- 

Pittsburgh Sun — Ends, White (Princeton) and Ashbaugh (Brown) ; tackles. 
Hart (Princeton) and Scully (Yale); guards. Fisher (Harvard) and Duff 
(Princeton); center, Bluthenthal (Princeton); quarter-back, Sprackling 
(Brown) ; half-backs, Wendell (Harvard) and Thorpe (Carlisle) ; full-back. 
Mercer (Pennsylvania). 

Philadelphia Inquirer — Ends, White . (Princeton) and Bomeisler (Yale) r 
tackles. Hart (Princeton) and Devore (West Point) ; guards, Arnold (West 
Point) and Fisher (Harvard); center Bluthenthal (Princeton); quarter-back, 
Howe (Yale); half-backs, Dalton (Annapolis) and Wendell (Harvard); full- 
back, Mercer (Pennsylvania). 

Pittsburgh Press — Ends, White (Princeton) and Wells (Michigan); tackles. 
Scully (Yale) and Brown (Annapolis) ; guards, Duff (Princeton) and Fisher 
(Harvard); center, Bluthenthal (Princeton); quarter-back, Sprackling: 
(Brown); half-backs, Wendell (Harvard) and Dalton (Annapolis); full-back', 
Mercer (Pennsylvania). 

Lieutenant Douglas Howard, Head Coach at Annapolis — Ends, Smith (Har- 
vard) and White (Princeton); tackles, Hart (Princeton) and Scully (Yale); 
guards, Duff (Princeton) and Fisher (Harvard) ; center, Arnold (West Point) ; 
quarter-back, Miller (Penn State) ; half-backs, Dalton (Annapolis) and Wen- 
dell (Harvard); full-back, Thorpe (Carlisle). 

Boston Journal — Ends, White (Princeton) and Ashbaugh (Brown) ; tackles, 
Hart (Princeton) and Scully, (Yale); guards, McDevitt (Yale) and Fisher 
(Harvard) ; center, Bluthenthal (Princeton) ; quarter-back, Sprackling 
(Brown) ; half-backs, Mauthe (Penn State) and Wendell (Harvard) ; full- 
back, Mercer (Pennsylvania). 

New York Evening Telegram — Ends, White (Princeton) and Bomeisler 
(Yale); tackles. Hart (Princeton) and Devore (West Point); guards, Duff 
(Princeton) and Fisher (Harvard); center, Ketcham (Yale); quarter-back, 
Howe (Yale); half-backs. Wendell (Harvard) and Dalton (Annapolis); full- 
back, Mercer (Pennsylvania). 

New York Evening Post — Attack: Ends, Smith (H.), Bomeisler (Y.); 
tackles, Hart (Pr.), Devore (Army); guards, Fisher (H.), Arnold (Army); 
center, Bluthenthal (Pr. ); quarter-back, Howe (Y.); half-backs, Wendell (H.), 
Thorpe (Car.); full-back, Hudson (Trim). Defense: Ends, White (Pr.). 
Bomeisler (Y.); tackles. Hart (Pr.), Devore (Army); guards, Duff (Pr.). 
Arnold (Army); center, Ketcham (Y.); quarter-back, Sprackling (B.); half- 
backs, Dalton (Navy), Baker (Pr.); full-back, Hudson (Trim). 

Philadelphia Press— Ends. White (FrincTTp'n) and Very (Penn State) ; 
tackles, Hart (Princeton) and Brown (Annapolis) ; guards, Duff (Princeton) 
and Arnold (West Point); center. Bluthenthal (Princeton); quarter-back, 
Sprackling (Brown); half-backs, Thorpe (Carlisle) and Dalton (Annapolis); 
full-back, Mercer (Pennsylvania). 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 2* 

Philadelphia Public Ledger — Ends, Bomeisler (Yale) and White (Princeton); 
tackles. Hart (Princeton) and Thompson (Ursinus) ; guards, Fisher (Harvard) 
and Duff (Princeton); center, Bluthenthal (Princeton); quarter-back, Butler 
(Cornell); half-backs, Mercer (Pennsylvania) and Thorpe (Carlisle); full-back. 
Wendell (Harvard). 

Charles Chadwick in New York American — Ends, White (Princeton) and 
Bomeisler (Yale); tackles. Hart (Princeton) and Scully (Yale); guards, Duff 
(Princeton) and Fisher (Harvard) ; center, Ketcham (Yale) ; quarter-back. 
Howe (Yale); half-backs, Wendell (Harvard) and Thorpe (Carlisle); full- 
back, Dalton (Annapolis). 

Newark Sunday Call — Ends, White (Princeton) and Bomeisler (Y r ale) : 
tackles, Hart (Princeton) and Scully (Yale) ; guards. Duff (Princeton) and 
Fisher (Harvard); center, Bluthenthal (Princeton); quarter-back, Howe- 
(Yale); half-backs. Dalton (Annapolis) and Wendell (Harvard); full-back, 
Mercer (Pennsylrania). 

Newark Evening News — Ends, White (Princeton) and Bomeisler (Yale) : 
tackles, Hart (Princeton) and Scully (Yale); guards, Fisher (Harvard) and 
Duff (Princeton); center, Bluthenthal (Princeton); quarter-back, Howe 
(Yale) ; half-backs, Wendell (Harvard) and Dalton (Annapolis) ; full-back, 
Mercer (Pennsylvania). , 

Philadelphia Evening Bulletin — Ends, White (Princeton) and Bomeisler 
(Yale); tackles, Hart (Princeton) and Devore (West Point); guards, Duff 
(Princeton) and Arnold (West Point); center, Galvin (Pittsburgh); quarter- 
back, Howe (Yale); half-backs. Mercer (Pennsylvania) and Thorpe (Car- 
lisle) ; full-back, Wendell (Harvard). 

Brooklyn Times — Ends, White (Princeton) and Ashbaugh (Brown); tackles. 
Hart (Princeton) and Brown (Annapolis); guards, Fisher (Harvard) and Duff 
(Princeton); center, Bluthenthal (Princeton); quarter-back, Miller (Penn 
State) ; half-backs, Wendell (Harvard) and Thorpe (Carlisle) ; full-back, 
Mercer (Pennsylvania). 

Pittsburgh Dispatch — Ends, White (Princeton) and Wagner (Pittsburgh) : 
tackles, Hart (Princeton) and Littlejohn (West Point); guards, Scully 
(Yale) and Duff (Princeton); center, Bluthenthal (Princeton); quarter-back, 
Miller (Penn State) : half-backs, Thorpe (Carlisle) and Dalton (Annapolis) ; 
full-back, Wendell (Harvard). 

Pittsburgh Press — Ends, White (Princeton) and Wells (Michigan) ; tackles, 
Scully (Yale) and Brown (Annapolis); guards, Duff (Princeton) and Fisher 
(Harvard); center, Bluthenthal (Princeton); quarter-back, Sprackling 
(Brown) ; half-backs, Wendell (Harvard) and Dalton (Annapolis) ; full-back, 
Mercer (Pennsylvania). 

W. B.Hannain New York Sun — Ends, Bomeisler (Yale) and White (Princeton); 
tackles, Hart (Princeton) and Devore (West Point) ; guards, Fisher (Harvard) and 
Arnold (West Point); center, Bluthenthal (Princeton); quarter-back, Howe 
(Yale); half-backs, Dalton (Annapolis) and Hudson (Trinity); full-back, 
Mercer (Pennsylvania). 

New York Herald — Ends, White (Princeton) and Smith (Harvard) ; tackles. 
Hart (Princeton) and Scully (Yale) ; guards, Howe (Annapolis) and Arnold 
(West Point); center, Bluthenthal (Princeton); quarter-back. Sprackling 
(Brown); half-backs, Dalton (Annapolis) and Thorpe (Carlisle); full-back. 
Wendell (Harvard). 

New York Tribune — Ends, White (Princeton) and Bomeisler (Yale) ; tackles, 
tackles, Hart (Princeton) and Elcock (Dartmouth); guards, Duff (Princeton) 
and Fisher (Harvard); center, Bluthenthal (Princeton); quarter-back, Howe 
(Yale); half-backs, Dalton (Annapolis) and Wendell (Harvard); full-back. 
Mercer (Pennsylvania). 

New York Mail — Ends, Smith (Harvard) and White (Princeton); tackles, 
Hart (Princeton) and Brown (Annapolis); guards. Arnold (West Point) and 
Fisher (Harvard); center, Bluthenthal (Princeton); quarter-back. Miller 
(Penn State); half-backs. Dalton (Annapolis) and Thorpe (Carlisle) ; full- 
back. Mercer (Pennsylvania). 



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SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 25 

Cross Buck in Washington Times — Ends, Smith (Harvard) and Bomeisler 
<Yale); tackles, Hart (Princeton) and Englehorn (Dartmouth); guards. Arnold 
(West Point) and Fisher (Harvard) ; center, Weems (Annapolis) ; quarter- 
back. Howe (Yale) ; half-backs, Wendell (Harvard) and Baker (Princeton) ; 
lull-baek, Dalton (Annapolis). 

Louis A. Drougher in Washington Times — Ends. Bomeisler (Yale) and 
Smith (Harvard); tackles, Hart (Princeton) and Brown (Annapolis); guards, 
Fisher (Harvard) and Duff (Princeton); center, Bluthenthal (Princeton); 
quarter-back, Hewe (Yale); half-backs. Mercer (Pennsylvania) and Wendell 
(Harvard); full-back, Dalton (Annapolis). 

ALL-WESTERN SELECTIONS 

B. F. Steinel, Sporting Editor Evening Wisconsin — Ends, Wells (Michigan) 
and Brennan (Marquette) ; tackles, Buser (Wisconsin) and Conklin (Mich- 
igan) ; guards, Neprud (Wisconsin) and Scruby (Chicago); center, O'Brien 
(Iowa); quarter-back, Moll (Wisconsin); half-backs. Sauer (Chicago) and 
Rosenwald (Minnesota); full-back, Thompson (Michigan). 

Chicago EVening Post — Ends, Wells (Michigan) and Capron (Minnesota); 
tackles, Rademacher (Chicago) and Buser (Wisconsin); guards, Scruby (Chi- 
cago) and Shonka (Nebraska); center, O'Brien (Iowa); quarter-back, Moll 
(Wisconsin); half-backs, Sauer (Chicago) and Craig (Michigan); full-back, 
Rosenwald (Minnesota). 

Walter H. Eckersall in Chicago Tribune — Ends, Hoeffel (Wisconsin) and 
Wells (Michigan); tackles, Conklin (Michigan) and Rademacher (Chicago); 
guards, Shonka (Nebraska) and Scruby (Chicago); center, Morrell (Minne- 
sota); quarter-back, Moll (Wisconsin); half-backs. Rosenwald (Minnesota) 
and Sauer (Chicago); full-back, Thompson (Michigan). 

San Francisco Examiner — Ends, Hoeffel (Wisconsin) and Wells (Michigan); 
tackles. Buser (Wisconsin) and Rademacher (Chicago); guards, Shonka 
(Nebraska) and Scruby (Chicago); center, O'Brien (Iowa); quarter-back, Gill 
(Indiana); half-backs, Rosenwald (Minnesota) and Sauer (Chicago); full- 
back, Thompson (Michigan). 

L. G. Sullivan, Sporting Editor Chicago Daily News — Ends, Hoeffel (Wis- 
consin) and Wells (Michigan) ; tackles, Rademacher (Chicago) and Conklin 
(Michigan) ; guards, L. Smith (Minnesota) and Scruby (Chicago) ; center, 
O'Brien (Iowa); quarter-back, Moll (Wisconsin); half-backs, Sauer (Chicago) 
and Rosenwald (Minnesota); full-back, Capron (Minnesota). 

Edward W. Cochrane, Sporting Editor Kansas City (Mo.) Journal — Ends. 
Hoeffel (Wisconsin) and Wells (Michigan); tackles, Conklin (Michigan) and 
Shonka (Nebraska) ; guards, Scruby (Chicago) and Buser (Wisconsin) ; cen- 
ter, Morrell (Minnesota); quarter-back, Moll (Wisconsin); half-backs, Frank 
(Nebraska) and Craig (Michigan); full-back, Thompson (Michigan). 

By G. W. Axeison, Sporting Editor Chicago Record-Herald — Ends, Tobin 
(Minnesota) and Wells (Michigan); tackles, Buser (Wisconsin) and Conklin 
(Michigan) ; guards, Scruby (Chicago) and Belting (Illinois) ; center, O'Brien 
(Iowa); quarter-back, Moll (Wisconsin); half-backs, Craig (Michigan) and 
Rosenwald (Minnesota); full-back, Sauer (Chicago). 

By Edgar L. Shave and John L. Johnson in St. Paul Daily News — fends. 
Wells (Michigan) and Rodnev (Notre Dame) ; tackles, Shonka (Nebraska) 
and Frank (Minnesota) ; guards, L. Smith (Minnesota) and Robinson (Minne- 
sota) ; center. O'Brien (Iowa); quarter-back, Moll (Wisconsin); half-backs, 
"Rosenwald (Minnesota) and Stevens (Minnesota) ; full-back, Capron (Min- 
nesota) . 

ALL-CONFERENCE SELECTIONS 

Chicago Evening Post — Ends, Tobin (Minnesota) and Capron (Minnesota); 
tackles, Rademacher (Chicaero) and Buser (Wisconsin); guards, Scruby (Chi- 
cago) and Belting (Illinois): center. O'Brien (Iowa); quarter-back, Moll 
(Wisconsin) ; half-backs, Gillette (Wisconsin) and Sauer (Chicago) ; full-back, 
Bosenwald (Minnesota). 






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SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 27 

San Francisco Examiner — Ends. Hoeffel (Wisconsin) and Oliver (Illinois); 
tackles, Buser (Wisconsin) and Rademacher (Chicago) ; guards. Smith (Min- 
nesota) and Scruby (Chicago); center, O'Brien (Iowa); quarter-back, Gill 
(Indiana); half-backs, Rosenwald (Minnesota) and Sauer (Chicago); full- 
back, Capron (Minnesota). 

By G. W. Axelson. Sporting Editor Chicago Record-Herald — Ends, Tobin 
(Minnesota) and Hoeffel (Wisconsin) ; tackles, Buser (Wisconsin) and Rade- 
macher (Chicago); guards, Scruby (Chicago) and Belting (Illinois); center, 
O'Brien (Iowa); quarter-back, Moll (Wisconsin); half-backs, Sauer (Chicago) 
and Rosenwald (Minnesota); full-back, Capron (Minnesota). 

By Edgar L. Shave and John L. Johnson in St. Paul Daily News — Ends. 
Ofstie (Wisconsin) ana Scruby (Chicago); tackles, Buser (Wisconsin) and 
Frank (Minnesota); guards. Smith (Minnesota) and Robinson (Minnesota); 
center, O'Brien (Iowa); quarter-back, Moll (Wisconsin); half-backs, Rosen- 
wald (Minnesota) and Stevens (Minnesota); full-back, Capron (Minnesota). 



MISCELLANEOUS SELECTIONS 

All-Western Pennsylvania Collegiate Eleven (Pittsburgh Chronicle) — Ends. 
Wagner (Pittsburgh) and Very (Penn State); tackles, Feightner (Pittsburgh) 
and Engle (Penn State) ; guards, Leahy (Pittsburgh) and Bebout (Penn 
State); center, Galvin (Pittsburgh); quarter-back, Miller (Penn State); half- 
backs, Brown (Pittsburgh) and Tibbens (W. and J.); full-back, Mauthe (Penn 
State). 

All-Western Pennsylvania Scholastic Eleven (Pittsburgh Leader) — Ends, 
Bailey (Shadyside) and Balph (Wilkinsburg High) ; tackles. Wesbecher 
(Greensburg High) and McCandless (Shadyside) ; guards, Shapira (East Lib- 
erty Academy) and Soppitt (Greensburg High); center, Frauenheim (Shady- 
side); quarter-back, Glick (Pittsburgh High); half-backs, McClung (Wilkins- 
burg High) and Jones (Greensburg High); full-back, Gass (Pittsburgh High). 

All-Western Pennsylvania Collegiate Eleven (Pittsburgh Leader) — Ends, 
Wagner (Pittsburgh) and Very (Penn State); tackles, Tibbens (W. and J.) 
and Harlowe (Penn State) ; guards, Blair (Pittsburgh) and Bebout (Penn 
State) ; center, Galvin (Pittsburgh) ; quarter-back, Miller (Penn State) ; half- 
backs, Dewar (Pittsburgh) and Brown (Pittsburgh); full-back, Mauthe (Penn 
State). 

All-Western Pennsylvania Scholastic Eleven (Pittsburgh Dispatch) — Ends. 
Bailey (Shadyside) and Moser (Greensburg High) ; tackles, Wesbecher 
(Greensburg High) and McCandless (Shadyside) ; guards, Shapira (East Lib- 
erty Academy) and Soppitt (Greensburg High) ; center. Fraunenheim (Shady- 
side) ; quarter-back, Glick (Pittsburgh High); half-backs, McClung (Wilkins- 
burg High) and Wolk (Shadyside); full-back, Gass (Pittsburgh High). 

All-Western Pennsylvania Scholastic Eleven (Pittsburgh Gazette-Times) — 
Ends, Moser (Greensburg High) and Jones (Greensburg High); tackles. Wes- 
becher (Greensburg High) and Gass (Pittsburgh High); guards, Shapira (East 
Liberty Academy) and Hockensmith (Kiski) ; center, Croushore (Pittsburgh 
High) ; quarter-back, Morris (Kiski) ; half-backs, Scheren (Kiski) and Glick 
(Pittsburgh High); full back, McCreight (Kiski). 

All-Western Pennsylvania Collegiate Eleven (Pittsburgh Press) — Ends, Very 
(Penn State) and W 7 agner (Pittsburgh); tackles. Blair (Pittsburgh) and Tib- 
bens (W. and J.); guards, Stevenson (Pittsburgh) and Engle (Penn State); 
center, Galvin (Pittsburgh); quarter-back, Miller (Penn State); half-backs, 
Dewar (Pittsburgh) and Brown (Pittsburgh) ; full-back, Mauthe (Penn State). 

All-Florida Eleven (by Y. A. "Pee Wee" Forsythe of Clemson College, In 
Florida Times-Union) — Ends, Buiz (U. of Florida) and McCord (Columbia 
College) ; tackles Bullock (U. of Florida) and Kenningham (Columbia Col- 
lege) ; guards, Baker (U. of Florida) and Coardey (U. of Florida); center and 
captain, Stover (U. of Florida) ; quarter-back, Morgan (Columbia College) ; 
half-backs, Taylor (U. of Florida) and Reddin (Columbia College) ; full-back, 
Tenney (U. of Florida). 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 29 

Buffalo All-High School Eleven (by G. W. Calhoun) — First team— Ends. 
Likens (Lafayette) and Barnes (Technical) ; tackles, Freeman (Masten Park) 
and Smithson (Lafayette); guards, Robertson (Technical) and Forrestor (Mas- 
ten Park); center, Betts (Nichols); quarter-back, Holbrook (Central); half- 
hacks, Purtlll (Masten Park) and Edmunds (Lafayette) ; full-back, Bleieh 
(Central); utility, Hoefner (Central). Second Team — Ends, Hillery (Central) 
and T. Sullivan (Masten Park) ; tackles, Case (Lafayette) and Filbrick 
(Nichols); guards, Ryan (Central) and Ryther (Technical); center, Neu (Mas- 
ten Park) ; quarter-back, Putnam (Nichols) ; half-backs, Walsh (Technical) 
and Muckler (Central) ; full-back, Adams (Lafayette) ; utility, Kelley 
(Lafayette). 

All-Western Pennsylvania Collegiate Eleven (Pittsburgh Dispatch) — Ends, 
Wagner (Pittsburgh) and Very (Penn State); tacSles, Tibbens (W. and J.) 
and Harlowe (Penn State) ; guards, Blair (Pittsburgh) and Bebout (Penn 
State); center, Galvin (Pittsburgh); quarter-back, Miller (Penn State); half- 
backs, Dewar (Pittsburgh) and Brown (Pittsburgh) ; full-back, Mauthe (Penn 
State). 

All-Pacific Northwestern Conference Eleven (by Roscoe Fawcett) — First 
team — Ends, Enberg (Oregon Agricultural) and Sutton (Washington); tackles, 
Bliss (Washington) and Patton (Washington) ; guards, Laird (Washington 
State) and Bailey (Oregon) ; center, Kellogg (Oregon) ; quarter-back, Coyle 
(Washington); half-backs, Main (Oregon) and Mucklestone (Washington); 
full-back, Niles (Whitman). Second team — Ends, Grimm (Washington) and 
Bradshaw (Oregon) ; tackles, Fishback (Washington State) and Neill (Whit- 
man) ; guards, Christman (Oregon Agricultural) and J. Harter (Washington 
State); center, Carlson (Oregon Agricultural); quarter-back, Latourette (Ore- 
gon); half-backs, Wand (Washington) and Perkins (Idaho); full-back, Sparger 
(Washington). 

All-South Atlantic Eleven. (Stanley T. Milliken in Washington Post) — 
Ends, Bergin (Georgetown) and Hegarty (Georgetown) ; tackles, Hart (George- 
town) and Wymard (Georgetown) •, guards, Carter (Virginia) and Bryant 
(Georgetown); center, Woods (Virginia); quarter-back, Todd (Virginia); 
half-backs, Costello (Georgetown) and Fury (Georgetown) ; full-back, Robert- 
son (N. C. A. and M.). 

All-Sbuth Atlantic Eleven (by H. C. Byrd in Washington Star)— Ends, 
Hegarty (Georgetown) and Seifert (N. C. A. and M.); tackles, Wymard 
(Georgetown) and Hart (Georgetown); guards, Floyd (N. C. A. and M.) and 
Carter (Virginia); center, Gibbs (V. P. I.); quarter-back, Sitterding (George- 
town); half-backs, Fury (Georgetown) and Costello (Georgetown); full-back, 
Robertson (N. C. A. and M.). 

All-South Atlantic Eleven (by Thomas Kirby in Washington Times) — Ends, 
Hegarty (Georgetown) and Bergin (Georgetown) ; tackles, Hart (Georgetown) 
And Wymard (Georgetown); guards, Carter (Virginia) and Floyd (N. C. 
A. and M.); center, Cunniff (Georgetown); quarter-back, Costello (George- 
town) ; half-backs, Fury (Georgetown) and Todd (Virginia) ; full-back, White 
(Georgetown). 

Greater New York All-Scholastic Eleven (New York Press) — -Ends, Du Tem- 
ple (Commercial) and Kear (Commerce) ; tackles. White (DeWitt Clinton) and 
Davis (DeWitt Clinton) ; guards Dingwall (Manual) and McKay (DeWitt 
Clinton); center, Cook (Manual); quarter-back, Tow (Commerce); halfl-backs, 
Stieglitz (Boys' High) and Blodgett (Commerce); full-back, Driggs (Adelphi). 

Greater New York All-Scholastic Eleven (New York Herald)— Ends, Wig- 
dor (Morris) and Kear (Commerce) ; tackles, White (Clinton) and Byrne 
(Erasmus); guards, Dingwall (Manual) and McKay (Clinton); center, Cook 
(Manual) ; quarterback, Hughes (Commercial) ; half-backs, Stieglitz (Boys' 
High) and Onley (Commercial); full back, Blodgett (Commerce). 

Greater New York All-Scholastic Eleven (New York World) — Ends, Telfer 
(DeWitt Clinton) and Kear (Commerce); tackles, Kleinert (Poly Prep) and 
Byrne (Erasmus) ; guards, Dingwall (Manual) and White (DeWitt Clinton) ; 
center, Cook (Manual) ; quarter-back, Hughes (Commercial) ; half-backs, 
Stieglitz (Boys' High) and Blodgett (Commerce) full-back, Driggs (Adelphi). 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 31 

Greater New York All-Scholastic Eleven (Brooklyn Eagle) — Ends, Gleason 
(Poly Prep) and Dietrich (Adelphi) ; tackles, Kleinert (Poly Prep) and Byrne 
(Erasmus); guards, Dingwall (Manual) and Conroy (Boys' High); center, 
Cook (Manual); quarter-back, Du Trembly (Poly Prep); half-backs, Onley 
(Commercial) and Stieglitz (Boys' High); full-back, Driggs (Adelphi). 

Greater New York All-Scholastic Eleven (Evening Telegram) — Ends, Wig- 
dor (Morris) and Kear (Commerce); tackles, Byrne (Erasmus) and White 
(DeWitt Clinton); guards, Dingwall (Manual) and McKay (DeWitt Clinton); 
center. Greenburg (DeWitt Clinton); quarter-back. Tow (Commerce); half- 
backs. Stieglitz (Boys' High) and Blodgett (Commerce) ; full-back, Driggs 
(Adelphi). 

Greater New York All-Scholastic Eleven (New York Evening World) — Ends, 
Telfer (DeWitt Clinton) and Kear (Commerce) ; tackles Byrne (Erasmus) and 
Esselstyn (Manual); guards, Dingwall (Manual) and White (DeWitt Clin- 
ton) ; center, Cook (Manual) ; quarter-back. Tow (Commerce) ; half-backs, 
Stieglitz (Boys' High) and Blodgett (Commerce) ; full-back, Blenio (Com- 
merce). 

Greater New York All-Scholastic Eleven (New York Tribune) — Ends, Tel- 
ler (DeWitt Clinton) and Kear (Commerce); tackles. Byrne (Erasmus Hall) 
and Esselstyn (Manual); guards. Dingwall (Manual) and White (DeWitt 
Clinton); center, Cook (Manual); quarter-back. Tow (Commerce); half-backs. 
Stieglitz (Boys' High) and Blodgett (Commerce) ; full-back, Blenio (Com- 
merce). 

Manhattan All-Scholastic Eleven (by Nat Fleischer)— Ends. Wigdor (Mo-i- 
ris) and Kear (Commerce); tackles. White (DeWitt Clinton) and Davis 
(DeWitt Clinton); guards. Kelleher (Commerce) and McKay (DeWitt Clin- 
ton); center, Greenberg (DeWitt Clinton); quarter-back. Tow (Commerce); 
half-backs, Moore (DeWitt Clinton) and Blodgett (Commerce) ; full-back, 
Blenio (Commerce). 

Brooklyn All-Scholastic Eleven — Ends, D*u Temple (Commercial) and Black- 
man (Adelphi); tackles, Byrne (Erasmus) and Kleinert (Poly Prep): guards, 
Dingwall (Manual) and Conroy (Boys' High); center, Cook (Manual); 
quarter-back. Hughes (Commercial); half-backs. Onley (Commercial) and 
Stieglitz (Boys' High); full-back, Driggs (Adelphi). 

District of Columbia All-High School Eleven (by Thomas Kirby in Washing- 
ton Times) — Ends, Dyson (Central) and Eckendorf (Technical); tackles, King 
(Central) and Oberlin (Central); guards, Jones (Central) aDd Chamberlain 
(Central); center, Stokes (Central); quarter-back, Morris (Technical); half- 
backs, Van Dyne (Central) and Reuter (Central); full-back. Hamilton 
(Central). 

All-Detroit High School Eleven (Detroit News) — Ends. Paterson (Central) 
and Bovill (Central) ; tackles. Kennedy (Eastern) and Rumler (Eastern) ; 
guards, Drew (Eastern) and Peacock (Central); center. Warner (Central); 
quarter-back, Clark (Central); half-backs. Powers (D.U.S. ) and Forbush 
(Central); full-back, Ball (Eastern). , 

All-Detroit High School Eleven (Detroit Journal) — Ends, Paterson (Central) 
and Bovill (Central) ; tackles, Smith (Central) and Duffie (Central) ; guards, 
Schlegelmilch (Central) and Peacock (Central); center, Warner (Central; 
quarter-back, Clark (Central): half-backs. Powers (D.U.S.) and Fenton (Cen- 
tral); full-back, Forbush (Central). 

All-Detroit High School Eleven (Detroit Times) — Ends, Paterson (Central) 
and Bovill (Central); tackles, Moesta (Eastern) and Duffie (Central); guards. 
Schlegelmilch (Central) and Cody (D.U.S.); center. Warner (Central); 
quarter-back, Clark (Central); half-backs. Powers (D.U.S.) and Gregg 
(D.U.S.); full-back, Milroy (Central). 

All-California Eleven (by Albert G. Waddell) — Ends, Bonnell (Redlands) 
and Crawford (Pomona) ; tackles. Landreth (Occidental) and Kepner 
(Pomona) ; guards, Henderson (Whittier) and Ash (Pomona) ; center, Gil- 
lette (Pomona); quarter-back. Seay (Occidental); half-backs, Brooks (Pomona) 
and Shutt (Pomona); full-back, Lutz (Pomona). 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 33 

All-Southwestern Eleven (by Capt. H. E. Van Surdam)— Ends, Rolettl 
(Arizona* and Boat (Aggies) ; tackles, Johnson (El Paso Military Institute) 
and Hamilton (U. of New Mexico); guards, L. Baldwin (E.P.M.I.) and 
Classon (Roswell) ; center, Quesenberry (Aggies); quarter-back, Chenowetb 
(E.P.M.I.); half-backs, McElroy (Arizona) and Bausman (Aggies); full-back. 
Lohman (Aggies). 

All-Iowa Eleven (by R. F. Seymour, Iowa State Teachers College) — Ends. 
Chappell (Ames) and Lattimer (Ames) ; tackles, Rutledge (Ames) and Frye 
(Teachers College); guards, Trickey (Iowa) and Hanson (Iowa); center, 
O'Brien (Iowa) ; quarter-back, West (Cornell) ; half-backs, Simons (Drake) 
and Kramm (Cornell); full-back, Murphy (Iowa). 

All-Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Association Eleven (by Glenn Clark, 
William and Vashti College) — Ends, A. Dunsmore (Lake Forest) and Evans. 
(Millikin); tackles, Hartman (Knox) and Ghormley (Monmouth); guards, 
Yoder (Millikin) and Carlstrom (Knox); center, Barclay (Knox); quarter- 
back, West (Lake Forest) ; half-backs, Smith (Lake Forest) and Clark 
(William and Vashti); full-back, McMurray (Lincoln). 

All-Texas Eleven (by J. Burton Rix, Dartmouth) — Etnds, Perry (U. of 
Texas) and Woodhull (U. of Texas); tackles, Barnes (A. and M.) and Rams- 
dell (U. of Texas); guards, Cretcher (A. and M.) and Hooker (A. and M.); 
center, Henry (Baylor) ; quarter-back, Kirkpatrick (U. of Texas) ; half- 
backs, McHenry (Southwestern) and Puett (U. of Texas) ; full-back, Hohn 
(A. and M.). 

All-Missouri Valley Conference Eleven (by foot ball officials in St. Louia 
Republic) — Ends, Chappell (Ames) and Chauner (Nebraska); tackles, McCor- 
mick (Drake) and Shonka (Nebraska) ; guards, Hornberger (Nebraska) and 
Elliott (Nebraska); center, Wilson (Missouri); quarter-back, Warner 
(Nebraska) ; half-backs, Nipher (Washington University) and O. Frank 
(Nebraska); full-back, Ammons (Kansas). 

All-Missouri Eleven (by E. A. Remley) — Ends, Siek (St. Louis University) 
and E. Stradtherr (St. Louis University) ; tackles, Houston (Missouri) and. 
Hastings (Missouri); guards, Howe (St. Louis University) and E. Anderson 
(Missouri) ; center, Wilson (Missouri) ; quarter-back, Maguire (St. Louis Uni- 
versity) ; half-backs, Dexter (Missouri) and Painter (St. Louis University);, 
full-back, Nipher (Washington). 

All-South Atlantic Eleven (by Stanley T. Milliken in Washington Post) — - 
Ends, Bergin (Georgetown and Hegarty (Georgetown) ; tackles, Hart (George- 
town) and Wymard (Georgetown); guards, Carter (Virginia) and Bryant 
(Georgetown) ; center, Woods (Virginia) ; quarter-back, Todd (Virginia) ; half- 
backs, Costello (Georgetown) and Fury (Georgetown) ; full-back, Robertson: 
(North Carolina A. and M.). 

All-Interacademic Selection (Philadelphia Evening Telegraph) — Ends, Mur- 
dock (Episcopal) and Lippincott (Germantown) ; tackles, Pepper (Episcopal) 
and Perrott (Friends' Central) ; guards, Perry (Germantown) and Chandler 
(Episcopal); center, Butterworth (Germantown); quarter-back, Johnstone 
(Penn Charter); half-backs, Tibbott (Germantown) and Samuels (Episcopal); 
full-back, Harris (Episcopal). 

All-South Atlantic Eleven (by W. A. Lambeth, University of Virginia) — 
Ends, Dodson (Johns Hopkins) and Hegarty (Georgetown) ; tackles, Wymard 
(Georgetown) and Hart (Georgetown); guards, Bryant (Georgetown) and 
Carter (Virginia) ; center, Wood (Virginia) ; quarter-back, Todd (Virginia) ; 
half -backs, Fury (Georgetown) and Costello (Georgetown) ; full-back, Rob- 
ertson (North Carolina A. and M.). 

All-Northwest Eleven (Spokane Spokesman-Review)— Ends, Grimm (Univ. 
of Washington) and Sutton (Univ. of Washington); tackles. Bailey (Univ. 
of Oregon) and Bliss (Univ. of Washington); guards, Griffiths (Univ. of 
Washington) and Neill (Whitman College) ; center, Harter (Washington 
State College) : quarter-back. Coyle (Univ. of Washington) ; half-backs,. 
Mucklestone (Univ. of Washington) and Main (Univ. of Oregon) ; full-back^ 
Niles (Whitman College). . 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 35 

All-Nebraska Eleven (by A. F. Holste) — Ends, Marvel (Hastings) and 
Paulson (Bellevue); tackles, Parker (Hastings) and Bronson (Doane); guards, 
Bonderson (Bellevue) and Swanson (Grand Island); center, Burford (Kearney 
Normal); quarter-back, Wilkinson (Doane); half-backs, Chamberlain (Wes- 
leyan) and Carrig (Kearney Normal); full-back, McCandless (Wesleyan). 

All-Missouri Eleven (by John R. Bender) — Ends, Shuck (Missouri) and 
Morrell (Washington); tackles, T. Stradtherr (St. Louis) and Moran (St. 
Louis); guards, Hastings (Missouri) and Schloemer (St. Louis); center, Hig- 
ley (St. Louis) ; quarter-back, Maguire (St. Louis) ; half-backs, Nipher 
(Washington) and Zachritz (St. Louis); full-back, Knobel (Missouri). 

All-Illinois Minor College Eleven (by Coach Ashmore, Millikin University) — 
Ends. Evans (Millikin) and Ryan (Shurtleff); tackles, Yoder (Millikin) and 
Feiker (Wesleyan); guards, Heffernan (Wesleyan) and Faubernach (Charles- 
ton Normal); quarter-back, West (Lake Forest); half-backs, Smith (Lake 
Forest) and Gates (Knox); full-back, McMurray (Lincoln). 

All-Ohio Eleven (by Robert C. Beiser in Cincinnati Enquirer) — Ends, Lit- 
tick (Wesleyan) and Gray (Oberlin) ; tackles, Barricklow (Ohio State) and 
Hutchison (Wesleyan); guards, Raymond (Ohio State) and Portmann (Re- 
serve); center, McDaniels (Oberlin); quarter-back, Roby' (Case); half-backs, 
Heuck (Cincinnati) and Stimson (Oberlin); full-back, Thomssen (Wesleyan). 

All-Missouri Eleven (by C. E. McBride, Kansas City Star) — Ends, Adams 
(Central) and Pearis (Missouri Wesleyan) ; tackles, Elsnor (Westminster) and 
Jones (Wentworth) ; guards, Rouse (Kirksville Normal) and Israel (Kirks- 
ville Normal); center, Moorman (William Jewell); quarter-back, Coe (Mis- 
souri Wesleyan) ; half-backs, Martin (William Jewell) and Hamilton (West- 
minster); full-back, Van Dyke (Westminster). 

All-Missouri Valley Eleven (by C. E. McBride, Kansas City Star) — Ends, 
Chappell (Ames) and Chauner (Nebraska); tackles, McCormick (Drake) and 
Shonka (Nebraska); guards, Hornberger (Nebraska) and Elliott (Nebraska); 
center, Wilson (Missouri) ; quarter-back, Warner (Nebraska) ; half-backs, O. 
Frank (Nebraska) and Nipher (Washington Univ.); full-back, Ammons 
(Kansas). 

All-Detroit Preparatory School Eleven (by W. Raymond Lane, Sporting 
Editor Detroit Times) — Ends, Paterson (Central) and Boville (Central); 
tackles, Moesta (Eastern) and Duffy (Central) ; guards, Schelgelmilch (Cen- 
tral) and Cody (D.U.S.); center, Warner (Central); quarter-back, Clark 
(Central); half-backs, Power (D.U.S.) and Gregg (D.U.S.); full-back, Milroy 
(Central). 

All-Kansas Eleven (by C. E. McBride, Kansas City Star) — Ends, Solter 
(Fairmount) and Capps (Baker); tackles, Entz (Fairmount) and Holmes 
(Aggies); guards, Bishop (Washburn) and Brown (St. Mary's); center, 
Phelps (Aggies) ; quarter-back. Patton (Fairmount) ; halfbacks, Schabinger 
(Emporia Coll.) and Frazier (Emporia); full-back, Dalton (Baker). 

All-Southern Eleven (by Nathan P. Stauffer in Collier's Weekly) — Ends, 
Walton (Mississippi) and Gillem (Sewanee) ; tackles, Freeland (Vanderbilt) 
and Parker (Mississippi) ; guards, Bonner (Auburn) and Mills (Mississippi 
A. and M.); center, Morgan (Vanderbilt); quarter-back, Morrison (Vander- 
bilt); half-backs, Shields (iTississippi) and Hardage (Vanderbilt); full-back, 
McWhorter (Georgia). 

All-Ohio Eleven (by Fred. H. Sypher, Sporting Editor Cleveland Press) — 
Ends, Kipka (Case) and Axtell (Kenyon) ; tackles, Snider (Reserve) and 
Barricklow (Ohio State); guards, Hubbard (Oberlin) and Weller (Case); cen- 
ter, McDaniels (Oberlin); quarter-back. Roby (Case); half-backs, Sheppard 
(Wesleyan) and Rupp (Denison) ; full-back, Thomssen (Wesleyan). 

All-Ohio Conference Eleven (by Xen Scott and Tom Terrell in the Cleveland 
Leader)— Ends, Kipka (Case) and Hanley (Reserve); tackles, Hutchison 
(Wesleyan) and Barricklow (State); guards, Hubbard (Oberlin) and Weller 
(Case); center, McDaniels (Oberlin); quarter-back, Roby (Case); half-backs, 
Sheppard (Wesleyan) and. Stimson (Oberlin); full-back, Snider (Reserve). 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 3? 

All-St. Paul Eleven (Daily News) — Ends, Devinne (Mechanic Arts) and 
Tomasek (Central); tackles, Ellerbee (Mechanic Arts) and Warren (Central); 
guards, Anderson (Mechanic Arts) and Johnson (Mechanic Arts); center. 
Reed (Mechanic Arts); quarter-back, Jones (Mechanic Arts); half-backs. 
Townsend (Central) and Culligan (Central); full-back, Stickney (Central). 

All-Ohio Eleven (Ohio State Journal)— Ends, Gray (Oberlin) and Littick 
(Wesleyan); tackles, Barricklow (State) and Hutchison (Wesleyan); guards, 
Portmann (Reserve) and Raymond (State); center, McDaniels (Oberlin) ; 
quarter-back, Roby (Case) ; half-backs, Stimson (Oberlin) and Rupp (Deni- 
son) ; full-back. Thomssen (Wesleyan). 

All-Ohio Eleven (by H. A. Miller in Columbus Dispatch)— Ends, Littick 
(Wesleyan) and Snider (Western Reserve); tackles, Barricklow (Ohio State) 
and Hutchison (Ohio Wesleyan) ; guards, Parsons (Case) and Raymond (Ohio 
State); center, McDaniels (Oberlin); quarter-back, Roby (Case); half-backs, 
Stimson (Oberlin) and Baker (Miami); full-back, Thomssen (Ohio Wesleyan). 

Cook County High School All-Star Eleven (by Kellogg M. Patterson) — Ends. 
Barrett (Oak Park) and Pollard (Lane Tech.); tackles. Shank (Hyde Park) 
and Cotter (Oak Park) ; guards, Alberts (Wendell Phillips) and Pressnell 
(Lane Tech.); center, Wanzer (Oak Park); quarter-back, Macomber (Oak 
Park); half-backs, Russell (Oak Park) and McDonnell (Lane Tech.); full- 
back, Rice (Oak Park). 

All-Southern California Eleven (by Owen R. Bird, Sporting Editor Times, 
Los Angeles, Cal.) — Ends, Dill (Occidental) and Wight (Pomona); tackles, 
Henderson (Whittier) and Smart (Occidental) ; guards, Sanford (Pomona) and 
Jones (Occidental); center, Gillette (Pomona); quarter-back, Seay (Occi- 
dental); half-backs, Shutt (Pomona) and Brooks (Pomona); full-back, Lutz 
(Pomona). 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 39 

Some Representative Teams and Their 
Work in 1911 



HARVARD— YALE. 

The Harvard- Yale game was played at Cambridge under somewhat 
slippery conditions of field, due to the rain of the previous day leav- 
ing the soil somewhat greasy, although everything had been done that 
was possible to give a fair footing to the players. The game seesawed 
up and down, Yale having a chance fairly early in the game to score 
and Harvard later having a similar chance for a field kick. The punt- 
ing on both sides, when relieving the goal, was strong, but neither 
side could secure a sufficient advantage to become dangerous, and the 
game ended just as had the game the year before, without score by 
either side. 

PRINCETON— YALE. 

This game was played on a field of mud and slime, which caused 
the players to become almost unrecognizable after a few plunges. Yale 
was considerably stronger in the running game and in the early part 
had the play in Princeton's territory, when a miss of the snapback by 
the Yale full-back resulted in a fumble, and White, the Princeton end, 
who had made a similar play in the Princeton-Harvard game, secured 
the ball and ran two-thirds the length of the field, was tackled by 
the Yale captain just outside the goal, but slid over for a touchdown, 
which was converted into a goal. Yale later secured a field goal and 
during the latter part of the game had the play largely in Princeton's 
territory, but Princeton's defense was too strong for further scoring, 
and the game resulted in a victory for Princeton by the score of 6 to 3. 

HARVARD— PRINCETON. 

For the first time since 1896 Harvard scheduled a game with Prince- 
ton. The score in 1896 was 12 to in Princeton's favor, but last 
year the indications seemed to be that Harvard would triumph. Prince- 
ton, however, put up the best game her team had played up to that 
point in the season, the defense being particularly good. White, the 
Princeton end, romped away with a touchdown from a blocked kick, 
running two-thirds the length of the field, a performance which he 
repeated in the Yale game. Harvard later scored a touchdown, but 
also made a safety, so that the final score was 8 to 6 in favor of 
Princeton. 

PRINCETONS-DARTMOUTH. 
The Princeton-Dartmouth game, which had resulted in a victory for 
Princeton by the score of 6 to in 1910, proved a most stubborn 
contest, each side becoming threatening at times, but not being able 
to secure the necessarv score. Finally, Princeton had an opportunity 
for a long field kick, but the ball was kicked low. Just, however, as 
the danger for Dartmouth seemed averted, the ball, which was run- 
ning along fhe ground, struck on its end and took a bound over the 
goal bar, thus by the rules scoring a field ^goal and giving Princeton 
the victory by the score of 3 to 0. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL. FOOT BALL GUIDE. 41 

PENNSYLVANIA— CORNELL. 

The Pennsylvania-Cornell game promised in its early part to be a 
closer contest than the game of the year before, for although Pennsyl- 
vania took the lead, Cornell crept up until it looked as if it might be 
a very close thing. In the last period, however, Pennsylvania now 
having secured a lead, seemed to take a new lease of life and played 
the best foot ball of her season, winning out by a score of no less 
than 21 to 9. 

BROWN— PENNSYLVANIA. 
Brown's team, which has often played its poorest game against 
Pennsylvania, this time seemed to overcome stage fright and played 
the kind of game that they generally put up against Harvard or Yale. 
The score of the former year, which was 20 to in favor of Pennsyl- 
vania, was reversed, Brown winning by a score of 6 to 0. 

YALE— BROWN. 

The day for this game was ideal and the field in perfect condition. 
Both teams showed at times good running play, .but Yale was the 
stronger. Her team crowded the ball down into Brown's territory, 
scored a touchdown and was in sufficiently close proximity to Brown's 
goal to make use of the drop-kicking ability of Howe, so that the final 
score was 15 to 0, 

PENN STATE VS. PENNSYLVANIA. 

This was a most remarkable game in many ways. In 1910 Pennsyl- 
vania had defeated Penn State 10 to 9, but in the game of 1911 the 
Penn State team came with a most remarkable rush during the first 
period and their play was so bewildering that they seemed to score 
almost at will. After that the Pennsylvania team settled down and 
played very good foot ball. The lead, however, that Penn State had 
obtained was far too great for any possibilities of overcoming it and. 
although Pennsylvania scored, the final result was 22 to 6 in favor of 
Penn State. 

GEORGETOWN— VIRGINIA. 

The South Atlantic championship was decided on November 18, 
at Washington, when Georgetown, by superior playing, defeated Vir- 
ginia 9 to 0, on a muddy field. Georgetown's previous tie with the 
Army marked the team favorites in the battle, and at no time after 
the first three minutes was there danger of a Georgetown defeat. The 
scores were both made in the first half, resulting from a touchdown 
by Fury, a goal from touchdown by Wymard and a field goal by 
Costello. Twelve thousand people attended. 

MICHIGAN— PENNSYLVANIA. 

This game, which the season before had resulted in a scoreless tie, 
was very close, both sides at times playing excellent foot ball, but the 
defense was sturdy and the westerners finally barely succeeded in win- 
ning by a score of 11 to 9. 

ANNAPOLIS— WEST POINT. 

This game was played at an unusual time of the season, being 
scheduled for the same date as the Yale-Harvard game. Neither side 
showed its best quality of foot ball, but the defense was good. Annap- 
olis finally succeeded in winning by a field kick goal, score 3 to 0. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 43 

MINNESOTA— CHICAGO. 

The Minnesota team, which had defeated Chicago the year before 
24 to 0, ran up even a larger score this year, although Chicago had 
proven in her earlier game a much better organization than in 1910. 
Minnesota's running game was too much for Chicago's defense and 
the Gophers finally triumphed by a score of 30 to 0. 

MINNESOTA— WISCONSIN. 

Minnesota, having romped away with Wisconsin in 1910, expected 
a decisive victory in 1911, but the game was played under very 
adverse conditions and Wisconsin put up a plucky contest, which 
finally ended in a tie score at 6 to 6. 

CHICAGO — CORNELL. 

Chicago playejl good foot ball against Cornell and, although not 
doing as well in the matter of score as the previous year, had a 
rather hard proposition, the game finally resulting in a victory for 
the western team by a score of 6 to 0. Chicago also defeated Illinois 
and took revenge for last season in this respect. This score was 
24 to 0. Chicago repeated the same play with Wisconsin, turning the 
defeat of the previous vear into a victory of 1911 by the score of 
5 to 0. 

CARLISLE— PENNSYLVANIA. 

The Carlisle Indians took revenge for their defeat of the year 
before, putting up one of their characteristically confident games, and 
defeated Pennsylvania 16 to 0. 

CORNELL— MICHIGAN. 

Cornell played the best game of her season against Michigan. The 
score in 1910 was Michigan 12. Cornell 4, but last year Cornell tri- 
umphed with a score of 6 to 0. 

HARVARD— DARTMOUTH. 
The Harvard-Dartmouth game was an exciting and interesting one 
from start to finish. Dartmouth scored a field kick goal, but Harvard 
won the game by a score of 5 to 3. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 45 

Review of the Western Conference 
Season of 1911 

By Walter H. Eckersall. 

For the first time since the adoption of the new rules, all the 
elevens in the Western Conference, or "Big Eight," in 1911, had a 
clear interpretation of the possibilities of the new regime, and as 
.a result the contests were featured by open play in which the forward 
pass and punting were the principal factors in ground-gaining. The 
•coaches cast into the discard plays which were essential to success 
under the old rules and only those formations which were absolutely 
sure to result in substantial gains were used. 

The ruling which was passed at the 1910 meeting of the Confer- 
ence representatives, making it imperative for each eleven to play at 
least four contests with other members of the organization, had its 
results in that the strongest team was easily determined, while the 
Interest in the struggles was greater than at any time since the ten- 
yard rule was adopted. With seven-game schedules, the teams had 
opportunities of selecting three other opponents, which in the great 
majority of cases gave the Conference aggregations close and stub- 
ln>rnly fought contests. 

All the games, with the possible exception of the Minnesota-Wis- 
consin struggle, were fought and won by the best teams, and the 
season as a whole was a success considered from every angle. The 
players had clear conceptions of the playing code and as a result 
there was little of the distasteful wrangling between players and 
officials. The spectators also had a fairly clear idea of the rules, 
which in a large number of instances made the contests doubly inter- 
esting. 

There Were no changes in the coaching systems of the teams from 
the previous year, and before the season opened each mentor knew 
the caliber of the material from which he had to select his respective 
■eleven. The usual number of optimistic predictions were made before 
the opening of the season, and as the games took on greater impor- 
tance, the elevens showed marked improvement which was a strong 
point in favor of the coaching systems. The teams were developed 
gradually and pointed to the harder and more important contests at 
the end of the season. In most of these championship struggles, the 
coaches were able to place their strongest teams in the field, with 
the result that no excuses were offered for defeats. 

Rudimentary foot ball came in for more drill than it has at any 
time during the last six years, and it was due to the perfection of 
a number of cardinal foot ball points that some teams were so 
successful. Following the ball, falling on it with the desired results, 
tackling in the open, charging and getting down the field under 
punts, and thorough quizzes on the rules only were a few of the 
points in which the players were drilled every day. 

All the teams started with enough old men to warrant a successful 
season, and with the number of new players who obtained their 
schooling on the freshman elevens the year before, the coaches were 
well fortified with material which had good conceptions of what was 
to be expected of them during the season. The absolute need of good 
coaches for the freshman teams was emphasized several times when 
the regular mentors did not have to spend much time in teaching 
players rudimentary foot ball. Their chief duties t were to mould 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 47 

these players into the machine which was to give battle to opposing 
elevens. As there is a Conference rule which prohibits any of the 
squads from practicing as organized aggregations until September 
20. the coaches lost no time in settling down to hard work and 
before the first week of practice had elapsed, some of them had put 
their respective squads through the first scrimmages. The men had" 
Deen told to start training before the official opening of the prac- 
tice season and the coaches put them through scrimmage work to 
ascertain how much training the different players needed to fit them 
for the early contests, some of which were played on the Saturday 
following the opening day of practice. 

Although there were some players and coaches who expressed dis- 
satisfaction over the rules, the majority was satisfied with the code 
and after the season it expressed the wish that the rules commit- 
tee would not make too many changes. The players asserted the 
constant changing of the rules prevented them from obtaining a 
good insight into their possibilities, and they also claimed that if 
the rules are left alone long enough, the game gradually will be devel- 
oped to the point which it reached in 1905. 

A feature of the Conference season, which was a source of satis- 
faction to all interested, was the absence of serious injuries. In 
only one instance was a player disabled for the season and this was 
in the Wisconsin-Iowa contest when Pollock, the Badger half-back, had 
his leg broken. At Illinois, Seiler and Merriman. quarter-backs, had 
their collar bones broken, but both resumed play before the season 
ended. To those who have followed Conference closely, this is a 
remarkable feature as it generally has happened in the past that 
-several serious injuries have resulted. 

Unlike the season of 1910, when Minnesota and Illinois tied for 
the Conference title, the championship palm of 1911 rightfully belongs 
to Minnesota, a team which was proficient in every department of 
the game and one which completed its schedule without a defeat, 
its only black mark being the tie game with Wisconsin. With a 
wealth of material, Coach Williams developed a powerful aggrega- 
tion which was more effective with the forward pass than any eleven 
he has coached since the adoption of the play. Unfortunately, the 
Gophers were deprived of the services of their captain and best player 
before the Wisconsin game and his absence from the line-up in this 
contest greatly weakened the eleven. Captain Pickering was protested 
by Wisconsin on grounds of professionalism and the Minnesota board 
of athletic control upheld the protest and refused to play its leader. 

Wisconsin's action came in for a lot of criticism from Minnesota 
authorities and alumni because Pickering had been protested two 
days before the struggle. For a time it looked as if the Gopher author- 
ities would cancel the game, for it was claimed Wisconsin displayed 
poor sportsmanship in lodging a protest at the eleventh hour. Min- 
nesota, however, reconsidered its action and played the game, which 
resulted in a 6 to 6 tie, the ball being on Gopher one-yard line 
when the final whistle blew. In this contest quarter-back Capron 
of Minnesota performed a most spectacular feat by catching the oval 
on the initial kick-off and running through the entire Wisconsin team 
for the first score of the game. It was a great run and duplicated 
the performances which have been made in Conference foot ball in 
previous years. 

Minnesota defeated Chicago, Iowa and Illinois, three Conference 
teams, while the tie game with Wisconsin was its fourth "Big Eight" 
struggle. Nebraska and Ames were other strong teams which fell 
before the prowess of the Maroon and Gold aggregation, and in all 
these contests the Gophers played hard, aggressive and consistent 
foot ball. In half-back Rosenwald, Center Morrell and Tackle Frank, 
Minnesota had three powerful players, men who were factors in all 




fe 1-4 ... H 



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SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 49 

of the games. Rosenwald was a dashing player of the Heston type 
and he seldom failed to make ground when called upon to carry the 
ball on cross drives or end runs, while his superb defensive play and 
his ability to throw accurately forward passes made him the most 
valuable player on the team. Morrell, at center, played consistently 
in every contest. His sure and accurate passing, his ability to get 
out on the wings and do considerable tackling, and his quickness 
in sizing up plays made him a power of strength, offensively and 
defensively. 

In Frank, Minnesota was fortunate in having a lineman who was 
the nearest approach of the season to Benbrook of Michigan, who 
is conceded to be th< r-.-p a test lineman who ever played in the 
West. He was a hard, ^gressive player who mixed in every play, 
and he was down the field under punts with the ends. His effective 
tackling and smashing of plays on his side of the line made his 
services invaluable. He was absolutely dependable, and he did not 
meet an opponent all season who could successfully check him. 

As champion of the Conference colleges, Minnesota also should be 
ranked as about the strongest eleven in the West. Although it did 
not meet Michigan, Notre Dame or Marquette, three strong teams, 
the Gophers beat Nebraska, while the best the Wolverines could do 
with the Cornhuskers was to hold them to a G to 6 tie. As unfair- 
ness is shown in rating elevens on the comparative score basis, it 
would not be just to place one team ahead of another on such figur- 
ing, but it remained an open question as to whether there was a 
team in the west which could have beaten Minnesota. 

Chicago was the surprise of the season, and to Coach A. A. Stagg 
belongs all the credit that can be bestowed upon him. With a 
mediocre squad, Stagg -started the season with only fair prospects. 
Indiana was beaten in the first game and a victory over Purdue 
followed. Illinois was next on the list, and defeat for the Maroons 
was prophesied on all sides. By constant coaching and drilling, 
Stagg developed a team which decisively defeated the Orange and 
Blue eleven and raised the Maroon stock several notches. 

On the next Saturday, Chicago was forced to leave home to play 
Minnesota at Minneapolis and the Maroon rooters thought a victory 
was assured. The Minnesota eleven had been developed to a great 
height of foot ball perfection and it probably played better in this 
contest than in any of the succeeding struggles. Chicago was help- 
less and succumbed to a 30 to defeat. The Maroons were absolutely 
powerless, and the few first downs they made were the results ^f 
cleverly executed forward passes. 

Northwestern was next on the list and Chicago was the victor 
after a bitterly fought contest. Cornell followed and after the Itha- 
cans' victory over Michigan, nothing but defeat for Chicago was 
predicted. Rallying under the criticism which was heaped upon the 
members of the team from all sides, Chicago went into the Cornell 
battle determined to win and the team came off the field victors by 
a 6 to score. Wisconsin was next on the schedule and the Badgers 
succumbed to a similar defeat. 

The victory over Wisconsin entitled Chicago to second place in 
the Conference rating, and if the team had met Minnesota later in 
the season a closer game certainly should have resulted. The vic- 
tories over Cornell and Wisconsin made the season a successful one, 
which at one time gave evidences of being the most disastrous in 
years. Horace Scruby, who played guard and end was the most 
important factor in all Chicago's games His field goal kicking 
was one of the scoring assets of the Maroon eleven, while his general 
offensive and defensive play were beyond criticism. 

Captain Rademacher, tackle, and Sauer, half-back, also were impor- 
tant cogs in the Midway machine and both played a stellar brand 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 51 

of foot ball at all times. The former was a versatile lineman, who 
was equally effective on the offense and defense, while the latter 
was one of the best backs of the year in Western foot ball. Sauer 
was about the equal of Rosenwald in all departments, and his ability 
to size up plays and then move to the points of attack was a 
feature pleasing to watch. 

Wisconsin was awarded third position and its right to this place 
cannot be disputed, although Badger enthusiasts have asserted their 
team was entitled to equal ranking with Chicago for second place. 
Despite the rating of the elevens, Wisconsin had a more suc- 
cessful team than any of late years, and followers of Western foot ball 
were glad to see the Badgers assume the position they held before 
the reform wave struck Western athletics. The eleven was drilled 
in all the departments by the new coach, John Richards, who should 
make a success of the situation at Madison. In his first year he 
developed a team which nearly won the Conference title, and it came 
closer to beating Minnesota than any eleven the Gophers met. Cap- 
tain Buser, quarter-back ; Moll and Branstad, center, were three 
players who were a power of strength and they performed consis- 
tently in every contest. 

Hard luck pursued the Illinois eleven all season. After starting 
the year with bright prospects, the chances of the team being 
a factor in the Conference race were impaired with the playing of 
every game. So many of the players suffered serious injuries 
that it was impossible to place a fit team in the field in the impor- 
tant struggles. In its last game with Minnesota, the Orange and 
Blue eleven rallied and by herculean efforts held the strong Gopher 
aggregation to a 11 to score. In such a crippled condition, Illinois 
students considered such a performance in the light of a victory and 
the players were given great credit for their final effort. 

Iowa enjoyed a much better season than it has for years ; and 
the Hawkeyes are awarded fifth position. Under the able tutelage 
of Hawley, who developed a team which was more effective with 
the forward pass than any eleven since the play was adopted, Iowa 
gave all its opponents hard and close fought contests. 01 the four 
Conference games played, Iowa won two and lost two, while its 
showing in the other struggles was worthy of favorable comment. 

In Center O'Brien, Iowa had a kicker and all-around player who 
was the peer of any pivot man in the West. This player was heavy 
and fast, and he possessed foot ball intuition. He always exhorted 
his team-mates to greater efforts when an opposing eleven was gaining 
ground and in many other ways he was a most valuable player. Cap- 
tain Murphy also is a great player, and he had the satisfaction of 
piloting one of the most successful Hawkeye teams of late years. 

Purdue and Northwestern are placed on an equal basis for seventh 
position. Both institutions were represented by only average teams, 
which could not cope successfully with other members of the Con- 
ference. Lack of good material was the reason for their poor show- 
ing, although the elevens fought their opponents for every foot of 
ground until the final whistle blew. Northwestern won its only Con- 
ference game from Indiana, while the latter also gave Purdue its only 
victory over a "Big Eight" eleven. Each lost three games to Con- 
ference colleges, but they were victorious over other elevens which 
were rated as strong teams in this section. 

Indiana had its worst season of recent years. The Hoosiers were 
unable to win a single Conference game, their tie with Illinois being 
the greatest accomplishment. Lack of material and unfortunate inju- 
ries impaired the team's chances and Coach Sheldon did well to 
accomplish what he did. Captain Gill, Whittaker and Davis were 
the mainstays of the eleven and if they had been given proper sup- 
port, Indiana certainly would have had a more successful season. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 53 

At the close of the campaign dissatisfaction was expressed over 
the inability of the Conference colleges to engage in more than seven 
games. As the players only are allowed to play three years, those 
in favor of the gridiron game asserted larger schedules should be 
permitted, and there were a number who wanted Thanksgiving Day 
games. Despite these protests, the Conference season was a sue- 
cess, and as few of the elevens will be depleted to any great extent 
by loss of veterans, all the "Big Eight" colleges should be represented 
by strong elevens in 1912. 

It would be unjust to close this article without reviewing the 
work of some of the elevens in this section who are not members 
of the Conference. Although a former member of the organization 
and an institution which every true lover of athletics would like to- 
see back in the fold, Michigan had one of the most peculiar seasons 
in years. Like Illinois, the Wolverines were hampered by injuries, 
and before certain contests Coach Yost did not know just what 
players to use in the important struggles. 

After withdrawing from the Conference, Michigan opened foot ball 
relations with Pennsylvania and since 1905 Penn has been its natural 
rival. Before the largest crowd that ever saw a game on Ferry field, 
Ann Arbor, Yost's team succeeded in downing the Quakers, 11 to 9, 
in a game replete with chance plays. Shortly before the game started, 
snow began to fall which was whipped into a blizzard by a strong 
west wind. Under such conditions, good foot ball could not have 
been expected, but the teams struggled through sixty minutes of play 
unmindful of the conditions. In the closing minutes of play, half- 
back Craig got away for a forty-yard run as a result of a trick play, 
which spelled victory for Michigan and defeat for Pennsylvania. 

Michigan had a hard schedule. It played such teams as Ohio State, 
Case, Syracuse, Vanderbilt, Cornell, Pennsylvania and Nebraska. 
Yost's team was held to two tie scores, Syracuse and Nebraska being 
the elevens to throw scares into the hearts of Wolverine supporters. 
Considering the number of injured players who were not at their best 
at any time during the season, Michigan certainly made a creditable 
showing. Thomson, full-back ; Wells, end ; Captain Conklin, tackle 
and end, and Pontius, end, were men who were responsible for such 
a successful season, although some of them were kept out of the 
more important games because of injuries. 

The Michigan Agricultural College, which was coached by Macklin, 
a former Pennsylvania player, had one of the most successful seasons 
of the so-called smaller Western elevens. The team knew a lot c*f 
foot ball and it knew how to play it. Wabash college was another 
institution which had a strong eleven and which won several good 
games. 

Notre Dame and Marquette, the two leading Catholic colleges in 
the Central West, were represented by their usual strong teams. In 
their annual clash at Milwaukee, neither was able to settle suprem- 
acy and a scoreless tie resulted. Both were represented by powerful 
elevens which would have been worthy foes for any teams in the 
country. As neither team played with any of the Conference elevens, 
it is hard to form an idea of the comparative merits of foot ball 
played by either Notre Dame or Marquette, as compared with the 
"Big Eight" teams. 

Generally speaking the 1911 season in the Central West was a 
success. The contests were seen by large and enthusiastic crowds, 
the battles were fought and won on their merits, versatile players 
were developed, and plays made possible by use of the new rules 
were executed for desired results. If no changes are made in the 
coaching departments at the different colleges, it is only reasonable 
to believe that the brand of foot ball played in 1912 will be even 
better than that of a year ago. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 55 

Foot Ball in the Middle States 

By George W. Orton, University of Pennsylvania. 

With Princeton generally considered as the champion college foot 
ball team of the year, with such remarkably strong elevens as State, 
Carlisle, the Navy, Lafayette. Pennsylvania, in its concluding games, 
and other teams playing foot ball of a very high rank, the Middle 
States need take rank second to no other section of the country. 
This- was also proven conclusively in the various games played by- 
Middle States teams with elevens from the South, the West, or the 
East. Though because of Princeton's lack of offensive strength some 
critics were very loath to give her credit for full championship 
honors, the fact remains that the Sons of Old Nassau did win their 
important games and made the most of the rules as they were. Prince- 
ton and Pennsylvania's seasons will be spoken of at length in Mr. 
Camp's article on the big colleges, so we shall merely refer to them 
here as both are Middle States institutions, and no article on Middle 
States foot ball would be complete without reference to them. 

Pennsylvania had as poor a season as Princeton had a good one. 
Were it not for the fact that in the Michigan game and the Cornell 
contest Pennsylvania played ball that offensively and defensively was 
as strong and varied as any team of the year, the season of the Red 
and Blue would go down as an absolute failure. The Michigan game 
was really a victory, as many Western critics freely admitted. Mis- 
takes made by the officials robbed Pennsylvania of points that were 
fairly earned. Against Cornell, Pennsylvania played the game up to 
the highest standards of the season, not only offensively but defen- 
sively. If Princeton had her "Sam" White, Pennsylvania had in 
Captain Mercer one of the greatest running backs that the American 
game has ever developed. 

Three teams stand out very prominently from the others in the 
Middle States, namely. Carlisle, State, and the Navy. All three played 
ball that was inferior to that shown by Princeton only in the finer 
points of defensive work. In the case of the Navy, it is a question 
whether even this should be granted to Princeton. With Carlisle and 
State, whatever inferiority they may have shown in defensive work, 
they more than made up by the much greater brilliancy, variety, and 
power of their offense. It is enough to state that in comparison with 
Princeton, the acknowledged champions of the year, these teams made 
a brilliant showing and must be ranked very high. 

State College and Annapolis played a to game, which shows how 
closely they were matched. Carlisle did not meet either of these col- 
leges, but by defeating Harvard. Pennsylvania, Lafayette, and other 
strong teams they showed that they were about as fine a team as the 
Indians have ever produced. These three teams should be ranked 
together, though it must be stated that in all-round development both 
Carlisle and State were superior to the Navy. Carlisle had. in Thorpe, 
one of the greatest backs that has ever been seen in the history of 
the game. He excelled in all points. Defensively, he was a tower of 
strength. Offensivelv. he was a great factor whether running with 
the ball himself or * interfering for a mate. As a drop-kicker and 
kicker of goals from placement, he stood without a peer during the 
past season. His record of four goals from the field against such a 
high class team as Harvard had will be remembered for many years 
to come. The Navv' also had a fine kicker in Dalton, whose ready toe. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 57 

for the second successive year, proved the undoing of the Army. State 
also developed a team of exceptional brilliancy. Miller in the Penn- 
sylvania game scored from the kick-off, taking the ball through the 
entire field of his opponents, and three minutes later got away again 
for a long run and a touchdown. Captain Very again proved himself 
one of the very best ends of the season, 

Though the above three colleges are mentioned especially, there 
were several others that played the game up to a high standard. 
Pittsburgh was one of these. Its close game with Cornell and the way 
in which the State Collegians were stood off and prevented them from 
scoring except by a goal from the field, prove that the Pittsburgh 
team was the best in the history of the institution. It is plainly 
entitled to the championship of Western Pennsylvania. A team that 
should be ranked with Pittsburgh is Lafayette. Its victory over Syra- 
cuse showed that when at its best the players were a very strong 
eleven. Pennsylvania and the Indians defeated Lafayette, but Lehigh, 
Swarthmore, Gettysburg. Dickinson and Bucknell all succumbed to the 
prowess of the Eastonians. Captain Benson was chosen by many 
w r ell-known critics as All-America center. 

Swarthmore did not reach its full development until the season was 
nearly over, but in the Dickinson game the men played ball that 
would have done credit to one of the Big Four, winning by 18 to 0, 
three times the score made by Lafayette. On the season's showing 
as a whole, Swarthmore should rank here. Gieg was one of the best 
handlers and throwers of the forward pass playing the game. 

Bucknell, Lehigh, Dickinson, Ursinus, Allegheny, Franklin and Mar- 
shall, Haverford and New York University had teams up to their usual 
standard. Ursinus fell back from the previous year, but turned out a 
team that was most creditable to the size of the institution. Captain 
Thompson proved himself one of the greatest players of the year, 
being chosen by many critics as All-America tackle. Topham of 
Bucknell was also noted for his punting and general work in the 
back-field. 

The situation in Maryland was rather complicated, but though both 
Washington College and Western Maryland claim the championship of 
the State (barring the Navy, of course), the general work of the team 
and the standard of ball played in the big games would indicate that 
the honors should rest with Western Maryland. That team was con- 
sidered as the better one by the great majority of the critics. Johns 
Hopkins University had a good team, but was defeated by Western 
Maryland. 

One feature of the season's play is found in the fact that very many 
of the choices of the best All-America teams were picked from teams 
in this district. Benson of Lafayette, Very and Miller of State, 
Thorpe of Carlisle, Thompson of Ursinus, were but a few of the men 
that were considered as the best playing their positions, indicating 
that there must have been a very high standard of play through the 
colleges of these States. The fact that the Navy tied Princeton, 
-defeated West Point, and tied State, that State won from Pennsyl- 
vania, that the Indians defeated both Pennsylvania and Harvard, are 
but a few of the proofs that substantiate this statement. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 59 

South Atlantic Foot Ball 

Br W. A. Lambeth, University of Virginia. 

Foot ball conditions in the South in 1911 were of such plastie 
nature that the new game has been easily assimilated. With very 
few exceptions the quality of the game in every southern institution 
was of a higher order than during any previous year. To some extent 
this was due to the fact that the rules of the modern game enabled a 
greater number of men to play — men who were physically excluded 
in the old game. But to a greater effect the ready success with the 
new game was due to the fact that the old game had never crystal- 
ized ; it was more feebly developed than in the larger eastern colleges. 
Some apprehension is felt and frequently expressed in connection 
with the rules as revised for 1912. This is generally regarded as the 
first sign of yielding to the pressure of the larger colleges for the 
restoration of the old plunging, hammering game. It is to be hoped 
that this is not an indication of surrender, and that some compen- 
sation for yielding to the demand for four downs in ten yards has. 
been secured by the removal of some of the restrictions upon the 
forward pass. 

ALL-SOUTH ATLANTIC TEAM. 

Dodson (Johns Hopkins) and Hegarty (Georgetown), ends. 

Wymard (Georgetown) and Hart (Georgetown), tackles. 

Bryant (Georgetown) and Carter (Virginia), guards. 

Wood (Virginia), center. 

Todd (Virginia), quarter-back. 

Fury (Georgetown) and Costello (Georgetown), half-backs. 

Robertson (North Carolina A. and M.), full-back. 

Of the many selections for honors in this group the above has been. 
those most generally chosen and in the opinion of the writer deserve* 
the places given them. 

At center, Wood of Virginia has been the popular choice. Through- 
out the season and in ail his games, notwithstanding the influence of 
the distracting responsibilities of the captaincy, he was a conspicuous 
figure — -conspicuous in both offense and defense, and brilliantly so in. 
the latter. 

Bryant of Georgetown and Carter of Virginia have earned the- 
laurels as guards, Carter playing at right. Both men are strong rn~ 
their positions, Bryant being the faster, but Carter the more effective. 

Wymard and Hart, both, of Georgetown and both veterans, were not 
approached by competitors. This will be their last season and the 
game loses two of the best tackles the South has seen. 

Dodson of Johns Hopkins was the best left end playing in 1911, 
while Hegarty of Georgetown is chosen for rignt end. Dodson is the 
faster, but Hegarty is the most valuable. 

Todd of Virginia is given a place at quarter-back, for he is the 
most valuable man in the section in running back punts and general 
open field play. For the two halves, Fury and Costello, both of George- 
town, are in a class by themselves, Fury the most powerful, but 
Costello the more versatile. Costello is undoubtedly the best foot ball 
player in this section. Robertson of North Carolina A. and M. is. 
given a position at full-back because he is the strongest man available 
for short gains. 




1, Day; 2, Roth; 3, Brown; 4, Lindsay, Mgr.; 5, Kelley; 6. Rawson; 7, 
Wagonhurst; 8, Bockus; 9, Steel; 10, Propst; 11, Furry; 12, Marshall; 13, 
Hammond; 14, Spiegel; 15, Royer; 16, Boas; 17, Dannyhauer, Capt. ; 18, 
Benson; 19, Pardee; 20, Gross. 

LAFAYETTE COLLEGE, EASTON, PA. 




1, Sheridan, Trainer; 2, Knox; 3, Crighton; 4, Ackerly; 5, Vela; 6, Bianco; 
7, McCaffrey; 8, Reiter, Coach; 9, Goyne; 10. Dayton; 11. Wylie, Capt.; 12, 
Bailey; 13, Hauser; 14, Smith, Mgr.; 15, Flick; 16, Pazzetti. 
LEHIGH UNIVERSITY. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 61 



All-South Atlantic Foot Ball Team 

By Stanley T. Milliken, Washington Post. 

Not in the history of foot ball in the South Atlantic section has 
there been such an array of talent as there was during the season 
of 1911. The influx of new material was partially responsible for 
this. The eleven named below appears to be the greatest that has 
ever been whipped together for this division, many of the players' 
work standing out so prominently that their choice is undeniable. 

Georgetown had the greatest eleven in her history and from her 
Tanks seven men are chosen. The Blue and Gray was far above any 
other team in the South Atlantic States and played more hard 
.games during the season than all the other teams combined. 

Georgetown's linemen were matched against some of the best in 
the country, but in the test they more than held their own, while 
her backs ran opposing ends almost at will. One could take the 
■entire Georgetown eleven a,nd sweep the South Atlantic States. She 
defeated the best team south of the capital when Virginia was taken 
into camp. 

Yet* the writer believes that there are four positions which can be 
strengthened and for these places men whose work has stood out 
prominently on other teams have been chosen. Of these, three are 
from Virginia and one from the North Carolina Agricultural and 
Mechanical College. 

Starting at center, Wood of Virginia has been given the call over 
Cunniff of Georgetown. Wood's playing in the Georgetown-Virginia 
.game won him the place. The Virginian had the better of his rival 
for three-quarters of the play, although Cunniff's weight wore him 
down at the end. Both are good passers. 

Right guard is given to Bryant of Georgetown. Bryant's best 
work was against the Army where he tore great holes in the Cadets' 
line and played a stellar game on the defense. The other guard goes 
to Carter of Virginia, whose ability to open up holes and stop plays 
W T as of great aid to his team. Despite great weight he is exception- 
ally fast on his feet and bids fair to develop into one of the great- 
est linemen in the country. Floyd of Carolina A. and M. gave both 
men a rub for their selection. 

The tackles are the easiest positions to decide. Hart and Wymard 
of Georgetown were never outplayed during the year. Hart is in a 
class by himself. He broke through every lino that opposed him, 
made tackles, recovered fumbles, blocked kicks and often downed the 
runner for a loss. Wymard's value comes from his ability to quickly 
diagnose plays and open up holes. So great was his knowledge of 
making a gap that it was through him that the majority of George- 
town's off-tackle plays were sent. Both were good receivers on the 
forward pass. 

Two Georgetown players. Hegarty and Bergin, have been picked 
for the ends. The first mentioned is fast in getting down the field, a 
flanker that is hard to pass, and a deadly tackier. Bergin starred 
in all of the big games, showed great adeptness in recovering fum- 
bles, and was at all times alert and watchful. 

The back-field is made up of Todd of Virginia at quarter, Costello 
and Furv of Georgetown at the halves, and Robertson of Carolina 
A. and M. at full-back. The sterling performances of Costello and 
Pury are well known, this pair having swept the ends of opposing 
teams almost at will. Todd is the equal of this pair for speed and 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 63 

is placed at quarter on account of his cool head and judgment, 
although he played most of the season at half-back on his own team. 

The above trio is rather light and therefore a plunging full-back 
is needed for rounding out the whole back-field. By picking Robert- 
son of Carolina A. and M. the problem is solved. He is a big man, 
can hit the line low and hard, and is strong on defense. White of 
Georgetown would be second picking for this place, while Sitterding 
of Georgetown would make a capable substitute for Tojid at quarter. 

Costello would do the drop-kicking for the eleven, he being the 
best in the South in this respect. He would also be called upon 
for the punting. Nielsen, the man who built up Georgetown's great 
team with its dazzling assortment of plays and interference, is named 
as coach of the secti >nal eleven, while Hart is given the captaincy. 

ALL-SOUTH ATLANTIC TEAM. 

Bergin (Georgetown) and Hegarty (Georgetown), ends. 

Hart (Georgetown) and Wymard (Georgetown), tackles. 

Carter (Virginia) and Bryant (Georgetown), guards. 

Wood: t (Virginia), center. 

Todd (Virginia), quarter-back. 

Costello (Georgetown) and Fury (Georgetown), half-backs. 

Robertson (N. C. A. and M.), full-back. 



&"'--£>: 



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* A. % W ■ L 

»a 29 30 ' 3 , 32 33 "*34j 



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1, Chez, Director; 2, Quirk; 3, Williams; 4, Heiskel; 5, Carter; 6, Taylor; 
7, H. Hodges; 8, Amos; 9, Harrison; 10, Lueder, Coach; 11, Pepper; 12, 
Smith; 13, C. Hodges; 14, MacRae; 15, Boyles; 16, Martin; 17, Floyd; 18, 
Bell, Capt. ; 19, Kerr; 20. Niedemeyer; 21. Davis; 22. Bachman; 23, King; 
24, Leatherwood; 25, M. Watkins, Asst. Mgr. ; 26, Phillips; 27, Nell v. Coach: 
28, Bell; 29, Kaltenbach; 30, Gunnee; 31, Easley; 32, Speer; 33, W. Watkins; 
34, Adams; 35, Walkup, Mgr. 

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, MORGANTOWN. W. VA. 






-f 12. r »3 



g"m 



rl, If- 



1, Callahan; 2, H. Lambert; 3, Ollom; 4, Kendle: 5. Young; 6, England; 7, 

Ruckman, Capt.; 8, Feeney; 9, Brackman; 10, Cornwell; 11. 0. Lambert; 

12, Farmer; 13, Archer; 14, Ramsey; 15, Carter; 16, Chambers; 17. McVey. 

MARSHALL COLLEGE, HUNTINGTON, W. VA. Proctor, Photo. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 65 



All-Southern Foot Ball Team of 1911 

By Nathan P. Stauffee. 

(Permission of Collier's Weekly.) 

First Team. Position. Second Team. 

Walton, Mississippi End Vandergraef, Alabama 

Freeland, Vanderbilt Tackle Cogdell, Auburn 

Bonner, Auburn Guard Metzgar, Vanderbilt 

Morgan, Vanderbilt Center Adams, Mississippi 

Mills, Mississippi A. & M Guard Peacock, Georgia 

Barker, Mississippi Tackle Stoney, Sewanee 

Gillem, Sewanee End Goree, Tech. 

Morrison, Vanderbilt Quarter-back Williams, A. & M. 

Shields, Mississippi Half-back Sikes, Vanderbilt 

Hardage, Vanderbilt Half-back Cahall. Mississippi 

McWhorter, Georgia Full-back Davis. Auburn 

In my travels among American colleges I found this year in Dixie- 
land something rare in university life. Our Southland is unique in 
having the largest group of colleges in these United States playing 
all sports under one set of laws administered by one body — the 
Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association. This association comr 
prises the States of Kentucky, South Carolina. Georgia, Tennessee, 
North Carolina, Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi. (Texas and 
other States were formerly members, but have since withdrawn to 
form separate associations of smaller size.) This large Southern asso- 
ciation has existed since December, 1894, and lived in comparative 
harmony since then — something else rare among American colleges. 
It has done a wholesome work in developing a healthful athletic spirit 
and in elevating the ideals of sport. 

To appreciate the wonderful work being done by athletes in the 
South one must understand the distances traveled in order to meet 
any opponent — this year Auburn. Sewanee. and Mississippi journeyed 
to Arkansas, Texas, Alabama, Mississippi and Georgia, over three 
thousand miles, to play three games — trips caused by a scarcity of 
near opponents. Members of the S. I. A. A. are nearly all State 
universities, colleges of Statehood strength with eligibility rules of 
the highest, and leading for this higher amateur and scholastic spirit 
in the South has been Vanderbilt, with much of the credit due its 
athletic chairman, Professor W. L. Dudley. 

The season of 1911 in Dixieland was notable for many things : 
(1) The first and most important being the absence of any fatal or 
distressing injuries; (2) Vanderbilt's decisive winning of the South- 
ern championship; (3) the inability of any team (except a markedly 
superior eleven) to score except on a fumble or forward pass; (4) the 
number of important games decided on drop-kicks, fumbles, or forward 
passes (legal or intercepted) ; (5) the success of the forward pass in 
the hands of Vanderbilt, Georgia Tech., A. and M., and Tulane, and 
its fa^ure or non use at critical fi^es by Auburn or Mi^sissinoi in 
their important games ; (6) the high-class kicking of all varieties ; 
(7) games more interesting to the uninitiated spectator. 

For the first time in many years Vanderbilt is the undisputed cham- 
pion of the South. Usually Texas and Arkansas have entered strong 
claims for the coveted honor, but little Sewanee this year disposed of 
Texas and in turn Texas disposed of Arkansas. 

In addition, Sewanee defeated Alabama and Tulane and made credit- 
able showings against every one, but succumbed to Vanderbilt — 31 



66 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 




Gillem, 


Hardage, 


McWhorter, 


Walton, 


Bonner, 


Barker, 


Sewanee, 


Vanderbilt, 


Georgia, 


Mississippi, 


Auburn, 


Mississippi 


End. 


Half-back. 


Full-back. 


End. 


Guard. 


Tackle. 



. to 0. Thus does Vanderbilt owe Sewanee a debt of thanks for giving 
the Commodores such an undisputed claim. 

The fight for second place narrows to Auburn, as, undefeated by 
any S. I. A. A. team, she won from A. and M. by one touchdown 
(A. and M. having defeated L. S. U.), defeated Tech. on an inter- 
cepted forward pass, and with a badly crippled team held Georgia to 
a tie — the latter defeating Tech., Sewanee, and Alabama by decisive 
scores. Several writers, especially Vanderbilt men, give University of 
Mississippi second place on her great showing at Vanderbilt because 
ehe defeated Mercer with Mercer's strongest team by a larger score 
than Auburn, and trounced Mercer 30 points greater than Georgia, 
but Auburn had a more consistent record in the face of great misfor- 
tunes. A. and M. of Mississippi is given third place because of a 
uniformly good record. 

For captain and quarter-back of this All-Southern team I would 
unhesitatingly choose Morrison of Vanderbilt. I have seen all the 
great American quarter-backs since 1900, and he loses nothing by 
comparison — the man he most resembles is Daly, the Harvard captain 
and ex-West Pointer. He is a great general, a fast thinker, a won- 
derful dodging runner and a great kicker, and only has one weakness ; 
he cannot drop-kick. Another real leader is Williams of A. and M., the 
brains of the Mississippi Farmers. His playing standard fell after he 
was injured, but he has brains, fire and dash ; Woodruff of Georgia and 
Randolph of Mississippi are good, while Newell of Auburn is a fair 
quarter ; but none possesses the self-confidence or the great art of 
Morrison of pulling a game out of a hole. 

Two men stand head and shoulders above all candidates for the 
center position — Morgan, 6 feet 3 inches, 236 pounds, has passed the 
ball two years beautifully for Vanderbilt ; tie keeps the opposing 
defensive half-back out of many plays, and Is a good defensive man. 
Adams of Mississippi would have won the place had he not been 
Injured before he met Morgan. Adams is 6 feet 1 inch and 180 
pounds. 

Guards were above the average. Bonner of Auburn was one of the 
best I have seen. 

Another consistent performer is Mills of A. and M. (Mississippi), 
a 200-pounder of willing frame and growing experience ; his defense 
in many games saved yards for the Farmers. Metzgar and Brown 
(Vanderbilt) are stars and would be my choice had they stopped the 
Mississippi players from gaining over them: Causey (Mississippi), 
Stoney (Sewanee), Allen (Mississippi A. and M), and Peacock (Geor- 
gia) have played fine games all year. 

Tackle is easy to pick. Freeland (Vanderbilt) would maks any 
American team : his 196 pounds of aggressiveness are in every play ; 
tils work on defense is a treat to see, while his tackling under punts 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



67 




Shields, 
Mississippi, 
Half-back. 



Mills, Morrison, 

Mississippi A.& M., Vanderbilt, 
Guard. Quarter-backo 



is superb. Barker (Mississippi) for his first year was not far behind 
Freeland. and will make a valuable man next year, as his 190 pounds 
are combined with speed. Brown (Vanderbilt), Cogdell (Auburn), 
Maddox (Georgia), Covington (Vanderbilt), Ramsey (Kentucky), and 
Countess (Alabama) are men any team would be glad to possess. 

The ends find Walton (Mississippi) and Gillem (Sewanee) excel- 
lent defenders. The former, with a long reach from his 6 feet of 
height and 180 pounds of bone and muscle, made Vanderbilt avoid his 
end, and his speed in catching Morrison in an open field shows his 
ability and spirit. Gillem is speedy and a good tackier, while his 
punting averages close to 45 and 50 yards. These qualities, combined 
with an ability to make good at drop-kicking in close finishes, stamps 
him as invaluable to any team. Goree of Tech., is another fine all- 
round end, and Vandegraef (Alabama) is an inspiration to his team. 
N. Brown (Vanderbilt) is a good man under kicks, and can stand a 
lot of punishment. McGehee (A. and M.) and Garrett (Tulane) 
played fine ball, being especially valuable in open field work. 

First-class back-field men. were plentiful, the best two being Har- 
dage (Vanderbilt) and McWhorter (Georgia). Hardage is a beautiful 
dodger, acquiring speed easily ; McWhorter is almost as good, and a 
better line plunger, due to his twenty pounds in weight over Hardage. 
Shields (Mississippi) is another fast man of the Hardage style, and 
a greater defensive player. His tackling is clean and deadly, while 
his punting is finely placed, and averages over 45 yards. Mitchell 
(Mississippi) is a hard runner, as is Myers (Sewanee) and Jennings 
(A. and M.) ; Sikes (Vanderbilt) will be a wonder before he finishes 
his career, and his side partner, Collins, is bound to share in it. Davis 
(Auburn) is a strong runner, but has a fatal tendency to slow start- 
ing : this would delay any back-field, so I would move him to the 
line, where his fine defensive work would be of greatest value. Cahall 
(Mississippi) is a strong runner and fine kicker. On this team I 
would have a line that would be over 6 feet in height., average 190 
pounds, and be fast under kicks and a most powerful defense. In 
Morrison we have one of the best generals that ever wore a shoe — 
he could forward pass, or end run, or get off quick on side kicks. In 
our backs — McWhorter, Shields and Hardage — we have three fine 
defensive men who can easily foretell forward passes, and each man 
is quick at picking openings or running in a broken field. McWhorter 
I would use at full-back because of his 180 pounds of good line- 
plunging, combined with fine open field and end running. Shields 
could be depended upon to do all sorts of punting, and Gillem could 
be allowed to spend all his time drop-kicking. McWhorter and Mor- 
rison would run back -punts in a style to delight everyone. This 
team is one that would make any All-America team realize that the 
Southland had stars equal to the best. 



I. $ % ? '*. M 

* % f I • t t I 



1, Van Hook, Mgr.; 2, Rogers; 3, Mc Andrews, Trainer; 4, Dunn; 5, Pauxtis, 
Coach; 6, Jacobs; 7, Brenneman; 8, Stafford; 9, Brown; 10. McGregor; 11, 
Besbore, Capt. ; 12, Hertzler; 13, Felton; 14. Lambron; 15, Leidig; 16, Pearl- 
man; 17, Goldstein; 18, Sheaffer; 19, Shearer. Hensel, Photo. 
DICKINSON COLLEGE, CARLISLE, PA. 




1, Price, Coach; 2, Behney; 3, Erickson; 4, R. Thompson; 5, Seaman; 
Potteiger: 7, Minich; 8. Lockart. Mgr.; 9, West; 10, Douthett; 11, K. Thomp- 
son. Capt.; 12, Yoh; 13, Gay: 14, Posey; 15, Bransome; 10, Mitterling; 17„ 
Shellhamer; 18, Kichline. 

URSINUS COLLEGE. COLLEGEVILLE. PA. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 6$ 

Foot Ball in New England 

By J. B. Pendleton, Bowdoin. 

The one noticeable feature of the past season was the increased 
power of all the teams when on the defense and a keenness in sizing. 
up the opponents' offensive plays. On the whole, the coaching was of 
a higher class than usual and, as a rule, the New England colleges 
command the best. 

One of the strongest and most versatile elevens ever sent out from 
Dartmouth began early in the season to show the master hand in its 
style of play. Its early games were almost too easy to give one a co - 
rect idea of what later was going to be shown at Princeton. This. 
game was a hard one to lose, for the team played in a way that cer- 
tainly was deserving of a tie and, though defeated by a fluke goal 
from the field, which, under the rules as they then stood, left no option, 
for the official except to allow it, gained really more glory for Dart- 
mouth than if victorious, for college men everywhere admire a good 
loser, and Princeton men all consider that the spirit shown that dajr 
in the face of such a defeat was typical of the highest sportsmanship. 

Dartmouth is fortunate in her graduate coach and he is bound to- 
make his team win even greater glory during the coming season. 

At Brown again we notice the decided benefits due to a competent 
coaching force and, year after year, the team, with a limited substi- 
tute list, takes on one of the hardest schedules played and comes 
through with glory to itself and joy for its loyal followers. 

Brown's material in 1911 was not as high class as in 1910, but 
nevertheless the season was a success. The clean-cut victory over 
Penn was an attainment that the team had been striving for for a, 
long time. In the Yale game Brown's opponents were almost at th ir 
top notch form, and while the previous victory was not repeated, yet 
the work was good and the defeat far from a rout. 

Williams, with a new coach, did not strike its stride until the sea- 
son was far advanced. With a small squad of 'varsity material, welL 
equipped with spirit, they preoared themselves to win their games with 
New York University. Wesleyan, Amherst and Cornell, and were suc- 
cessful in all but the last, which proved one of the most exciting ever 
seen in Ithaca, Cornell finally winning by a goal from the field in 
almost the last minute of play. 

At Amherst the season was not a decided success, although the tepm 
made the most ot the opportunities presented and refused to acknowl- 
edge defeat, even when it was evident that such would be thp final m 
result. They have a way at Amherst of coming back the following * 
year and there is every indication of a successful season there in 1912. 

Trinity brought additional fame to itself by going through the entire 
season without a defeat. With almost the smallest squad of candi- 
dates among the colleges, they seem to enter into the contests as 
though their very lives depended upon it. The tie game with Brown 
was a noteworthy event, but their gamest contest and most spectacu'ar 
win occurred with Wesleyan, when, with defeat staring in the face and 
an almost unsurmountable score against them, they rallied, and in the- 
last few minutes scored twice and won. 

Wesleyan did not have as good a season as was anticipated. The- 
men played for all they were worth and at no time was there a lack: 
of spirit, but things did not come their way. and they, like some- 
others, are looking forward to a more propitious season. 




1, Izant, Asst. Mgr. ; 2, Barnes; 3, Wells; 4, Hoagland; 5, Cook; 6, Hanley; 
7, Backowski; 8, Stroup; 9, Elden, Student Mgr.; 10, Shulman; 11. Reycraft; 
12, Lind, Asst. Coach; 13, Snyder, Coach; 14, Kagy, Asst. Coach; 15, 
Fovargue; 16, Dr. von den Steinen, Graduate Mgr.; 17. Evans; 18. Mortimer; 
19, Snider, Capt. ; 20, Mowry; 21, Portmann; 22. Knight; 23, Spurney; 24, 
Geraci; 25, Hollinger. 

WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY, CLEVELAND, OHIO. 



-. ;; 5 ' -■■'■. c 



■ ■ ■ 




BUCHTEL COLLEGE. AKRON. OHIO. 



Bungden, Photo. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 7} 

Holy Cross is improving each year, and there is no reason why, in a 
short time, its foot ball teams should not occupy as high a position as 
its base ball teams, and surely no one could ask for more. 

Tufts' representatives, benefited by unusually good coaching, played 
out a hard schedule, but with results not wholly satisfactory. With 
new material to help out the old, the coming months will certainly 
bring their fair share of victories. 

In Maine the struggle was as keen as ever and, while .the teams 
were very evenly matched, yet the honors rightly belong to the 
University of Maine. 

Norwich University and University of Vermont both showed the 
results of good coaching and play a game that warrants their getting 
on the schedules of some of our larger universities. 

The annual Andover-Exeter game was, as always, one of great 
interest, and while Exeter apparently had a chance, yet it was on 
paper only. It has been a long time since Exeter has celebrated a 
victory over her much esteemed rival, but each season finds her hopeful 
and working with might and main to bring this about This contest 
is a Harvard- Yale game in miniature, with all the thrills and excite- 
ment that any gridiron can produce, and while the rivalry is intense, 
yet the grade of sportsmanship is of the highest. 

The following represents a high class All-New England 'varsity team : 

Ashbaugh (Brown) and Daley (Dartmouth), ends. 

Elcock (Dartmouth) and Bartlett (Brown), tackles. 

Whitmore (Dartmouth) and Kulp (Brown), guards. 

Gibson (Dartmouth), center. 

Sprackling (Brown), quarter-back. 

Snow (Dartmouth), Hudson (Trinity) and Hogsett (Dartmouth), back-field. 




1, E. J. Stewart, Coach; 2, S. S. Nichols, Mgr.; 3, Bodenhorn; 4, C\ Dot- 
terer; 5, Pierson; 6, Deemer; 7, Longfellow; 8, Baker; 9, Gilbert; 10, 
Thomas; 11, Lavely; 12, W. Dotterer; 13, Miller; 14, Hawk, Capt. ; 15. 
Abbott; 16, Townsend; 17, Wieler. 

ALLEGHENY COLLEGE. MEADVILLE, PA. 







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1, Claire; 2, McCulloch, Asst. Coach; 3, Crawford; 4, Ramsdell, Coach; 5, 
Dr. Marks, Asst. Coach; 6, De Muth; 7, Lamoree. Mgr. ; 8, McCully; 9, 
Patterson; 10, Welch; 11, Schmucher; 12, Finkel, Asst. Mgr.; 13, Kessel- 
raan; 14, Buck; 15, Balsinger; 16, Taylor, Capt.; 17, Acheson; 18, Lucas; 
19, Ayres. Chautauqua Photo Co., Photo. 

CARNEGIE TECHNICAL SCHOOLS, PITTSBURGH, PA. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 73 

Foot Ball in Western Pennsylvania 

By Edward M. Thierry, Pittsburgh. 

There was no question about the intercollegiate foot ball champ- 
ionship in Western Pennsylvania and West Virginia during the 
season of 1911. The Penn State College team scored a distinctive 
And unequivocal triumph, clinching it by defeating the University of 
Pittsburgh team, its most formidable rival, 3 to 0, on Thanksgiving 
Day. 

In view of Penn State's remarkable campaign there is slight wonder 
that it was declared champion. And in this connection the Pittsburgh 
team has no small measure of satisfaction in the knowledge that 
it was only beaten by the narrow margin of a goal from placement. 
With State first and Pittsburgh second in the final summary, third 
place is given on the strength of competitive scores to Washington 
And Jefferson College, fourth place to West Virginia University and 
fifth to Carnegie Tech Schools. 

State made a record unprecedented, having victories to its credit 
over Cornell and the University of Pennsylvania and a no-score tie 
with the Navy. This was no mean feat, when it is considered that 
the Navy was one of the strongest teams in the East, having put 
np such a strong battle, in which defeat was not theirs, against the 
Princeton champions. State beat Cornell 5 to 0, while Pennsylvania, 
which had a surprisingly weak team in 1911, was beaten 22 to 6. 
Villanova was defeated 18 to and Colgate 17 to 9, while Geneva 
and Gettysburg were literally swamped, 57 to and 31 to 0, respec- 
tively. 

The game between Pittsburgh and State for years has been a 
Thanksgiving Day fixture, with rivalry strong and strength usually 
•equally divided. Last year Pittsburgh was the victor and the con- 
sequent sectional champion. Last fall Pittsburgh did very well, 
only being beaten by Cornell and Carlisle and holding the strong 
Notre Dame University team to a scoreless tie. But, considering 
State's phenomenal sweep, the experts had expected a more severe 
■defeat on Thanksgiving Day. State won and became the permanent 
possessor of the magnificent Spalding trophy, but there was no 
little satisfaction in Pittsburgh owing to the fact that the Univer- 
sity played the swift State machine to an excellent draw, the only 
thing that gave the State team the victory being a goal booted 
from placement by their whirlwind full-back, Mauthe. It has been 
announced that the Spaldings will offer another trophy, to be won 
by virtue of three legs on it. as was the other. 

Aside from the loss of the handsome trophy, which had been placed 
In competition several years before, through the generosity of A. G. 
Spalding & Brothers, the Pittsburgh players were widely commended 
because their goal was uncrossed, so far as a touchdown was 
concerned. They put up a brilliant game, but the early injury of 
•Quarter-back Tillie Dewar deprived them of the services of a field 
general and they were lacking in headwork. It was the general 
opinion that ha£ Dewar been able to remain in the game, Pittsburgh 
would have scored at least one touchdown. Hube Wagner, the Uni- 
versity team's sterling end, carved his name deeply in the tablet of 
fame. He punted in poor luck, but his tackling and running were 
pronounced the equal of that of White, Princeton's All-America' 
-end, or any other player on the college gridiron. 

Pittsburgh beat Washington and Jefferson, its other ancient rival, 
ttwelve days before Thanksgiving, by the decisive score of 12 to 0, 



? ' i Vf » § ?* If 

If 

. 13* ■ . 14 mhi 






^i#> 



1, Soles; 2, Dillon; 3, Feightner; 4, Stevenson; 5, L. B. Hurst, Graduate 
Mgr.; 6, Wagner; 7, Quailey; 8, Smith; 9, Galvin; 10, Blair; 11, Kernohan; 
12, Joseph H. Thompson, Coach; 13, Dewar; 14, Brown; 15, Lindsay, Capt. ; 
16, Gehlert; 17, Leahy; 18, Graves; 19, Connelly. Johnston, Photo. 

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH. 






1, Clarke. Graduate Mgr.; 2, Baker. Mgr.; 3, Alderfer; 4. Ferrell; 5, Nickels; 
6, Bastian; 7, Cordray, Coach; 8, Johnson; 9, Shannon; 10. Conner; 11, 
Brumbach, Capt.; 12, Bastian; 13. Prindle; 14. Preston; 15, Babcock; 16, 
Stong, 17, Lucas; 18, Brown; 19, Groscup; 20, Black; 21, Pott. 
WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 75 

and the week previously triumphed over Villanova by a similar 
•total. Neither side scored in the Notre Dame game, while Cornell 
won from Pittsburgh by the score of 9 to 3. In the third game 
of the season, after 24-0 and 22-0 victories over Westminster and 
Ohio Northern, the Pittsburghers lost to the Carlisle Indians. 17 to 0. 

Although Washington and Jefferson was beaten by West Virginia, 6 
to 5, the former team ranked third in view of other showings. The 
Navy overwhelmed West Virginia 32 to 0, but was only able to 
beat Washington and Jefferson, 16 to 0. As another example. West 
Virginia barely nosed out the Westminsters 3 to 0, while Washington 
and Jefferson swamped them, 33 to 0, nine points more than even 
Pittsburgh scored. Again, Allegheny, a team ranking with Westmin- 
ster and Geneva, both of whom Washington and Jefferson beat easily, 
won from West Virginia, 10 to 6. Thus, the fair conclusion is that 
West Virginia was extremely lucky to defeat Washington and Jefferson 
by the slim margin of one point, 6 to 5. The only other teams the 
Mountaineers won over were Ohio University, 3 to ; Wesleyan, 36 
to 0, and Marshall, 17 to 16, none of which teams figured very high 
in college foot ball. Besides holding the Navy to a 16 — score, 
Washington and Jefferson kept Cornell down to a 6 — count and 
beat Villanova, 11 to 6. 

It will be noted that the three chief rivals — State, Pittsburgh and 
Washington and Jefferson — played just two teams in common, aside 
from their inter-team games. These were Cornell and Villanova. 
State defeated Cornell, 5 to ; Pittsburgh lost, 9 to 3,. and Washington 
and Jefferson lost. 6 to ; State defeated Villanova, 18 to .0: Pitts- 
burgh won, 12 to 0. and Washington and Jefferson won. 11 to 6.. Both 
comparisons place the three teams in this order : State, Pittsburgh, 
Washington and Jefferson. 

As for the Carnegie Tech, the fifth member of what has been 
termed the "Big Five," they showed little strength, although they 
had such a famous man as "Tex" Ramsdell, the ex-Pennsylvania star, 
as coach. Tech, during its few years of existence, has been ham- 
pered in foot ball — as are most all technical schools — by the 
unusually hard curriculum, making it difficult for students to get out 
for practice. There were lots of material, plenty of enthusiasm and 
athletic inclinatio.n, but studies stood in the way. This is not often 
the case where college foot ball is concerned, but Carnegie Tech. 
school is different. There were 2,500 students to pick from, but their 
hands were literally tied. 

Right here, I desire to make the prediction that in ten or fifteen 
years Carnegie Tech. will rank athletically with the biggest col- 
leges in the country. More millons are being spent on buildings 
than in any other institution of learning in the world, and in that 
gpace of time there will probably be twice as many students. At 
no great future date Carnegie Tech. will be a foot ball power to 
be reckoned with nationally. 

As for coaches, the Pittsburgh team again had Joe Thompson, 
ex-Pittsburgh star, who turned out a championship eleven in 1910. 
Washington and Jefferson once more had Dave Morrow, former star 
center, while State was coached by "Bull" McCleary, a few years ago 
that College's star full-back. They turned out some clever players 
during the year, as evidenced by the unusual uniformity of the 
all-star selections. 

Six men stood out in a class by themselves, being the unanimous 
choice for their respective positions of four Pittsburgh writers. These 
men are Galvin of Pittsburgh, center ; Miller of State, quarter-back ; 
Wagner of Pittsburgh, and Very of State, ends ; Mauthe of State, 
full-back, and Brown of Pittsburgh, half-back. Tibbens. was the only 
Washington and Jefferson man picked on any team, three of the writ- 
ers selecting him for tackle and one for half-back, he having played 






1, Pottinger, Asst. Mgr.; 2. Crowe; 3, Zange; 4, Bissmeyer; 5, Hicks; 6, 
Allen; 7, Goheen; 8, Cummings: 9, Manager; 10. Howard; 11, Tilden; 12, 
R. Henck; 13, Stewart: 14. W. Henck, Capt. ; 15, Easton; 16, Feuker; 17, 
Perry; IS, Hall; 19, Krampe; 20, Klein; 21, Buchanan; 22, Flohr. 

UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI. Bellsmith. Photo. 




1, St. John, Ath. Dir. ; 2. Rathinell; 3, Briggs; 4, Hartsock; 5. Garver; 6, 
Davis; 7, Baker, Asst. Coach; S, Hutchison: 9, Shively; 10, Johnson; 11, 
Clausing, Mgr. ; 12, Jones; 13, Little; 14. Thomssen, Capt.; 15, Hicks; 16, 
Littick; 17, Severence; IS, Rathbun; 19, Shepherd; 20, Hyer. 

OHIO WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY. DELAWARE, OHIO, 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 77 

both positions. Dewar of Pittsburgh was the choice of three for 
half-back. He really played quarter, but Miller's super-excellence kept 
him out of that berth, yet no other half-back, besides Brown, was 
•strong enough to keep him from representation. 

Bebout of State, a former Pittsburgh High School star, was picked 
by three for guard, while Blair of Pittsburgh was chosen by two 
for guard and by one for tackle. Harlowe of State was the choice 
of two for tackle, while Engle of State was chosen by one for guard 
and by another for tackle. Feightner, Leahy and Stevenson, all of 
Pittsburgh, each got on one team, the first named as a tackle and the 
other two as guards. 

In all, the four writers picked but fifteen different men, six of 
whom were unanimous. Very, an end, was Walter Camp's choice on 
his second All-America team, but throughout Western Pennsylvania 
it is stoutly contended that Wagner of Pittsburgh rather outclassed 
him. 

As for the scholastic teams of Western Pennsylvania, Shadyside 
Academy, and Greensburg High School were practically tied for the 
championship. Johnstown High was also a contender and shared 
in the honors. Shadyside claimed supremacy because of defeating 
Pittsburgh High School, one-time champions, 5 to 0, while Greens- 
burg only beat Pittsburgh, 8 to 6. With first place a tie. Pitts- 
burgh High was generally conceded second place. East Liberty 
Academy third, Washington and Jefferson Academy fourth and Wil- 
klnsburg High School fifth, 




1, Baldriuge; 2, Martin; 3, Tibbins, Capt. ; 4, Beck; 5, Montgomery; 6, 
Dunmire; 7. Holden; 8, Steele; 9. Gettemv; 10, Baer; 11, Goodwin: 12. Moody; 
13, Whitehill; 14, Wallace; 15, Pierce; 16. Alexander; 17, Hannah; 18, 
Ingham; 19, Smith; 20, Cunningham; 21, Schwab; 22, McClure. Weller, Photo. 
WASHINGTON AND JEFFERSON COLLEGE. 




1, W. A. Sohl, Mgr.; 2, Nolting; 3, Hartman; 4, Diehl; 5. Draper; 6, Hayes; 
7. Stein: 8, Maclav; 9. M. E. Stine. Asst. Mgr.; 10. Kalbach; 11. Pontius; 
12, Wood; 13, P. H. Bridenbaugh, Capt.; 14, Jaeger; 15, Sykes; 16. Glidden; 
17, Sohl; 18. Schaffner. Miesse, Photo. 

FRANKLIN AND MARSHALL COLLEGE, LANCASTER. PA. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 79 

All-Ohio Conference Eleven for 1911 

By C. W. Savage, Oberlin College. 

Eight months after the close of a foot ball season it would be rank 
presumption for any writer to try to pick an All-Ohio Eleven from the 
wealth of material representing the eleven Ohio Conference colleges 
-during the season of 1911. Instead of such a course, I am glad to 
insert the selections of the Cleveland Plain Dealer and those of the 
Ohio State Journal of Columbus, which represent the opinion of two 
of the foremost sporting editors of the State, one in Northern Ohio.- 
-and one in Central Ohio. 

Plain Dealer. Position. Ohio State Journal. 

.Axtell, Kenyon Left End Gray, Oberlin 

Hutchison, Wesleyan Left Tackle Barricklow, O.S.U. 

Raymond, O.S.U Left Guard Portman, Reserve 

MacDaniels, Oberlin Center MacDaniels, Oberlin 

Weiler, Case Right Guard Raymond. O.S.U. 

Barricklow, O.S.U . .Right Tackle Hutchison, Wesleyan 

Gray, Oberlin Right End Littick, Wesleyan 

Roby, Case Quarter-back Roby, Case 

Shepherd, Wesleyan Left Half-back Stimson, Oberlin 

Stimson, Oberlin Right Half-back Rupp, Denison 

Snider, Reserve Full-back Thomssen, Wesleyan 

Probably more satisfactory to players and coaches and all others 
Interested in foot ball than either of the two teams selected above is 
the summary of votes collected from eight foot ball critics in the 
State by the Cleveland Plain Dealer. According to the votes cast the 
•complete summary is as follows : 

For ends — Axtell, Kenyon, 4 ; Hanley, Reserve, and Littick, W r esleyan, 
3; Gray, Oberlin and Kioka, Case, 2; Snider, Reserve, and Pyle, Ober- 
lin, 1. 

For tackles — Barricklow. State, 7 : Hutchison, W T esleyan, 5 ; Mark- 
ley, State, 2 ; Snider, Reserve, 1 ; Thomssen, Wresleyan, 1. 

For guards — Raymond, State, 6 ; Weileiy Case, 4 ; Parsons. Case, 3 ; 
Hubbard, Oberlin, 1 ; Portman, Reserve, 1, 

For center — MacDaniels, Oberlin, 8. 

For quarter-back — Roby, Case, 8. 

For half-backs — Stimson, Oberlin, 7 ; Shepherd, Wesleyan, 5 ; Kupp, 
Denison, 3 ; Baker, Miami, 1. 

For full-backs — Thomssen, W r esleyan, 6 ; Snider, Reserve, 2. 

This statement shows Roby of Case and MacDaniels of Oberlin as the 
leading two foot ball players of Ohio. I think no one would question 
the standing of these men. The loss by graduation of players of 
such remarkable ability as that possessed by them will be severe for 
Ohio foot ball. Barricklow of State* and Stimson of Oberlin each 
liave seven votes. Guard Raymond of State and full-back Thomssen 
of Wesleyan and Shepherd of the same team have five apiece. In 
.addition to the players thus selected as favorites by the eight experts, 
it seems to me that there should he mentioned at least two other 
players of fine ability, who in some way were overlooked by those 
experts. These are left end Pyle of Oberlin who played a steady and 
•consistent end and who was scarcely less brilliant than Gray, and 




1, White; 2, Long; 3, Hinaman, Coach; 4, Mickelweight; 5, Taylor; 6, 
Miller; 7, Burrell; 8, Shields; 9, Riley; 10, Lewis, Capt. ; 11, Kenney; 12 t 
Gibson; 13, Jones; 14, R. Jones; 15, Bean. 

OHIO UNIVERSITY, ATHENS, OHIO. 




1, Walkins; 2, Wickenden; 3, Haskins; 4, Feixer; 5, Curtin; 6, Deeter; 7. 
Rumsey. Mgr. ; 8, Martin: 9, Thompson; 10, Forsythp; 11 Rupp Capt.; 12, 
Hewins; 13, Ashley; 14. Cramer; 15, Heinrichs; 16, Morrow; 17 Wood; 18, 
Phelps; 19, Shropp. 20. Dunlapp. Tresize. Photo. 

DENISON UNIVERSITY, GRANVILLE, OHIO. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 81 

Rupp of Denison. This latter player certainly deserves a place on the 
honor roll. He was a glutton for work and rarely failed to deliver 
when called upon in pinches. 

There is no doubt that a team selected from players mentioned above 
would make a remarkable showing against any all-star team similarly 
selected from any other section of the country. Ohio coaches grasped 
much of the possibilities of the new game and were not afraid to 
take long chances at critical points. Ohio foot ball to my mind com- 
pares favorably with foot ball played in any other section of the 
United States, either east or west. 



Foot Ball in Ohio 

By C. W. Savage, Oberlin College. 

Foot ball as a game beneficial to players and fascinating for specta- 
tors made good in Ohio in 1911. All eleven teams of the Ohio 
Conference colleges were well coached, and most of the men handling 
non-conference teams also showed a thorough appreciation of the great 
possibilities of modern foot ball. If there were any real failures 
among the Ohio coaches it was not apparent, and the work of several 
of these men deserves special mention. Hinaman of Ohio University 
and Dawson at Mt, Union turned out remarkable teams when the size 
of their institutions and previous records of the schools are considered. 
Xen Scott of Case and Glen Gray of Oberlin produced the two great 
surprises among the Big Six teams, each bringing a bunch of green 
players, hardly worthy of mention at the beginning of the season, up 
to the highest point of efficiency at its close. The records for the 
Ohio Conference colleges for the season were as follows : 

W. L. Tie PC. W. L. Tie PC. 

Oberlin 4 1 1.000 Reserve 2 3 2 .400 

Case 5 1 1 .833 Ohio Univ 1 2 1 .333 

Ohio State 4 1 2 .800 Wittenberg ... 1 4 .200 






1 


1.000 


1 


1 


.833 


1 


2 


.800 


2 





.750 


1 


1 


.667 


2 


2 


.428 



Wesleyan 6 2 .750 Miami 1 4 .200 

Cincinnati 2 1 1 .667 Wooster 3 

Denison 3 2 2 .428 Kenyon 6 

The above table shows Oberlin again holding first place. This 
is a remarkable achievement for both the team and Coach Gray. At 
the beginning of college, Captain MacDaniels at center, one guard, 
a halfback, and two substitute linemen, made up the nucleus around 
which Coach Gray and Assistant Coach Nichols had to build ap a 
team. The return to college in October of two more veterans strength- 
ened Oberlin's prospects a little, but the critics throughout the state 
gave to the Oberlin squad little more than passing consideration as 
a possibility for finishing in the first division. In addition to the 
lack of veterans Oberlin was short on new material, and worst of all 
she was embarking upon a new system of coaching with two of her 
own graduates of the previous year, G. C. Gray and J. H. Nichols, 
in charge, appointed as year-round coaches with faculty ranking. 
That Oberlin met this situation, played through a heavy schedule, 
and reached the end of her season, defeated only by Cornell, is cer- 
tainly an extraordinary achievement. Much credit for the success 
of the season must be given to Captain L. H. MacDaniels, the unani- 
mous choice of all foot ball writers of the state for All-Ohio center. 
Always full of spirit and aggressiveness, and a player of wonderful 
endurance, MacDaniels made an ideal captain. He played through 




1, Reiter, Coach; 2, Herlihv; 3, Aumend; 4, Snodgrass; 5, Drumm, Capt. ; 
6, Humphrey; 7, White; 8, Sutton; 9, Sawtelle; 10, Metcalf, Mgr. ; 11, 
Wieser; 12, Robinson; 13, Levering; 14, Dunbar, Asst. Mgr.; 15, Fresho" r : 
16, Brown. 

MARIETTA (OHIO) COLLEGE. 




1, Knight, Graduate Mgr. ; 2, Kohr ; 3. Weygandt : 4, Finley ; 5, Ross ; 6, 
Kilpatrick ; 7, Evans; 8, Compton; 9, Wallace, Student Mgr.; 10, Reed; 11, 
Revenaugh; 12, Yohannon ; 13, Lloyd, Coach; U, White; 15. Cunningham; 
16, Crookes; 17, McSweeney ; 18, Wauser ; 19, Collins, Capt.; 20, Roderick; 
21, Hackett. 

WOOSTER (OHIO) UNIVERSITY. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 83 

his entire three years in 'varsity foot ball without an injury or ever tak- 
ing time out. This is a tremendous record for a man weighing only 158 
pounds. 

The fine record of Case School as runner-up was hardly less re- 
markable than Oberlin's. Coach Scott attained wonderful results with 
his material for a first year coach, and brought his team from being 
considered unworthy of notice up to a real contender before mid- 
season. It ought also to be noted that the Case players trained under 
most adverse conditions, since a large part of their practice work 
was done by electric light because of long hours in shop work and 
laboratory. The strength of the Case team was in all-round team 
play rather than in individual stars, with the one remarkable excep- 
tion of Captain Roby at quarter. This player was the only other 
unanimous choice for the All-Ohio team. Captain Roby was almost, 
if not quite, 50 per cent, of the Case team's offensive strength. He 
was not only a great field general, but an extraordinary performer, 
being a punter and drop-kicker of high class and the best open-field 
runner in the state. In defensive work also he was a sure and deadly 
tackier and his remarkable speed made him a most valuable foot ball 
player, both on offense and defense. Without Roby the Case team 
would have been only ordinary, with him it was one of the best teams 
that that institution has put out in many years. 

The record made by the Ohio State University, the third team in 
the ranking was a distinct disappointment. With twice or three times 
as much available material as any other institution in the state, 
the Capitol City team should naturally have found no difficulty in 
eliminating her opponents in the Ohio Conference. It was probably 
this wealth of material more than anything else that made the devel- 
opment of a real team such a difficult task for Coach Vaughan. 
Toward the end of the season Ohio State was coming strong and were 
Coach Vaughan to take hold next season where he left off last, he 
would undoubtedly develop a team capable of making a much better 
record. Probably the best game of the season was that with Syracuse 
at Columbus on November 25, when State was finally defeated on a 
fluke play which resulted in a run of 70 yards for a touchdown, 
Syracuse winning by a score of 6 to 0, after having been played 
practically to a standstill. 

The fourth team in standing was the one that undoubtedly proved 
the biggest disappointment of the season. With practically his entire 
team composed of veterans, Coach St. John was expected to turn 
out a pennant winner. The Wesleyan record was so good in the 
season of 1910 that it seemed sure that the record of 1911 would 
be better. The team started the season apparently where it had 
stopped the previous year. It had little difficulty in eliminating 
all opponents up to October 28 when it was defeated, although not 
outplayed by Ohio State, at Columbus, by a score of 3 to 0. Wes- 
leyan easily defeated Miami on November 4, but met her Waterloo 
at Cleveland when Case won on November 11 by the score of 16 to 6. 
It would seem however, that the tremendous strength of this team 
offensively, especially in mid-field work, was the real undoing of 
Wesleyan's pennant aspirations. So easy was ground gained by this 
powerful machine that it felt that it could score at ease, but when 
the 10 and 15-yard lines of their opponents had been reached, the 
going was so much harder that invarialy the onward march of Wes- 
leyan was stopped and the ball lost to opponents. Injuries, too, 
severely affected the chances of this team. In spite of the fact that 
Wesleyan stands fourth in the percentage column it is to be noted 
that she played eight Conference games and lest only two. 

The season of 1911 was the first season of Cincinnati University 
as a Conference college. The team played only four Conference games, 




1, Boley; 2, Maloney, Mgr. ; 3, Hyland; 4. Marsh; 5, Whelan; 6. Kenyon; ., 
Post, Trainer; 8, Scott, Coach; 9, Young; 10, Randall; 11, McAfee; 12, 
Kipka; 13, Slater; 14, Roley, Capt.; 15, Weiler; 16, Glaser; 17, Goss; 18, 
Francy; 19, Parsons. Moore, Photo. 

CASE SCHOOL OF APPLIED SCIENCE, CLEVELAND, OHIO. 




1, Waters, Ccach; 2, Rettig; 3, Spragne: 4, Boatty; 5, Cook; 6, Wonders; 
7, Tasman, 8, Wickham; 9, Rhorabaugh; 10, Carr; 11, Lewis; 12. Downe; 
13, Bowlus; 14, Porter, Mgr.; 15, Dickinson; 16, Langmade; 17, Anderson. 

KENYON COLLEGE. GAMBIER, OHIO. Baker, Photo. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 85 

winning two, losing one, and tieing one. The team was a good one 
and played first class foot ball. This year Cincinnati will certainly 
have to be considered a championship possibility. 

Denison University put out a strong team last year and, with the 
record of three games won, two tied, and two lost, made the best 
showing since the university has been in the Conference. 

The record of the Western Reserve University team was a disap- 
pointment, even greater than that of Ohio Wesleyan. Reserve had 
an abundance of fine material, an experienced coach with a fine 
record of championship teams back of him, and a schedule wisely 
planned. Nevertheless, injuries and reverses so disrupted the team 
that it never reached a high standard of efficiency. Its best perform- 
ance was the scoreless tie played with the Navy at Annapolis on 
October 28. 

Ohio University was another team playing its first year under 
Conference rules. It means a big jump toward winning teams from 
one that never scored a point in 1910 to a team that won better 
than half of its games in 1911, though it must be remembered that 
at least half of the games won were with elevens outside of the 
Ohio Conference. With Coach Hinaman again engaged for 1912 
Ohio University will need to. be watched. 

Wittenberg, Miami and Wooster had fair teams. Kenyon is so weak 
numerically that her teams are not regularly expected to be as strong 
as those representing other Conference colleges. The remarkable fight- 
ing qualities and the unquenchable spirit of this little institution are 
such, however, that it is always sought as an opponent. 

Of the teams outside of the Ohio Conference, Hiram, Buchtel, Ohio 
Northern, Mt. Union, Otterbein and Marietta are the ones most 
deserving mention. The record of Mt. Union under Coach Dawson 
was remarkable, the team's exhibition being invariably that of a 
well oiled machine. Coach Dawson certainly brought great credit 
upon himself as a foot ball mentor. It is undoubtedly true that 
the type of foot ball displayed by Mt. Union was on a par with that 
played by any of the Ohio Conference teams. Buchtel had to develop 
new material to fill the vacancies of the preceding year. By mid- 
season Coach Haggerty had developed a team, of great strength. This 
is particularly true of the defensive work. The record made by the 
team was very creditable to both coach and the institution. 

In closing this review the writer wishes to make an apology for 
its incompleteness. It is a difficult thing to attempt a review of a 
foot ball season eight months after it has occurred, especially if one 
has not been asked in time to gather notes and statistics while the 
season was in progress. For the sake of Ohio foot ball it is to be 
hoped that an earlier and more satisfactory arrangement can be made 
for the season of 1912, which at this distance promises to be a 
banner year in Ohio foot ball. 



9 fn ^... H . 



X 2l 2,2 . ^ 2.4, 2,5 , ab. 



1, Smith; 2, McGay; 3, Stubbs; 4, Bartlett; 5, Hubbard; 6, Brown; 8, Chamber- 
lain; 9, Kimball; 10, Facon; 11, Curry; 12, Butler; 13, Brown: 14, Collins, Mgr.: 
15, Proudfoot; 16, Guettir; 17, Parsons; 18, Cook; 19, Whiteman; 20, Mad- 
den; 21, Fitts; 22, Connelly, Capt.; 23, Baumann; 24, Bishop: 25, Sibley; 26, 
Hubbard. AMHERST (MASS.) COLLEGE. Kinsman, Photo. 



f % 1 A ■ * J§ ■ ^ 


1 




1 


I 3> B 3 1 




1 


^L >9 A ; *L 3L» i^S&gP^ 3 JL**^^* 


1 



1, Turner; 2, Rice; 3, Oaks; 4, Mason; 5, Walker; 6, Garfield; 7, Prindle; 8, New- 
ton; 9. Anderson; 10, Cook, Mgr. 11 Lewis, 1? Neagle; 13, Chapman: 14, Kellogg; 
15, Linder, Capt.; 16, Fish; 17, Mears; 18, Michael; 19, Ainslee: 20, Campbell; 
21, Phillips; 22, Goodson, Mascot; 23, Toolan; 24, Payson; 25, Vinal. 
WILLIAMS COLLEGE, WILLIAMSTOWN, MASS. 




1, Arnold; 2, Kelly; 3, Barrett; 4, Williams; 5, Vandervort; 6, Hixon, Mgr.; 
7, Hartman; 8, Peele; 9, Inwood; 10, Lewis; 11, Bales, Coach; 12, Hagen; 
13, Morgan; 14, McMillan; 15. Bloom; 16, Miais, Capt. ; 17, Faulkner; 18, 
Oren. 

WILMINGTON (OHIO) COLLEGE. 




1, Wycoff, Mgr.: 2, McGregor; 3. Gauchat; 4. Blythe; 5, Pritchard; 6. Carson; 
7. Dawson, Coach; 8. StoulYer; 9. Gibson: 10. Monnier, Capt.; 11, Whinnery; 
12, Wolfe; 13, Lovell: 14, Vinberham; 15. Neuschutz; 16, Beck, 

MT. UNION COLLEGE, ALLIANCE, OHIO. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



Alterations in Rules for 1912 

The chief changes in the rules for the season of 1912 may be 
outlined in a few words, although their effect on the play will be 
considerable. The principal alteration was the addition of an 
extra down. Instead of three trials in which to advance the ball 
the specified distance of 10 yards, four are allotted. In other 
words, while the necessary average to the down last season was 
2>}i yards, this distance now becomes 2% yards. 

The field has also quite materially changed, as will be seen by 
reference to the diagram printed on the page preceding the rules 
in this Guide. The field was formerly 330 feet long. The goal 
posts have now been brought in so that the distance from one 
goal line to the other goal line is now 300 feet or an even 100 
yards," but behind each goal the extra space, 10 yards, thus cut off 
is retained for the purposes of the forward pass; that is, a player 
may receive a forward pass in this end zone and it will still be 
legal. Formerly if a forward pass crossed the goal line it was, a 
touch-back for the defenders of the goal, no matter whether an 
opponent caught it or not. Owing to the changes in the field 
the kick-off instead of being made as formerly from the middle of 
the field, the 55-yard line, will now be made from the 40-yard line 
of the side that is doing the kicking, that is, 60 yards from the 
goal towards which the ball is being kicked. 

One other change of importance is that on the kick-out the 
opponents, instead of lining up on the 25-yard line of the oppo- 
nents' goal, line up on the 20-yard line, and the ball must be 
kicked from some point behind that 20-yard line. 

The intermission between the first and second and third and 
fourth periods has been shortened from two minutes to one 
minute. 

Only one man of each side, instead of three, will be allowed to 
walk up and down the side lines. The office of field judge has 
been dispensed with and the three officials will now be the 
Referee, Umpire and Linesman. The restriction that the for- 
ward pass should not go over 20 yards has been removed and a 
-forward pass of any distance is legal. The on-side kick has been 
<eut out altogether; that is, a kicked ball striking the ground does 
not put the kicker's side on-side. The balance of the changes 
are of lesser importance. An endeavor has been made to sim- 
plify the rules and make the arrangement more satisfactory. 



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SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 91 

Official Foot Ball Rules, 1912 

Copyright, 1912, by American Sports Publishing Co. 



RULE I. 

FIELD. 

Section 1. The game shall be played Dimensions, 
upon a rectangular field, 360 feet in length 
and 160 feet in width. The lines at the 
ends of the field shall be termed End Lines. 
Those at the sides shall be termed Side Lines 
and shall extend indefinitely beyond their 
points of intersection with the goal lines. 
The Goal Lines shall be established in the 
field of play ten yards from and parallel to 
the end lines. The space bounded by the 
goal lines and the side lines shall be termed Field of Play. 
the Field of Play. The spaces bounded by 
the goal lines, the end lines and the side £ n( j z ones# 
lines shall be termed the End Zones. 

Section 2. These lines shall be marked Marking, 
in white and the Field of Play shall be 
marked at intervals of five yards with white 
lines parallel to the goal lines. 

NOTE. — Previous to the beginning of play f 
the Referee shall see that the field is properly 
marked. 

Section 3. The goal posts shall be placed Goal, 
in the middle of each goal line, shall exceed 
20 feet in height and be placed 18 feet 6 
inches apart, with a horizontal cross-bar 
10 feet from the ground. 

RULE II. 

BALL. 

Section 1. The ball shall be made of Ball, 
leather, enclosing a rubber bladder. It 



92 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE II. 

shall be tightly initiated and shall have the 
shape of a prolate spheroid— Circumference, 
long axis, from 28 inches to 28% inches; 
short axis, from 22% inches to 23 inches. 
Weight, from 14 ounces to 15 ounces. 

RULE III. 

PLAYERS AND SUBSTITUTES. 

Number of Section 1. The game shall be played by 
Players, two teams of eleven men each. 

Substitutes. Section 2. A player may be substituted 
for another at any time, but before engaging 
in play must report to the Referee or Umpire. 
A player who has been removed during the 
game may return once at the beginning of 
a subsequent period. A player disqualified 
or suspended may not return to the game. 

P E N A LT Y (Rbfebee or Umpire) 

Fop not reporting— Loss of 15 yards. 
For illegal return— Loss of 15 yards and 

the player shall be suspended from the 

game. 

Equipment of Section 3. No player having projecting 
Players, nails or iron plates on his shoes or any pro- 
jecting metallic or hard substance on his 
person shall be allowed in the game. If head 
protectors are worn, no sole leather, papier 
mache, or other hard or unyielding sub- 
stance shall be used in their construction. 
All devices for protection must be so 
arranged and padded as, in the judgment 
of the Umpire, to be without danger to 
other players. Leather cleats upon the 
shoes shall be allowed. 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

Suspension, unless the fault is corrected 
within two minutes. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 93 

RULE IV. 

LENGTH OF GAME. 

Section 1. The length of the game shall Length of 
be 60 minutes, divided into four periods of Periods. 
15 minutes each, exclusive of time taken 
out, though it may be of shorter duration 
by mutual agreement between the managers 
or captains of the contesting teams. 

In case no such agreement has been 
reached 10 minutes after the time scheduled 
for beginning the game, the Referee shall 
order the game to proceed and the full time 
shall be played. 

Section 2. Whenever the commencement Darkness, 
of a game is so late that in the opinion of the 
Referee there is any likelihood of the game 
being interfered with by darkness, he shall, 
before play begins, arbitrarily shorten the 
four periods to such length as shall insure 
four equal periods being completed and 
shall notify both captains of the exact time 
thus set. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

For refusal to abide by' the opinion of the 
Referee under Section 2— Forfeiture of the 
game. 

Section 3. (a) There shall be one Intermission, 
minute intermission between the first and 
second periods and between the third and 
fourth periods, during which time no player 
shall leave the field of play, nor shall any 
representative of either team be allowed on 
the field of play, except as provided for in 
Rule XXV., Sections 2 and 3. 

P EN ALTY (Refekeb, Umpire) 

Loss of 15 yards. 



94 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE IV. 

(6) There shall be fifteen minutes inter- 
mission between the second and third 
periods. The Referee shall cause both 
teams to be notified three minutes before 
said intermission has expired. Fifteen 
minutes after the close of the second period, 
the Referee shall blow his whistle on the 
field, and in case either team is not ready 
to play within two minutes thereafter, 
the offending side shall be penalized 25 
yards and the ball must be put in play by 
a scrimmage. For further delay apply last 
paragraph of penalty under Rule XVI., 
Section 3. 
Time extended. Section 4. Time shall not be called for 
the end of a period until the ball is dead, but 
in case of a touchdown the try-at-goal shall 
be allowed. In case of a fair catch made 
after time has expired, the kick shall be 
allowed and time shall be called when the 
ball is next declared dead. 

RULE V. 

SCORING. 

Scoring. The game shall be decided by the final 
score at the end of the four periods. The 
following shall be the value of plays in 
scoring: 

Touchdown, 6 points. 
Goal from touchdown, 1 point. 
Goal from the field, 3 points. 
Safety by opponents, 2 points. 

The score of a forfeited game shall be 1 
to in favor of the offended side. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 95 

RULE VI. 

DEFINITIONS. 

Section 1. A Place-kick is kicking the Place-kick, 
ball after it has been placed on the ground. 

A Kick-off is the term used to designate Kick-off. 
the opening play of the first and third 
periods and it shall consist of a place-kick 
from the forty-yard line of the team entitled 
to kick. 

After a goal from the field and after a 
try- at -goal following touchdown, the ball 
must be put in play by a kick-off. 

A Punt is dropping the ball from the Punt, 
hand or hands and kicking it before it 
touches the ground. 

A Punt-out is a punt made by a player Punt-out. 
of the side which has made a touchdown, to 
another of his own side for a fair catch. 

A Drop-kick is dropping the ball from the Drop-kick, 
hand or hands and kicking it the instant 
it rises from the ground. 

A Kick-out is a drop-kick, place-kick or Kick-out. 
punt made by a player of the side which 
has made a safety or a touchback. 

A Free-kick is any kbk when the oppo- Free-kick, 
nents are restrained by rule from advancing 
beyond a certain point before the ball is put 
in play and includes Kick-off, Kick-out f 
Punt-out, Kick from a Fair Catch, and 
Place-kick for Goal after a touchdown. 

Section 2. Snapping the ball is putting Snapping the 
it back from its position on the ground with ball, 
one quick and continuous motion of the 
hand or hands or of the foot. 



96 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE VI. 



Scrimmage. Section 3. A Scrimmage takes place 
when the holder of the ball places it fiat 
upon the ground, with its long axis at right 
angles to the line of scrimmage and puts it 
in play by snapping it back. The scrim- 
mage does not end until the ball is dead. 
Line of The Line of Scrimmage for each side is 

Scrimmage, an imaginary line parallel to the goal line 
and passing through that point oi the ball 
nearest the side's own goal line. 

(It is evident from the definition that 
there must be two lines of scrimmage, one 
for each side, thus separating the two for- 
ward lines by a space equal to the length of 
the ball.) 

If the snapper-back aoes not hold the 
long axis of the ball as specified, the ball 
must be put in play over again. 
Off-side. Section 4. A player is Off-side when the 
ball has last been touched by one of his 
own side behind him. 

Faiv Catch. Section 5. A Fair Catch is catching the 
ball after it has been kicked by one of the 
opponents and before it touches the ground, 
or in similarly catching a "punt-out" by 
another of the catcher's own side, provided 
the player (except in case of punt-out, where 
no signal is necessary), while advancing 
toward the ball, signals his intention of 
making a fair catch by raising his hand 
clearly above his head and does not take 
more than two steps after making the catch. 

(See illustrations Nos. 9 and 10, Page 153.) 

Not a fair catch. It is not a fair catch if , after the kick, 
the ball was touched by another of the 
catcher's side before the catch. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 97 

RULE VI. 

The mark of the catch is the spot at which iMark of catch 
the ball is actually caught. 

Opportunity to make a fair catch is where Opportunity to 
the player is in such a position that it would make fair catch 
be possible for him to reach the ball before 
it touches the ground. 

Section 6. A Goal from Touchdown is Goal from 
made by kicking the ball from the field of Touchdown, 
play over the cross-bar of the opponents' 
goal, by a place-kick direct, or by a place- 
kick preceded by a punt-out. 

If the ball passes directly over one of the 
uprights, or if, after being kicked, it strikes 
an opponent and then passes over the cross- 
bar or one of the uprights, it shall count a 
goal. In no case shall it count a goal if the 
ball, after leaving the kicker's foot, touches 
the ground before passing over the cross- 
bar or uprights. 

Section 7. A Goal from the Field is Goal from the 
made by kicking the ball from the field of Field, 
play over the cross-bar of the opponents' 
goal in any way except by a punt or a 
kick-off. 

If the ball passes directly over one of the 
uprights, or if, after being kicked, it strikes 
an opponent and then passes over the cross- 
bar or one of the uprights, it shall count a 
goal. In no case shall it count a goal if the 
ball, after leaving the kicker's foot, touches 
the ground before passing over the cross- 
bar or uprights. 

Section 8. A Foul is any violation of a Foul. 
rule. 



Out of Bounds 



Hurdl 



ling. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE VI. 

Section 9. The ball is Out of Bounds 
when either the ball or any part of the player 
who holds it touches the ground on or out- 
side the side line or side line extended. 
Tripping. Section 10. Tripping is obstructing a 
player below the knee with that part of 
the obstructing player's leg that is below 
the knee. Mere diving under the play is 
not tripping. 

Section 11. Hurdling as used in the 
rules applies only to the man carrying 
the ball. 

Hurdling in the open is jumping over or 
attempting to jump over an opponent who 
is still on his feet. (A man who is on his 
knee may be hurdled without penalty.) 

Hurdling in the line is jumping over or 
attempting to jump over a player on the 
line of scrimmage, with both feet or both 
knees foremost, within the distance of 
5 yards on either side of the point where 
the ball was put in play. 

Section 12. A Down occurs when the 
Referee blows his whistle or declares the 
ball dead. 

NOTE— The Referee should never blow his 
whistle to indicate a foul, but if he inad- 
vertently does so the ball is dead and the play 
shall stop. 



D 



'own. 



Ball is dead. 



Section 13. The Ball is Dead (and no 
play can be made with it except according 
to rule) : 

When the Referee blows his whistle or 
declares that a down, fair catch, touch- 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 99 

RULE VI. 

down, touchback, safety or goal has been 
made. 

The Referee should blow his whistle or 
declare the ball dead: 

(a) When a player having the ball goes 
out of bounds, cries "down," or is so held 
that his forward progress is stopped, or 
when any portion of his person, except his 
hands or feet, touches the ground while he 
is in the grasp of an opponent; 

(b) When the ball goes out of bounds 
after a kick, before touching a player who 
is on-side; 

(c) When a forward pass becomes an in- 
completed pass, or when the ball, after being 
passed forward, goes out of bounds, or over 
the end line, or strikes the ground in the 
end zone, or strikes the goal bar or posts ; 

(d) When a kicked ball (except a kick-off 
or free kick) strikes the goal bar or posts, 
or goes over the goal line before being 
touched by a player of either side; 

(e) When on a try-at-goal after touchdown 
the goal has either been made or missed; 

(/) During enforcement of penalties. 

Unless otherwise specified the ball is dead 
at the spot where it was when the Referee 
blew his whistle or declared it dead. 

Section 14. A Touchdown is made when Touchdown. 
the ball lawfully in possession of a player is 
declared dead by the Referee, any part of it 
being on, above or behind the opponents' 
goal line. 

The Touchdown is marked at the point, 
not where the ball is carried across the line, 



100 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE VI. 

but where the ball is declared dead by the 
Referee. If the ball is carried across the 
extension of the side line the touchdown is 
marked at the intersection of the side line 
and the goal line. 
Touchback. Section 15. A Touchback is made when 
the ball in possession of a player guarding 
his own goal is declared dead by the Referee, 
any part of it being on, above, or behind 
the goal line, provided the impetus which 
sent it to or across the line was given by 
an opponent. 

It is a Touchback when a kicked ball 
(other than one from kick-off, free kick, 
or one scoring a goal from the field) goes 
over the goal line before being touched by 
a player of either side. If such a ball strikes 
the uprights or cross-bar it shall be con- 
sidered as having crossed the goal line. 

It is a Touchback when a player who is 
off-side and within the opponents' 10-yard 
line, is touched by a ball kicked by one of 
his own side. 

It is a Touchback when a forward pass 
crosses either the end line or side line ex- 
tended; when it strikes the goal posts or 
cross-bar, or when it touches the ground 
within the end zone. 

It is a Touchback when a player on de- 
fense permits a ball, kicked by an opponent, 
to strike his person and then roll across the 
goal line and he or any player of his side 
then falls on it back of the line. 
Not a It is not a Touchback if such player jug- 
Touchback. gles the ball so that he in any way forces 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 101 

RULE Vi. 

it over the line and he or any player of 

his side then falls on it. 

It is a Touchback if a foul is committed 
behind the opponents' goal line by the side 
which put the ball in play. 

Section 16. A Safety is made when the Safety, 
ball in possession of a player guarding his 
own goal is declared dead by the Referee, 
any part of it being on, above or behind the 
goal line, provided the impetus which caused 
it to pass from outside the goal line to or 
behind the goal line was given by the side 
defending the goal. Such impetus could 
come : 

(a) From a kick, pass, snap-back or fum- 
ble by one of the player's own side; 

(6) From a kick which bounded back from 
an opponent or from one of the kicker's own 
side, who, when struck, was behind his goal 
line; 

(fc) In case a player carrying the ball 
is forced back, provided the ball was not 
declared dead by the Referee before the 
goal line was reached or crossed. 

A Safety is made when a player of the 
side in possession of the ball makes a 
forward pass which becomes incompleted 
behind his goal line or commits a foul which 
would give the ball to the opponents behind 
the offender's goal line. 

A Safety is made when the ball, kicked 
by a man behind his goal line, crosses the 
extended portion of either side line. 

Section 17. Crawling is an attempt by Crawling. 



102 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



RULE VI. 

the runner to advance the ball after it has 
been declared dead. 

If a player extends his arms, pushing the 
ball ahead after it has been declared dead, 
it is crawling. 

RULE VII. 

KICK-OFF 

First and Section 1. (a) The captains of the oppos- 
third periods, ing teams shall toss up a coin before the 
game. The winner of the toss shall have 
the choice of goal or kick-off. If the win- 
ner of the toss selects the goal, the loser 
must take the kick-off. The loser of the 
toss shall have the same privileges at the 
beginning of the third period as the winner 
of the toss had at the beginning of the 
game. 
Second and (&) At the beginning of the second and 
fourth periods, fourth periods the teams shall change goals, 
the possession of the ball, the down, the 
relative spot of the down, and the distance 
to be gained to remain the same as at the 
termination of the preceding period. 
After scoring. (c) The teams shall not change goals after 
a try-at-goal following a touchdown, nor 
after a goal from the field, but the side 
just scored upon shall have the option of 
kicking off or having their opponents kick 
off. 
Ball kicked Section 2. At kick-off, if the ball is kicked 
across goal line, across the goal line and is there declared 
dead when in the possession of one of the 
side defending the goal, it is a touchback. 
If the ball is not declared dead, the side 
defending the goal may run with it or kick 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 103 

RULE VII. 

it exactly as if it had not crossed the goal 
line. 

If it is declared dead in possession of one 
of the attacking side, provided that the 
man was on-side, it is a touchdown. 

RULE VIII. 

POSITION OF PLAYERS AT KICK-OFF. 

Section 1. The side having the kick-off Point of 
shall kick-off from its own 40-yard line at a Kick-off. 
point equidistant from the side lines. 

Section 2. The kicker's side shall be Kicker's side. 
behind the ball when it is kicked. 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

The ball shall be kicked off again from a 
point 5 yards back and directly back of the 
original mark and a new restraining line for 
the opponents shall be established 5 yards 
nearer_the goal line of the kicker's side. 

Section 3. The opponents shall be be- Opponents, 
hind a line 10 yards in front of the ball 
until the ball is kicked. 

PE N A LTY (Linesman) 

The ball shall be kicked off again from a 
point which may be 5 yards nearer oppo- 
nents' goal if the kicking side so desires, 
and a new restraining line for the opponents 
shall be established 5 yards nearer the 
opponents' goal. 

. RULE IX. 

POSITION OF PLAYERS AT SCRIMMAGE. 

Section 1. When the ball is put in play Seven players on 
by a scrimmage, at least seven players of scrimmage line, 
the side holding the ball shall be on the line 
of scrimmage. 



104 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



scrimmage line, 
when. 



RULE IX. 

Player on A player shall be considered to be on the 
line of scrimmage if he has both hands or 
both feet up to or within one foot of this 
line, or if he has one foot and the opposite 
hand up to or within one foot of it. He 
shall also stand with both feet outside the 
outside foot of the player next to him, un- 
less he be one of the two men standing on 
either side of and next to the snapper-back 
(commonly known as guards), in which 
Locking legs, case he may lock legs with the snapper- 
back. 

If a back-field man goes up on the line of 
scrimmage he must conform to the rule re- 
garding the position of his hands or feet. 



PENALTY 

Loss of 5 yards. 

See illustrations Nos. 5, 6, 
{See Rule XIX., Sec. 6a.) 



(Umpire) 



7 and 8, Pages 152, 153.) 



No player Section 2. In a scrimmage no part of any 
ahead of scrim- player shall be ahead of his line of scrim- 
mage line, mage, except the snapper-back, who, when 
snapping the ball, may have his head and 
his hands, or the foot used in snapping the 
ball, ahead of his line of scrimmage. The 
snapper-back may assume any position, so 
long as he is not off-side in putting the ball 
in play. 

The position on the line of the men in the 
scrimmage is governed by the pictures in 
the back of the book. 

P E N A LT Y (Linesman) 

If any player (with the above privilege to 
snapper-back excepted) is ahead of his Cine 
—Loss of 5 yards. 

(See illustration No. U, Page 152.) 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 105 

RULE IX. 

Section 3. No player of those ordinarily Center, Guards 
occupying the position of center, guard, or and Tackles, 
tackle— that is, the five middle players of 
the line— may drop back from the line of 
scrimmage on the offense unless he is at 
least 5 yards back of the line of scrimmage 
when the ball is put in play and another 
player of those ordinarily behind the line of 
scrimmage takes his place on the line of 
scrimmage. 

The playing of a so-called center, guard 
or tackle on defense, as an end or back on 
offense, or any other shifting of men in 
attempted evasion of this rule, is construed 
to be within the prohibition. Otherwise, so 
far as the defense is concerned, the captain 
is not restrained in placing his men. If a 
captain desires to shift the center, guard or 
tackle into the back-field, he may do so on 
speaking to the Referee. But the player so 
shifted shall not again return to one of these 
middle line positions. Any one of these men 
may, however, be taken five yards back with- 
out consulting the Referee and may return 
again to his position. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

Loss of 5 yards. 

Section 4. At the moment when the ball One player 
is put in play in a scrimmage, no player of in motion, 
the side which has the ball shall be in mo- 
tion, except that one man of the side hav- 
ing the ball may be in motion either directly 
or obliquely towards his own goal line or 
line extended. If the end is the man in 
motion another player must take his place 



106 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE IX. 

on the line of scrimmage, as seven men 
must be on this line when the ball is put 
in play. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

Loss of 5 yards. 

RULE X. 

POSITION OF PLAYERS AT KICK-OUT. 

Kicker. Section 1. The ball shall be kicked out 
from some point inside the kicker's 20-yard 
line. 
Player with ball Section 2. After the Referee blows his 
not to cross line, whistle signifying that play may start, no 
player of the kicking side shall advance 
beyond the 20-yard line with the ball in his 
possession. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

The ball shall be kicked out from some 
point 5 yards back of the original restrain- 
ing line and a new restraining line for the 
opponents shall be established 5 yards 
nearer the goal line of the kicker's side. 

Ball not to Section 3. After the Referee blows his 
touch ground, whistle signifying that play may start, no 
player of the kicking side shall allow the 
ball to touch the ground in the field of play 
without immediately thereafter putting it 
in play by kicking it. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

Same as under Section 2. 

Kicker's side. Section 4. The kicker's side shall be 
behind the ball when it is kicked. 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

Same as under Section 2. 

Opponents. Section 5. After the Referee blows his 
whistle signifying that play may start, the 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 107 

RULE X. 

opponents shall be on the kicking side's 
20-yard line or nearer their own goal until : 

(a) The ball is kicked; or, 

(6) The ball touches the ground within 
the field of play (either by accident or 
otherwise); or, 

(c) A player of the kicking side advances 
beyond his restraining line with the ball in 
his possession. 

PENALTY (Linesman) 

The bail shall be kicked out from some 
point 5 yards ahead of the original restrain- 
ing line and a new restraining line for the 
opponents shall be established 5 yards 
nearer their own goal. 

RULE XL 

POSITION OF PLAYERS AT PUNT-OUT. 

Section 1. After the Referee blows his Punter, 
whistle signifying that play may start, the 
punter may not approach nearer the goal 
than the point where a line parallel to the 
side line and passing through the spot of 
the touchdown intersects the goal line. He 
shall kick the ball from a position behind 
the goal line within the angle formed by 
the goal line and the above intersecting 

line. (Referee) 

Section 2. After the Referee blows his Punter's side, 
whistle signifying that play may start, the 
punter's side shall stand in the field of 
play not less than 5 yards from the goal line 
until the ball is kicked. 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

The ball shall be punted out again and a 
new restraining line for the punter's side is 
established 5 yards nearer their own goal. 



108 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XL 

Opponents. Section 3. The opponents may line up 
anywhere on the goal line except within 
the space of 5 yards on each side of the 
punter's mark and after the Referee blows 
his whistle signifying that play may start, 
they shall not advance beyond the goal line 
or come within 5 yards of the punter's 
mark until the ball is kicked. 

P E N A LTY (Linesman) 

The ball may be punted out again and a new 
restraining line is established for the op- 
ponents 5 yards back of their original line. 

RULE XII. 

POSITION OF PLAYERS AT PLACE-KICK 
FOR GOAL AFTER TOUCHDOWN. 

Kicker. Section 1. The ball shall be held for 
the kick by another player of the kicker's 
side and no play except the try-at-goal 
shall be allowed. 

(a) In case of a place-kick preceded by a 
fair catch of a punt-out, the kick shall be 
made from the mark of the fair catch, or 
any point directly behind it. 

(6) In case of a place-kick not preceded by 
a punt-out, the kick shall be made from 
some point (to be selected by the kicker 
and by him indicated to the Referee), out- 
side the goal, on a line parallel to the side 
line and passing through the point where 
the touchdown was declared. 
Player with ball Section 2. No player of the kicking side 
not to cross line, shall advance beyond the point or line from 
which the ball is to be kicked with the ball 
in his possession. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

The ball must be kicked from some point 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 109 

RULE XII. 

5 yards directly back of the original mark 
or point. 

Section 3. The kicker's side shall be Kicker's side, 
behind the ball when it is kicked. 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

Same as under Section 2. 

Section 4. The opponents shall stand Opponents. 
on or behind the goal line until : 

(<z) The ball is kicked or the Referee 
signals with his hand that the ball has 
touched the ground; or, 

(6) A player of the kicking side advances 
beyond his restraining line with the ball in 
his possession. 

PENALTY (Linesman) 

The ball may be kicked from some point 5 
yards ahead of the original mark and a new 
restraining line for the opponents shall be 
established 5 yards back of the goal line. 

RULE XIII. 

POSITION OF PLAYERS ON FREE KICK 

AFTER FAIR CATCH (OTHER 

THAN FAIR CATCH FROM 

PUNT-OUT). 

Section 1. The ball shall be kicked by Kicker. 
a punt, drop-kick or place-kick, either from 
the mark of the catch or from some point 
directly back of it. 

Section 2. After the Referee blows his 
whistle signifying that play may start, no 
player of the kicking side shall advance Player with ball 
beyond a line passing through the mark of not to cross line, 
the catch and parallel to the goal line with 
the ball in his possession. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

The ball must be kicked from some point 
at least 5 yards back of the original mark 



HO SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XIII. 

and a new restraining line for the opponents 
shall be established 5 yards nearer the 
original mark. 

Ball not to Section 3. After the Referee blows his 
touch ground, whistle signifying that play may start, no 
player of the kicking side shall allow the 
ball to touch the ground in the field of play, 
without immediately thereafter putting it 
in play by kicking it. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

Same as under Section 2. 

Kicker's side. Section 4. The kicker's side shall be 
behind the ball when it is kicked. 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

Same as under Section 2. 

Opponents. Section 5. After the Referee blows his 
whistle signifying that play may start the 
opponents shall be behind a line 10 yards 
in front of the line passing through the 
mark of the catch and parallel to the goal 
line until : 

(a) The ball is kicked or the Referee 
signals with his hand that the ball has 
touched the ground; or, 

(b) The ball touches the ground (either 
by accident or otherwise) ; or, 

(c) A player of the kicking side ad- 
vances beyond his restraining line with the 
ball in his possession. 

PENALTY (Linesman) 

The ball may be kicked from a point 5 yards 
ahead of the original mark and a new re- 
straining line for the opponents shall be 
established 5 yards nearer their own goal. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. HI 

RULE XIV. 

NO PLAYER OUT OF BOUNDS. 

Section 1. No player may be out of Holder of ball. 
bounds at the time when the ball is put in 
play except the kicker and the holder of the 
ball in a place-kick. 

PENALTY (Umpibe) 

For first violation the ball is brought back 
and played over. 

For further violations during the same 
scrimmage— Loss of 5 yards for each viola- 
tion. 

RULE XV. 

PUTTING THE BALL IN PLAY 

Section 1. The ball shall be put in play By scrimmage, 
by a scrimmage unless otherwise specific- 
ally provided. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

For first violation the ball is brought back 
and played over. For further violations dur- 
ing the same scrimmage— 5 yards for 
each violation. 

Section 2. After a fair catch the ball After fair catch, 
may be put in play by any player of the side 
making the fair catch, by either a punt, 
drop-kick, place-kick or scrimmage. 

Section 3. If a foul is declared the ball After a foul, 
shall not be put in play again until penalty 
has either been enforced or declined. 

Section 4. Any player of the side which Player first 
puts the ball in play (except either of the receiving ball 
men standing on the line of scrimmage on from snapper- 
each side of the snapper-back), who first back, 
receives the ball when it is put in play, 
may carry the ball-forward beyond the line 
of scrimmage. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

For guard carrying the ball— 5 yards. 



112 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XV. 

Feint to snap Section 5. If, after the snapper-back has 
the ball, taken his position, he voluntarily moves the 
ball as if to snap it, so as to draw the oppo- 
nents off-side (whether he withholds it 
altogether or only momentarily), it shall 
not be considered as in play, or the scrim- 
mage as begun. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

Loss of 5 yards. 

Feints by players Section 6. If a player other than the 
of side on offense snapper-back of the side in possession of the 
other than ball makes a deliberate attempt, by a false 
snapper-back, start or otherwise, to draw the opponents 
off-side, the ball, if snapped, shall not be re- 
garded as in play or the scrimmage as begun. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

Loss of 5 yards. 

Ball kicked out Section 7. At kick-off, if the ball goes out 
of bounds at of bounds before it is touched by any player, 
kick-off. it shall be brought back and be kicked 
off again. If it is kicked out of bounds a 
second time it shall go as a kick-off to the 
opponents. If either side thus forfeits the 
ball twice, it shall go to the opponents, who 
shall put it in play by a scrimmage at the 
center of the field. 

(Kicking the ball again in case it goes out 
of bounds at kick-off or on a kick-out is not 
a penalty, and therefore may not be de- 
clined. Covers Section 8 also. ) 
After out of Section 8. If on a kick-out the ball goes 
bounds at out of bounds before striking any player, it 
kick-out. must be kicked out again and if this occurs 
twice in succession it shall be given to the 
opponents as out of bounds on the 35-yard 
line nearest to the kicker's goal line. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 113 

RULE XV. 

Section 9. If a kicked ball other than at After out of 
kick-off, or kick-out, either before or after bounds except 
touching the ground, goes out of bounds at kick-off and 
before crossing the opponents' goal line, it kick-out. 
shall belong to the opponents at the point 
where it crosses the side line. 

But if it strikes any player who is entitled 
to get it and then goes out of bounds it 
shall belong to the player who first obtains 
possession of it. 

Section 10. If the ball goes out of bounds, Walking in with 
whether it bounds back or not, a player of ball after out of 
the side which is entitled to its possession bounds, 
must bring it to the spot where the ball 
crossed the side line, and there, after de- 
claring how far he intends walking, walk 
in with it, in company with the Referee, at 
right angles to the side line, any distance 
not less than 5 nor more than 15 yards, and 
at a point indicated by the Referee put it 
down for a scrimmage. (referee) 

Section 11. If the player attempting to Two steps after 
make a fair catch takes more than two fair catch, 
steps after catching the ball, his side must 
put the ball in play by a scrimmage at a 
point 5 yards back of the mark of the catch, 
to be counted first down with 10 yards to 
gain. (But see Rule XV., Section 14.) 

(Umpire) 

Section 12. If in case of a try-at-goal Ball touching 
after a touchdown the ball is not kicked ground at 
after having been allowed to touch the try-at-goal to go 
ground once, no second attempt shall be as a kick-off. 
permitted and the ball shall be put in play 
by a kick-off. 



114 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XV. 

After try-at-goal Section 13. After the try - at - goal, 
ball to go as a whether the goal be made or missed, the 
kick-off. ball shall be put in play by a kick-off. 

On failure of g ECTI0N 14. if a f a i r catc h is not made 
rair catch at on t j ie g rst attempt on a punt-out, the ball 
punt-out ball to ghaU be put in play by a k i ck . off> 
go as a kick-oft. 

After touchback Section 15. After a touchback or a 
or safety, safety, the side making the touchback or 
the safety shall at its own option put the 
ball in play either by a kick-out or by a 
scrimmage from first down on its own 20- 
yard line. (Referee) 

RULE XVI. 

DELAY OF GAME. 

Time taken out. Section 1. Time shall be taken out while 
the ball is being brought out for a try-at- 
goal, punt-out, kick-out, or kick-off; after 
a fair catch has been made ; during enforce- 
ment of all penalties; when the ball goes out 
of bounds or when play is for any reason 
suspended by the Referee. Time shall begin 
again when the ball is actually put in play. 

(Referee, Linesman) 

By request of Section 2. Either captain may ask that 
Captains, time be called three times during each half 
(the first half consisting of the first and 
second periods, and the second half of the 
third and fourth periods), without penalty. 
If thereafter, however, time is taken out 
at the request of a captain, his side shall 
be penalized by a loss of two yards for 
each time (unless a player be removed 
from the game), the number of the down 
and the point to be gained remaining the 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 115 

RULE XVI. 

same as they were before the request 
was made. 

The Referee, however, may suspend play By order of 
at any time at his own discretion without Referee, 
penalty to either side. 

Section 3. No delay arising from any Length of delay. 
cause whatsoever shall continue more than 
two minutes. 

PENALTY (Referee, Linesman) 

Unreasonable delay on the part of side 
not in possession of ball— 5 yards and the 
scrimmage following. to be counted as first 
down. 

Unreasonable delay on the part of side in 
possession of the ball— 5 yards, the down 
and the point to be gained for the first down 
remaining the same as they were at the 
beginning of the scrimmage during which 
the delay occurred. 

Refusal of either side to play within two 
minutes after having been ordered to do so 
by the Referee— forfeiture of the game. 

RULE XVII. 

UNLAWFUL INTERFERENCE WITH PLAY. 

Section 1. Before the ball is put in play Interference 
the opponents must not interfere in any with snapper- 
way with the snapper-back, nor touch him back or ball, 
or the ball. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

Loss of 5 yards. 

Section 2. Before the ball is put in play Interference 
no player shall lay his hands upon or with opponents, 
interfere with an opponent in such a way 
as to delay putting the ball in play. 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

Loss of 5 yards. 



116 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XVII. 

Interference Section 3. When a player has an oppor- 
with opportunity tunity for making a fair catch, opponents 
for making fair who are off-side shall not in any way inter- 
catch, fere with him or with the ball. 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

Loss of 15 yards and offended side to have 
fair catch whether ball be caught or not. 

(It must be borne in mind that a player 
running toward a ' ' fly-ball ' f has the right 
of way and if opponents are off-side they 
must get out of his way or otherwise they 
may interfere with his opportunity for 
making a fair catch. ) 

Maker of fair Section 4. No player shall be thrown to 
catch not to be the ground after he has made a fair catch. 

thrown. PENALTY (Umpire) 

Loss of 15 yards. 

Signal for fair Section 5. In case a signal for a fair 

catch protects catch is made by any player who has an 

only the player opportunity for a fair catch, and another 

signaling, player of his side (who has not signaled for 

a fair catch) catches the ball, no run shall be 

made, nor shall the fair catch be allowed, 

but the ball shall be given to the catcher's 

side for a scrimmage at the point where the 

catch was made. (umpire) 

Interlocked Section 6. No player of the side in pos- 
interference. session of the ball shall use his hands, arms 
or body, to push, pull or hold upon his feet 
the player carrying the ball, nor shall there 
be any interlocked interference. By inter- 
locked interference is meant the grasping 
of one another by, or encircling the body to 
any degree with, the hands or arms by the 
players of the side in possession of the ball. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



117 



RULE XVII. 

The runner with the ball may place his 
hand on a team mate, but may not grasp 
him so as to be pulled by him. The side in 
possession of the ball may push their oppo- 
nents with their bodies. A player may not 
lift a fallen runner to his feet in order to 
enable him to continue his run. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

Loss of 15 yards. 

RULE XVIII. 

OBSTRUCTIONS OF OPPONENTS BY USE 

OF HANDS AND ARMS AFTER THE 

BALL IS PUT IN PLAY. 

Section 1. After the ball has been put 
in play: 

(a) The player carrying the ball may 
ward off opponents with his hands and 
arms, but no other player of the side in 
possession of the ball shall hold or use his 
hands or arms (except with the arms close 
to the body) to obstruct an opponent. This 
prohibition includes: 

(1) Grasping an opponent with the hands 
or arms. 

(2) Placing the hands upon an opponent 
to push him away from a play. 

(3) Encircling in any degree any part of 
an opponent with the arm. 

(4) Using the arms in any way to lift an 
opponent in blocking. 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

Loss of 15 yards. 

(6) Players of the side not in possession 
of the ball may use their hands and arms to not in possession 
get at the ball or the player carrying it, but of ball. 



Use of hands 
and arms by side 
in possession 
of ball. 



Use of hands 
and arms by side 



118 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XVIII. 

shall not tackle or in any other way hold 
their opponents except in an actual attempt 
to get at or tackle the player who is carry- 
ing the ball. 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

Loss of 5 yards. 

NOTE. —If a violation of this rule is com- 
mitted when neither side is in possession of 
the ball, the ball shall go to the offended side 
as first down at the point of the foul. 

Kicking. Section 2. If the side in possession of 
the ball kicks: 

Use of hands (a) Players of said side who have crossed 

by side kicking the line of scrimmage may use their hands 

the ball, and arms to push opponents out of the way 

in order to get at the ball or the player 

carrying it. 

Use of hands (b) Players of the side which did not put 

by defensive the ball in play may use (1) their hands and 

side in case of arms to push opponents out of the way in 

a kick, order to get at the ball and (2) their bodies 

or their arms close to the body in order to 

obstruct opponents who are going down the 

field from getting at a player of their own 

side who is endeavoring to get at the ball 

or who is carrying it. 

PENALTIES-Same as Section 1. 

Forward Section 3. If the side in possession of 
passing, the ball makes a forward pass: 

Use of hands (a) No player of the said side who has 

by passing side, crossed the line of scrimmage shall in any 

manner interfere with an opponent until 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 119 

RULE XVIII. 

the ball has been touched, except in an 
actual attempt to catch said pass himself. 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

If such offense occurs before a "fourth 
down" has been declared (i. e., if it occurs 
during a play following either a first, second 
or third down) the offending side shall put 
the ball in play at the spot of the preceding 
down, and the play shall count as a down. 
The point to be gained shall remain the 
same. 

If f however, such offense occurs after a 
fourth down has been declared (i. e., if it 
occurs during a play following a fourth 
down) the ball shall go to the opponents 
at the spot of the preceding down. 

(6) No player of the side which did not Use of hands 
put the ball in play shall in any manner in- by defensive 
terfere with an opponent who has crossed side in case of 
the line of scrimmage until the ball has a forward pass, 
been touched, except in an actual attempt 
to catch the ball himself. 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

Loss of 10 yards from point where ball 
was put in play and first down to ensue. 

If a team makes a forward pass the ball is 
considered to he still in its possession unless 
and until the pass has been declared incom- 
pleted or has been recovered by the opponents 
and violations of this Section are to be judged 
solely under the provisions of Rule XIX. 

RULE XIX. 

PASSING OR THROWING THE BALL. 

Section 1. Any player may, at any time, Backward paw. 
pass or throw the ball in any direction ex- 
cept toward his opponents' goal. A back- 
ward pass by the snapper-back on the first, 



120 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XIX. 

second or third down, that goes out of 

bounds before touching a player of either 

side, shall belong (at the point where the 

ball crossed the side line) to the side first 

recovering it ; if on the fourth down, the 

ball shall go to the opponents at the point 

where it went out of bounds. 

Forward pass Section 2. The ball may not be passed 

by side not put- or thrown toward the opponents' goal by a 

ting ball in play, player of the side that did not put the ball 

in play from a scrimmage. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

If such illegal forward pass is made, the of- 
fending side shall put the ball in play by a 
scrimmage at a point 15 yards directly back 
of the spot from which the pass was made. 
The ensuing down shall be the first down, 
with 10 yards to gain. 

Section 3. A player of the side which put 
the ball in play from a scrimmage may pass 
or throw the ball any distance toward the 
opponents' goal under the following restric- 
tions : 

(a) The pass must be made from a point 
at least 5 yards back of the scrimmage line. 

PENALTY (REFEREE) 

If such offense occurs before a"fourth down" 
has been declared (i.e., if it occurs during a 
play following either a first, second or third 
down) the offending side shall put the ball 
in play at the spot of the preceding down 
and the play shall count as a down. The 
point to be gained shall remain the same. 

If, however, such offense occurs after a 
fourth down has been declared (i. e., if it 
occurs during a play following a fourth 
down), the ball shall go to the opponents 
at the spot of the preceding down. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 121 

RULE XIX. 

(6) Only one forward pass may be made Second forward 
in each scrimmage. pass illegal. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

The same as stated under Section 3 (a). 

Section 4. If the ball, after having Forward pass 
been legally passed forward, strikes the striking ground, 
ground within the field of play, either before 
or after having been touched by a player of 
either side, the pass shall not be considered 
as completed. 

PENALTY (Umpire, Referee) 

For such uncompleted pass the same as 
under Section 3 (a). 

Section 5. If the ball, after having been Forward pass 
legally passed forward, strikes the uprights crossing end 
or cross-bar, before or after it has been line, striking goal 
touched by any legal player and before it or in end zone, 
has touched the ground, or if it strikes the 
ground inside the end zone or any obstruc- 
tion or spectator in the end zone, or if it 
crosses the end line or side line extended, 
it becomes dead and shall count as a touch- 
back to the defenders of the goal. 

Section 6. (a) After the ball has been Players who 
legally passed forward, it may first be may receive 
touched only by such players of the passer's forward pass, 
side as were at the time the ball was put in 
play at least 1 yard behind the line of 
scrimmage or were playing at either end 
of the said line. 

If a player of the passer's side so legally 
touches the ball, he only of his side may 
recover or attempt to secure possession of 
the ball until it touches, the ground or is 
touched by an opponent. 



122 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XIX. 

Forward pass If a forward pass is touched by any 
touched by player of the passer's side who is ineligible 
ineligible player. to receive it, the pass shall not be considered 
as completed. 

PENALTY (Umpire) 

If any ineligible player of the passer's side 
touches the ball, it shall go to the oppon- 
ents at the spot of the preceding down, 
unless the foul occurred between the op- 
ponents' 10-yard line and their end line, 
in which case the bail shall go as a touch- 
back to the offended side. 

(b) Any player of the side that did not 
make the forward pass has full right to 
touch and to attempt to secure possession 
of the ball until it has touched the ground. 

(c) When the ball has been legally passed 
forward and has been touched by any player 
of the side not making the pass, any player 
of either side has the right to attempt to 
secure possession of the ball until it has 
touched the ground. 

Forward pass Section 7. If the ball, after having 

out of bound*, been legally passed forward, goes out of 

bounds before it touches the ground, it 

shall belong to the opponents at the point 

where the ball crossed the side line. 

(Umpire, Linesman) 

Batting the ball. Section 8. A player may at any time bat 
the ball in any direction except toward his 
opponents' goal. 

PENALTY (Umpire, Referee.) 

Loss of ball to the offended side on the 
spot where the foul occurred. 

NOT E. — Exception. In case of a ball in 
the air from a forward pass, any eligible 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 123 

RULE XIX. 

player of either side may bat the ball in any 
direction, to prevent an opponent from 
securing it. 

RULE XX. 

OFF-SIDE AND ON-SIDE. 

Section 1. A player is put off-side if the Off-side, 
ball in play has last been touched by one of 
his own side behind him. No player, how- 
ever, may be called off-side behind his own 
goal line, nor when holding the ball for a 
place-kick after a fair catch or touchdown. 

Section 2. A player may at all times re- When off-side 
ceive the ball from another of his own side player may 
who is in front of him, and any player may touch ball, 
recover the ball on a fumble or a muff, but 
in no other instance shall a player when off- 
side touch the ball. [Apparent violations of 
the off-side rule by players attempting either 
legally or illegally to receive a forward pass 
are to be judged solely under the provisions 
of Rule XIX.] 

' PENALTY (Umpire) 

When an off-side player within his oppo- 
nents' 10 -yard line is touched by a ball kicked 
by one of his own side — Touchback for de- 
fenders of goal. 

In all other cases— ball to go to the oppo- 
nents on the spot where the foul occurred. 

Section 3. Any player being off-side is When ball 
put on-side when the ball has touched an touches oppo- 
opponent. nent - 

Section 4. The player who, standing back Kicker though 
of his own line of scrimmage, receives the on-side may 
ball from one of his own side and then kicks not recover 
it beyond the line of scrimmage may not ball. 



124 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XX. 

himself get the ball until after it has touched 
one of his opponents. 

PENALTY (Umpire, Referee) 

Loss of ball to opponents at spot where 
foul occurred. 

RULE XXI. 

NECESSARY GAIN ON DOWNS. 

10 yards in Section 1. If in four consecutive downs 
4 downs. a team having constantly had the ball in 
its possession, shall not have advanced the 
ball 10 yards, it shall go to the opponents 
on the spot of the fifth down, except as 
provided in Section 2. 

Continuity of Section 2. The ball shall not be con- 
downs broken, sidered as having been ' ' constantly in 
possession": 

(a) When the ball, after having passed 
into the actual possession and control of the 
other side is recovered before it is declared 
dead by the Referee; 

(6) When the ball has been kicked and the 
opponents given a fair and equal chance of 
gaining possession of it. (No kick shall be 
regarded as having given the opponents 
such chance unless it shall have crossed 
the line of scrimmage or shall have been 
touched by an opponent. ) 

Position of Section 3. The forward point of the ball in 
ball in measur- its position when declared dead shall be 
ing. taken as the determining point in measur- 
ing; the Referee shall not rotate the ball 
before measuring its forward point. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 125 

RULE XXII. 

NECESSARY DISTANCE ON KICK. 

Section 1. In the case of a kick-off, kick- 1 yards 
out or kick from a fair catch, the ball must on kick, 
be kicked a distance of at least 10 yards 
toward the opponents' goal line, from the 
line restraining the player making the kick, 
unless it is touched by an opponent ; other- 
wise the ball is not in play. 

Section 2. A kick other than a kick r off, 
kick-out, a free kick or return kick must 
be made from a point at least 5 yards be- 
hind the line of scrimmage. 

(Referee) 

PENALTY (For Violation of Section 2). 

If such offense occurs before a fourth down 
has been declared, the offending side shall 
put the ball in play at the spot of the pre- 
ceding down and the play shall count as a 
down. The point to be gained shall remain 
the same. 

If, however, such offense occurs after a 
fourth down has been declared, the bal? 
shall go to the opponents at the spot of 
the preceding down. 

RULE XXIIL 

TRY AT GOAL. 

Section 1. A side which has made a Place-kick, 
touchdown shall try at goal by a place-kick, 
either direct or preceded by a punt-out. 

RULE XXIV. 

CONDUCT OF PLAYERS. 

Section 1. There shall be no striking Striking, 
with the fist or elbows, kneeing, kicking, kneeing, 
meeting with the knee, striking with kicking, 
the locked hands by line men when they 



126 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XXIV 

are breaking through; nor shall a player on 
defense strike in the face with the heel of 
the hand the opponent who is carrying 

tne ball. /Referee, umpire, \ 

PENALTY ^ Linesman. / 

For violation of any part of Section 1— Dis- 
qualification and loss by offending team of 
one-half the distance to its own goal line. 
(See illustrations Nos. 28 and 29, Page 158.) 

Running into, Section 2. There shall be no running into 
" roughing the or otherwise roughly treating the player 
full-back." kicking the ball as described in Rule XX. , 
Section 4. 

B -. IAIT w /Referee, Umpire, \ 

PENALTY ^ Linesman ) 

Disqualification. 

(As by virtue of the prohibition of Rule 
XX. , Section 4, the kicker can neither put 
players on-side nor himself get the ball, 
there is no excuse for running into or other- 
wise roughly treating him, and consequently 
officials should punish such offenses by dis- 
qualification. ) 

Piling up. Section 3. There shall be no piling up on 
the player after the Referee has declared 
the ball dead. 

PENALTY /Referee, Umpire, \ 

Loss of 15 yards. V Linesman ) 

Hurdling. Section 4. There shall be no hurdling. 

PENALTY (Referee) 

Loss of 15 yards. 

Tripping, Section 5. There shall be no tripping,. 

tackling out of tackling the runner when clearly out of 

bounds, bounds, or any other acts of unnecessary 

unnecessary roughness. (The throwing to the ground 

roughness, of the player with the ball after it has been 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 127 

RULE XXIV. 

declared dead may be deemed unnecessary- 
roughness. ) 

PPM A l XY /Referee, Umpire A 

,■;-«- ^ V Linesman ) 

Loss of 15 yards. 

Section 6. There shall be no crawling Crawling, 
by the man in possession of the ball. 

PENALTY (Referee, Umpire) 

Loss of 5 yards. 

Section 7. There shall be no unsports- Unsportsman- 
manlike conduct on the part of the players, like conduct. 
This shall include the use of abusive or in- Abusive 
suiting language to opponents or officials, language. 
Concealing the ball beneath the clothing or 
substituting any article for the ball shall be 
deemed unsportsmanlike conduct. 

/Referee, Umpire. \ 

PENALTY I Linesman ) 

Suspension for tho remainder of the game. 

Section 8. (a) A player when tackling Flying tackle, 
an opponent must have one foot at least on 
the ground. 

(6) There shall be no tackling below the Tackling below 
knees, except by the men on the line of the knees, 
scrimmage on the defense, and of these, 
the two men occupying the positions on the 
ends of the line of scrimmage may not 
tackle below the knees. 

(Referee, Umpire, \ 
Linesman ; 
Loss of 5 yards from spot where foul oc- 
curred. 

(See illustration No. SO, Page 158.) 

Section 9. If a team on defense commits Playing for 
fouls so near its own goal, that these fouls penalties to 
are punishable only by the halving of the delay game, 
distance to the line (the object being, in 
the opinion of the Referee, to delay the 



128 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XXIV. 

game) it shall be regarded as refusing to 
allow the game to proceed. The Referee 
shall in such case warn the offending side 
once, and if the offense is repeated, he 
shall declare the game forfeited to the 
opponents. 
Unfair play. Section 10. In case the play is interfered 
with by some act palpably unfair and not 
elsewhere provided for in these rules, either 
the Referee or Umpire shall have the 
power to award 5 yards to the offended 
side, the number of the down and the point 
to be gained being determined as provided 
in Rule XXVI. 

RULE XXV. 

CONDUCT OF PERSONS OTHER THAN 
PLAYERS. 

Side line Section 1. There shall be no coaching, 
coaching, either by substitutes or by any other per- 
son not participating in the game. 

NOTE. — The Committee would point out 
that every effort should be made to prevent 
this, as the practice is not in the best inter- 
est OJ the Sport. /Referee, Umpire, \ 
PENALTY V Linesman ) 
Loss of 15 yards by the side for whose sup- 
posed benefit the offense was committed, 
the point to be gained and number of 
down to remain unchanged. 

If the ball was dead when the offense oc- 
curred the penalty will be enforced from 
that spot. 

If the ball was in play when the offense 
occurred the penalty will be enforced from 
the spot where the ball was put in play. 

The offender shall be excluded from the 
neighborhood of the field of play for the 
remainder of the game. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FC JT BALL GUIDE. 129 

RULE XXV. 

Section 2. In case of accident to a player, Attendance on 
one representative of the player's team injured player, 
may, if he has first obtained the consent 
of the Referee or Umpire, come upon the 
field of play to attend to the injured player. 
This representative need not always be the 
same person. (Referee, umpire) 

Section 3. No person other than the Person* allowed 
players, the officials, the representatives on field of play. 
above mentioned in Section 2, or an in- 
coming substitute, shall at any time come 
upon the field of play without permission 
of the Referee or Umpire. 

PENALTY (Referee, Umpire) 

Loss of 15 yards by the side whose man 
committed the offense, the point to be 
gained and the number of down to remain 
unchanged. 

The spot from which the penalty shall be 
enforced will bedetermined as under penalty 
for breach of Section 1 . 

Section 4. Only one man shall be al- Persons allowed 
lowed to walk up and down on each side of to walk up and 
the field. The rest, including substitutes, down on side 
water carriers, and all who are admitted lines, 
within the enclosure, must be seated 
throughout the game. 

PENALTY (Referee, Umpire) 

Loss of 15 yards by the side whose man 
committed the offense; the point to be 
gained and the number of the down to re- 
main unchanged. 

The spot from which the penalty shall be 
enforced will be determined as under penalty 
for breach of Section 1. 



130 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XXVI. 

ENFORCEMENT OF PENALTIES. 

(governing all cases not otherwise 

Specifically Provided For.) 

Spot from Section 1. Penalties for fouls commit- 
which enforced, ted by players shall be enforced from the 
spot where the foul was committed. 

Penalties for fouls committed by persons 
other than players will be enforced as speci- 
fically provided under Rule XXV. 

Ball after dis- Section 2. If a foul is committed by the 

tance penalty not side which put the ball in play, and the dis- 

in advance of tance penalty does not leave the ball in 

point necessary advance of the point necessary for first 

for first down in down when the ball was last put in play, 

previous play, the down and point to be gained for first 

down shall remain the same as they were 

at the beginning of the scrimmage during 

which the foul occurred. 

Ball after Section 3. If a foul is committed by the 

distance penalty side which put the ball in play, after a gain 

in advance of of such a length that the distance penalty 

point necessary leaves the ball in advance of the point 

for first down necessary for first down when the ball was 

in previous play, last put in play, the ensuing down shall be 

counted first down with 10 yards to gain. 

First down Section 4. If a f oul is committed by the 

when offending side which did not put the ball in play, the 

side not in pos- scrimmage after a distance penalty shall be 

session of ball, counted as first down with 10 yards to gain. 

First down Section 5. If a foul is committed by a 

when neither player when neither side is in possession of 

side in posses- the ball, the ball shall go to the offended 

sion of ball, side as first down at the point of the foul. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 131 

RULE XXVI. 

Section 6. If a foul is committed out- Distance penalty 
side the 1-yard line, and the distance carrying ball 
penalty, if enforced, would carry the ball inside 1 -yard 
across the goal line, or inside the 1-yard line or across 
line, the ball shall be down on the 1-yard goal line, 
line. 

Section 7. If a foul is committed within Foul within 
the 1-yard line and the distance penalty, if 1 -yard line, 
enforced, would carry the ball across the 
goal line, one-half the remaining distance 
to the goal line shall be given. 

Section 8. In case an official signals a Both sides 
foul against one side and an official sig- penalized on 
nals a foul against the other side on the same play, 
same play (the penalties being other than 
disqualification), the ball shall be brought 
back to the point where it was put in play 
and be played over again, the number of 
the down and the point to be gained for 
first down remaining the same. . 

Section 9. In case officials signal dif- More than one 
ferent fouls against the same side during official penaliz- 
the same play, only one penalty shall be ing same side on 
inflicted, but the offended side shall have same play, 
the right to elect which of the fouls shall 
be penalized. 

Section 10. In case of disqualification by Disqualification 
any official, the disqualification may not be always enforced, 
declined by the offended side, nor may the 
distance penalty accompanying it be offset 
by a foul by the other side, unless such 
foul is also punishable by disqualification. 

Section 11. Penalties for all fouls (except Refusal of 
for penalties under Rule XIX.) may be penalties. 



132 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XXVI. 

declined by the offended side, in which 
case the play shall proceed exactly as if no 
foul had been committed. In case of dif- 
ferent fouls against the same side during 
the same play, as in Section 10, one being an 
infraction of the forward pass rule, the 
offended side shall have the right to decline 
the forward pass penalty and elect the other 
penalty. A penalty which includes dis- 
qualification may be declined, but the dis- 
qualified player must leave the game. 

RULE XXVII. 

Section 1. The officials of the game shall 
be a Referee, an Umpire and a Linesman. 

It is the opinion of the Rules Committee 
that it is contrary to the best interests of 
the game fop teams to dispense with the 
services of any one of the three officials 
provided for under the rules. 

RULE XXVIII. 

DUTIES OF THE REFEREE. 

Section 1. The Referee shall have general 
oversight and control of the game. He 
shall be sole authority for the score and 
sole judge of forfeiture of the game under 
the rules. (The Referee should usually take 
his position behind the side having posses- 
sion of the ball. ) 

Section 2. The decision of the Referee 
upon all matters not specifically designated 
under the duties of other officials shall be 
final. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XXVIII. 

Section 3. In making his decisions the 
Referee must recognize and allow prece- 
dence to any penalty declared by the 
Umpire. 

Section 4. The Referee may appeal to 
either of the other officials for testimony 
upon points within his jurisdiction. 

Section 5. He must report to the Um- 
pire any infringement of certain indicated 
sections of Rule XVIII. , Rule XXIV., and 
Rule XXV. , as well as all cases of holding 
or unlawful use of hands or arms which 
come under his observation. In the event 
of the ball being kicked into a player of the 
kicker's side, he shall report the fact to the 
Umpire. 

Section 6. It is the special province of 
the Referee to see that the ball is properly 
put in play, and, except as otherwise pro- 
vided, he shall be sole judge of its position 
and progress. 

Section 7. At every kick-off and in every 
case when time has been taken out, the 
Referee shall, before ordering play to 
begin, 

(a) Ascertain from each captain that his 
team is ready; and, 

(b) Make sure that the other officials are 
ready. 

Section 8. The Referee shall be respon- 
sible for the enforcement of the following 
rules : 



134 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XXVI If. 

BRIEF OF RULES. 

(WHERE REFEREE HAS JURISDICTION.) 

Rule I. — Field. 

Section 1 — Dimensions. 
Section 2— Marking. 
Section 3 — Goal. 

Rule II. — Ball 

Rule III. — Players and Substitutes. 
i Section 1 — Number of Players. 
Section 2— Substitutes. 

Rule IV. — Length of Game. 

Section 1 — Length of periods. 
Section 2 — Darkness. 
Section 3 — Intermission. 
Section 4— Time extended. 

Rule V. — Scoring. 

Rule VI. — Definitions. 

Section 1— Methods of kicking the ball. 

Section 2— Snapping the ball. 

Section 3— Scrimmage. 

Section 5— Fair catch. 

Section 6— Goal from Touchdown. 

Section 7— Goal from the Field. 

Section 9— Out of bounds. 

Section 10— Tripping. 

Section 11— Hurdling. 

Section 12 — A down occurs. 

Section 13 — The ball is dead. 

Section 14 — Touchdown. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 135 

RULE XXVIII. 

Section 15— Touchback. 
Section 16 — Safety. 
Section 17— Crawling. 

Rule VII. — Kick- Off. 

Section 1 — Team entitled to kick-off. 
Section 2— Ball crossing goal line. 

Eule VIII. —-Position of Players at Kick-off. 
Section 1— Point of kick-off. 

Rule IX. — Position of Players at Scrimmage. 
Section 3— Five center men to be on line. 
Section 4— One player in motion. 

Rule X. — Position of Players at Kick-out. 
Section 1 — Kicker. 
Section 2— No player in possession of the ball 

to cross restraining line. 
Section 3— Ball not to touch ground. 

Rule XI. — Position of Players at Punt-out. 
Section 1 — Punter. 

Rule XII. — Position of Players at Place-kick fob 
Goal After Touchdown. 

Section 1— Kicker. 

Section 2 — No player in possession of the ball 
to cross restraining line. 

Rule XIII. — Position of Players on Free-kick After 
Fair Catch (Other Than Fair Catch 
From Punt-out). 
Section 1— Kicker. 
Section 2 — No player in possession of the ball 

to cross restraining line. 
Section 3 — Ball not to touch ground. 



136 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XXVIII. 

Rule XV. — Putting the Ball in Play. 

Section 1 — By scrimmage. 

Section 2— After fair catch. 

Section 3— After a foul. 

Section 4— Guard running with ball. 

Section 5— Feint to snap the ball. 

Section 6— Feints by players of side on offense 
other than snapper-back. 

Section 7— " Out of bounds" on kick-off. 

Section 8— ' ' Out of bounds" on kick-out. 

Section 9 — "Out of bounds" on kick from 
scrimmage. 

Section 10— Walking in with ball after "out of 
bounds." 

Section 12 — If ball touches ground in try-at- 
goal. 

Section 13 — After try -at -goal, ball must be 
kicked-off. 

Section 14 — On failure of fair catch at punt- 
out ball must be kicked-off. 

Section 15— Option after touchback or safety. 

Eule XVI. — Delay of Game. 

Section 1 — Time taken out, when. 

Section 2 — Time taken out by request of cap- 
tains. 
Time taken out by order of Referee. 

Section 3 — No delay more than two minutes. 

Eule XVII. — Unlawful Interference With Play. 
Section 1— Interference with snapper-back or 

ball. 
Section 6— Pushing, pulling, interlocked in- 
terference. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 137 

RULE XXVIII. 

Rule XVIII. — Obstruction of Opponent Afteb Ball 
Is In Play. 

(The Referee shall report to the Umpire any 
infractions of this rule which come under his 
observation. ) 

Rule XIX. — Passing or Throwing the Ball. 
Section 1 — Backward pass. 
Section 2 — Forward pass by side not putting 

the ball in play. 
Section 3 — Illegal forward passes : 
Section 4— Forward pass striking ground. 
Section 5 — Forward pass crossing end line, etc. 
Section 6 — Players who may receive a forward 

pass. 
Section 9— Batting the ball. 

Rule XX.— Off-side and On-side. 

Section 4— Kicker may not recover ball, etc. 

Rule XXI. — Necessary Gain on Downs. 

Section 1 — 10 yards in four downs. 
Section 2 — Continuity of downs broken. 
Section 3 — Position of ball in measuring. 

Rule XXII. — Necessary Distance on a Kick. 
Section 1 — On kick-off, kick-out, etc. 
Section 2 — During scrimmage from point 
5 yards back. 

Bulk XXIII.— Try-at-Goal. 

Rule XXIV. — Conduct of Players. 
Section 4— Hurdling. 
Section 9— Play for penalties to delay game. 



138 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XXVIII. 

The Referee shall report to the Umpire infrac- 
tions of the following : 
Section 1 — Striking, kneeing, kicking, etc. 
Section 2— ' 'Roughing the full-back. ' ■ 
Section 3— Piling up. 
Section 5— Tripping, tackling out of bounds, 

etc. 
Section 6 — Crawling. 
Section 7— Unsportsmanlike conduct. 
Section 8— Illegal tackling. 
The Referee shall have concurrent jurisdiction 
with the umpire over : 
Section 10 — Unfair play. 

Rule XXV. — Conduct of Persons Other Than 
Players. 
Section 2 —Attendance on an injured player. 

The Referee shall report to the Umpire infrac- 
tions of the following : 
Section 1 — Coaching from the side lines. 
Section 3— Persons allowed on field of play. 
Section 4— Persons allowed to walk along side 
lines. 

Rule XX VI.— Enforcement of Penalties. 

RULE XXIX. 

DUTIES OF THE UMPIRE. 

Section 1. The Umpire shall be judge of 
the conduct and position of the players, 
and his decision shall be final regarding 
such fouls as are not specifically placed 
within the jurisdiction of the Referee or 
the Linesman. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 139 

RULE XXIX. 

Section 2. The Umpire shall assist the 
Referee in decisions involving possession of 
the ball and interference in connection with 
the catching, securing, or possession of the 
ball when it has been kicked or passed 
down the field. 

Section 3. The Umpire shall signal all 
fouls with a horn, but the play shall con- 
tinue until the ball is declared dead by 
the Referee. 

Section 4. When the Umpire has signalled 
a foul (or when another official has reported 
a foul to him), he shall notify the Referee 
and enforce the penalty; but if the penalty 
involves loss of the ball, or the manner in 
which, or the point where the ball shall be 
put in play, he shall announce the penalty 
and indicate to the Referee the spot where 
the foul was committed, whereupon the 
Referee shall enforce the penalty. 

Section 5. The Umpire may appeal to 
either of the other officials for testimony in 
cases of fouls seen by them. 

Section 6. The Umpire shall be respon- 
sible for the enforcement of the following 
rules : 

BRIEF OF RULES. 

(WHERE UMPIRE HAS JURISDICTION.) 
Rule III. — Players and Substitutes. 
Section 2— Substitutes. 
Section 3— Equipment of players, etc. 

Rule IV.— Length of Game. 

Section 3(a)— During intermission. 



140 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XXIX. 

Rule VI. — Definitions. 

Section 3— The line of scrimmage. 

Section 4 — Off-side. 

Section 5 — Fair catch. 

Section 8— Foul. 

Section 9— Out of bounds (on side opposite 
Linesman). 

Section 10— Tripping. 

Section 13 (b and c) — Ball kicked or passed out 
of bounds (on side opposite Lines- 
man). 

Section 15 — Touchback when forward pass 
crosses end line, etc. 

Section 17 — Crawling. 

Rule VIII. — Position of Players at Kick-off. 

Section 2— Kicker's side to be behind the ball. 

Rule IX. — Position of Players at Scrimmage. 
Section 1 — Seven players on line, etc. 

Rule X. — Position of Players at Kick-out. 

Section 4— Kicker's side behind the ball. 

Rule XL— Position of Players at Punt-out. 

Section 2 — Punter's side behind restraining 
line. 

Rule XII. — Position of Players at Place-kick fob 
Goal After Touchdown. 

Section 3— Kicker's side behind the ball. 

Rule XIII. — Position of Players on Free-kick 
After Fair Catch (Other Than Fair 
Catch from Punt-Out). 
Section 4— Kicker's side behind the ball. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 141 

RULE XXIX. 

Rule XIV. —No Player Out of Bounds. 

Rule XV. — Putting the Ball in Play. 

Section 11 — If player attempting to make a fair 
catch takes more than two steps. 

Rule XVII. — Unlawful Interference With Play. 
Section 2— Interference with opponents. 
Section 3— Interference with opportunity to 

make a fair catch. 
Section 4 — Maker of fair catch not to be 

thrown. 
Section 5— Signal for fair catch protects only 

the player signaling. 

Rule XVIII. — Obstruction of Opponents 

Section 1 — After the ball has been put in play. 
Section 2— If side in possession of ball kicks. 
Section 3— If side in possession of ball makes 
forward pass. 

Rule XIX. — Passing or Throwing the Ball. 

Section 4— Forward pass striking ground. 
Section 5— Forward pass crossing end line, etc. 
Section 6— Players who may receive forward 

pass. 
Section 7— Forward pass out of bounds (on 

side opposite Linesman) . 
Section 8— Batting the ball. 

Rule XX. — Off-side and On-side. 
Section 1— Players off-side. 
Section 2— Off-side player may touch ball 
when, etc. 



142 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XXIX. 

Section 3— Off-side player is put on-side 

when, etc. 
Section 4— Kicker may not recover ball. 

Eule XXIV. — Conduct oe Players. 

Section 1— Striking, kneeing, kicking, etc. 

Section 2— * 'Roughing the full-back. ' ' 

Section 3— Piling up. 

Section 4— Hurdling. 

Section 5 — Tripping, tackling out of bounds, 
etc. 

Section 6— Crawling. 

Section 7— Unsportsmanlike conduct. 

Section 8— Tackling. 

Section 10— Unfair play, not elsewhere pro- 
vided for. 

Eule XXV. — Conduct of Persons Other Than 
Players. 
Section 1 — Side line coaching. 
Section 2— Attendance on injured players. 
Section 3— Persons allowed on field of play. 
Section 4— Persons allowed on side lines. 

Rule XXVI. —Enforcement of Penalties. 

RULE XXX. 

. DUTIES OF THE LINESMAN. 

Section 1. The Linesman, under super- 
vision of the Referee, shall mark the dis- 
tances gained or lost in the progress of the 
play. He shall remain on or near one of 
the side lines throughout the game, and be 
provided with two assistants, who shall 
remain outside of the field of play. These 
assistants, in the measuring of distances, 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 143 

RULE XXX. 

shall use two rods about 6 feet in length and 
connected at their lower ends by a stout cord 
or chain 10 yards in length. The Linesman 
shall mark the position of the ball on each 
down by using a short iron rod. 

During the second half (unless otherwise 
ordered by the Referee) the Linesman and 
his assistants shall take their positions on 
the side of the field opposite to that occu- 
pied by them during the first half. 

Section 2. The Linesman shall mark the 
point where the ball goes out of bounds on 
the side of the field occupied by him. 

Section 3. The Linesman shall have juris- 
diction over, and shall report to the Umpire, 
any off-side play in the line and any tripping 
of ends after a kick. 

Section 4. He shall keep the time and 
shall use a stop-watch for this purpose. He 
should start the watch, not when the Referee 
orders play to begin, but when the ball is 
put in play. 

He shall notify the Captains of the time 
remaining for play not more than ten nor 
less than five minutes before the end of . 
each half ; and he may, upon inquiry, give 
the approximate remaining time to a Cap- 
tain at any time during the game, provided 
he does not comply with such a request 
more than three times during the last five 
minutes of either half. 

Section 5. The Linesman's jurisdiction 
under the following rules is exclusively 
as assistant to the Referee and Umpire, 
respectively, to whom he shall report. 



144 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE XXX. 

BRIEF OF RULES. 

(WHERE LINESMAN HAS JURISDICTION IN ASSIST- 
ING REFEREE AND UMPIRE.) 

Rule VI.- — Definitions. 

Section 13 (a and b)— Ball out of bounds on side 
of field occupied by him. 

Rule VIII. — Position of Players at Kick-off. 

Section 3 — Opponents behind restraining line. 

Rule IX.— Position of Players at Scrimmage. 

Section 2 — No player ahead of scrimmage line. 

Rule X.— Position of Players at Kick-out. 

Section 5— Opponents behind restraining line. 

Rule XL— Position of Players at Punt-out. 

Section 3 — Opponents behind restraining line. 

Rule XII.— Position of Players at Place-kick 
for Goal After Touchdown. 
Section 4— Opponents behind goal line. 

Rule XIII. — Position of Players on Free-kick Aftee 
Fair Catch. 
Section 5— Opponents behind restraining line. 

Rule XVI.— Delay of Game. 

Section 1 — Time taken out. 
Section 2 — By request of Captains. 

By order of Referee. 
Section 3— Length of delay. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 145 

RULE XXX. 

Rule XIX.— Passing or Throwing the Ball. 

Section 7 — Forward pass out of bounds on side 
of field occupied by him. 

Rule XXIV. — Conduct of Players. 

Section 1 — Striking, kneeing, kicking, etc. 
Section 2— ' 'Roughing the full-back. ' ' 
Section 3— Piling up. 
Section 5 — Tripping, tackling out of bounds, 

etc. 
Section 7— Unsportsmanlike conduct. 
Section 8— Tackling. 
Section 10— Unfair play. 

Rule XXV. — Conduct of Persons Other Than 
Players. 
Section 1— Side line coaching. 

Rule XX VI.— Enforcement of Penalties. 



146 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



Addendum 

SUMMARY OF PENALTIES 

(For Convenience of Officials) 



Loss of Two Yards. 

Time taken out more than three times during a half, 
etc (Rule XVI. , Section 2.) 

Loss of Five Yards. 

Violation of off-side rule, illegal positions, etc. — 

At kick-off (Rule VIII.) 

At scrimmage . (Rule IX. ) 

At kick-out (RuleX.) 

At punt-out (Rule XL ) 

At try-at-goal (Rule XII.) 

At free kick (Rule XIII.) 

Player out of bounds— more than one violation in 

same scrimmage (Rule XIV.) 

Putting ball in play other than as provided— more 
than one violation in same scrimmage. 

(Rule XV., Section 1.) 
Guard carrying ball. . . (Rule XV. , Section 4. ) 
Feint to snap ball. . . . (Rule XV., Section 5.) 
Attempts to draw opponents off-side. 

(Rule XV., Section 6.) 

Player attempting fair catch taking more than two 

steps after catch. . . . (Rule XV., Section 11.) 

Unreasonable delay. . . . (Rule XVI., Section 3.) 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 147 

Interference with opponents before ball is put in play. 
(Rule XVII. , Sections 1 and 2.) 
Holding, etc., by defensive side. 

(Rule XVIII. , Sections 1(6) and 2(6). 

Crawling (Rule XXIV. , Section 6. ) 

Illegal tackling (Rule XXIV., Section 8.) 

Unfair play not specifically covered in rules. 

(Rule XXIV., Section 10.) 

Loss of Ten Yards. 

Interference by defensive side in case of forward 
pass. (Rule XVIII., Section 3.) 

Loss of Fifteen Yards. 

Failure of substitute to report. (Rule III., Section 2.) 
Illegal return to game. . . (Rule III., Section 2.) 
Player leaving field during one-minute intermissions. 

(Rule IV., Section 3(a). 
Interference with fair catch, etc. (Rule XVII. , Sec. 3.) 
Throwing player who has made fair catch. 

(Rule XVII. , Section 4.) 
Pushing, pulling, interlocked interference, etc. 

(Rule XVII. , Section 6.) 
Holding, etc., by side in possession of the ball. 

(Rule XVIII. , Section 1(a). 
Forward pass by side not putting ball in play. 

(Rule XIX., Section 2.) 

Piling up . (Rule XXIV., Section 3.) 

Hurdling (Rule XXIV., Section 4.) 

Tripping, tackling out of bounds, etc. 

(Rule XXIV., Section 5.) 
Side line coaching. . . . (Rule XXV., Section 1.) 



J48 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

Persons on field without permission of officials. 

(Rule XXV., Section 3.) 
More than one person walking on side lines. 

(Rule XXV., Section 4.) 

Loss of Twenty-five Yards. 

Team not ready to play at start of second half. 

(Rule IV., Section 3(6). 

Loss of Half Distance to Goal Line. 

Player disqualified for striking, kneeing, kicking, etc. 

(Rule XXIV., Section 1.) 
Foul within 1-yard line, etc. (Rule XXVI. , Section 7.) 

Loss of a u Down." 

Interference by side making forward pass— prior tc 

fourth down (Rule XVIII. , Section 3. ) 

Illegal forward pass— prior to fourth down. 

(Rule XIX., Section 3.) 
Forward pass striking ground— prior to fourth down. 

(Rule XIX., Section 4.) 

Kick from point less than 5 yards behind scrimmage — 

prior to fourth down. . . (Rule XXII. , Section 2.) 

Loss of Ball. 

Ball kicked out of bounds, unless touched, etc. 

(Rule XV., Sections 7, 8, 9.) 
Interference by side making forward pass— fourth 

down (Rule XVIII. , Section 3(a). 

Backward pass, out of bounds on fourth down. 

(Rule XIX., Section 1.) 
Illegal or incomplete forward pass— on fourth down. 

(Rule XIX., Sections 3 and 4.) 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 149 

If forward pass be illegally recovered or touched by- 
passer's side (Rule XIX., Section 6(a). 

Forward pass out of bounds "on the fly/' 

(Rule XIX., Section 7.) 

Batting the ball (Rule XIX. , Section 8. ) 

Off-side player touching ball. (Rule XX. , Section 2. ) 

Kicker recovering ball. . . . (Rule XX. , Section 4. ) 

Kick from point less than 5 yards behind scrimmage 

line— fourth down. . . (Rule XXII. , Section 2. ) 

Suspension. 

Illegal return to game. . . (Rule III., Section 2.) 

Illegal equipment (Rule III., Section 3.) 

Unsportsmanlike conduct. (Rule XXIV. , Section 7. ) 

Disqualification. 

Striking, kneeing, kicking, etc. (Rule XXIV. , Sec. 1. ) 
Roughing the full-back. (Rule XXIV., Section 2.) 

Forfeiture of Game. 

Refusal to abide by the Referee's opinion as to length 
of game. ....... (Rule IV. , Section 2. ) 

Refusal to play within two minutes after order by 
Referee (Rule XVI. , Section 3. ) 

Refusal to allow game to proceed. (Rule XXIV. , Sec. 9.) 



150 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



Notes 



Note 1. Timing and Signals of Officials. 

It is desirable to have a stop-watch for the Linesman, 
a whistle for the Referee and a horn of some kind for the 
Umpire and Linesman, in order to distinguish their calls 
from that of the Referee. 

Note 2. Rule III., Section 1. 

For the purpose of designating the positions the accom- 
panying diagram is inserted. 

Customary Naming of Positions. 



o 

End 


o 

Tackle 


o 

Guard 

o 

Half-back 


o 

Center 

o 

Quarter 

o 

Full-back 


o 

Guard 

o 

Half-back 


o 

Tackle 


o 

End 



Note 3. Rule VI., Section 11; Rule XXIV., Section 4-Step- 
ping Over a Player. 

Mere stepping over a prostrate player, though the player 
so doing may have momentarily both feet in the air at the 
same time, is construed as not being within the definition or 
prohibition of hurdling. 

Note 4. Rule XII. 

In case of a place-kick the kicker may touch or adjust the 
ball in the hands of the holder so long as the ball does not 
touch the ground. 

Note 5. Rule XIII., Section 5. 

The penalty under Rule XIII., Section 5, is to be enforced, 
though it results in placing the offending side behind its own 
goal line. A second offense behind the goal line is to be 
penalized exactly as if it had occurred inside the field of play. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 151 

Note 6. Rule XIX., Section 5. 

Of course the provisions of this section do not apply in a 
case where a forward pass is made by a team from behind 
its own goal line. 

Note 7. Rule XIX., Section 6 (a). 

It follows that a player who is more than one foot back of 
the scrimmage line and not one yard back of the scrimmage 
line is not eligible in any event to receive a forward pass. 
He cannot receive it as being the player on the end of the 
scrimmage line, for he is not on the scrimmage line under 
Rule IX., Section i. He cannot receive it as a player back 
of the scrimmage line, because he is not at least one yard back. 

Note 8. Rule XXIX., Section 5. 

Captains and players may not, however, appeal to the 
Referee or Linesman for their testimony on points involv- 
ing disqualification. 



152 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 




No. 1. 
LEGAL POSITION OF BALL BE- 
FORE BEING PUT IN PLAY IN 
A SCRIMMAGE — The ball is fiat 

upon the ground with its long axis 
at right angles to the line of scrim- 
mage. (See Rule VI., Sec. 3, Page 96.) 




No. 2. 
ILLEGAL POSITION OF BALL BE- 
FORE BEING PUT IN PLAY IN 

A SCRIMMAGE— The ball is neither 
flat upon the ground, nor is its long 
axis at right angles to the line of 
scrimmage. (See Rule VI., Sec. 3, 
Page 96.) 




No. 3. 
ILLEGAL POSITION OF BALL BE- 
FORE BEING PUT IN PLAY IN 
A SCRIMMAGE-The ball is neither 
flat upon the ground, nor is its long 
axis at right angles to the line of 
scrimmage. (See Rule VI., Sec. 3, 
Page 96.) 




No. 4. 
ILLUSTRATION SHOWING THE 
TWO LINES OF SCRIMMAGE, 
ONE FOR EACH SIDE-Also show- 
ing the snapper-back with his head 
and hands legally off-side. (See Rule 
VI., Sec. 3, Page 96, and Rule IX, 
Sec. 2, Page 104.) 




No. 
LEGAL POSITION OF PLAYER 
SUPPOSED TO BE ON THE LINE 
OF SCRIMMAGE - Player No. 1, 
since he is one of the two players 
standing on either side of and next to 
the snapper-back, has legally locked 
legs with the snapper-back. (See 
Rule IX., Sec. 1, Page 103.) 



ILLEGAL POSITION OF PLAYERS 
SUPPOSED TO BE ON THE LINE 
OF SCRIMMAGE — Players num- 
bered 2 and 3 are not standing with 
both feet outside the outside foot of 
the player next to them, that is, they 
are illegally "locking legs." (See 
Rule IX., Sec. 1, Page 103.) 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



153 




ILLEGAL POSITION OF PLAYER 
SUPPOSED TO BE ON THE LINE 
OF SCRIMMAGE -The player fac- 
ing the reader has neither both hands 
nor both feet up to or within one foot 
of the line of scrimmage, nor has he 
one foot and the opposite hand up to 
or within one foot of it. Further- 
more, he has taken a position, facing 
away from the center, that will 
enable him the more rapidly to get 
into the interference. (See Rule 
IX., Sec. 1, Page 103.) 




No. 7. 

ILLEGAL POSITION OF PLAYER 
SUPPOSED TO BE ON THE LINE 
OF SCRIMMAGE— The player stand- 
ing back to the reader has neither 
both hands nor both feet up to or 
within one foot of the line of scrim- 
mage, nor has he one foot and the 
opposite hand up to or within one 
foot of it. Furthermore, he has 
taken a position facing in toward the 
center, that will enable him the more 
rapidly to get into the interference. 
(See Rule IX., Sec. 1, Page 103.) 




No. 8. 

ILLEGAL POSITION OF PLAYER 
SUPPOSED TO BE ON THE LINE 
OF SCRIMMAGE— The player in the 
foreground may be said to have both 
hands or one foot and the opposite 
hand, up to or within one foot of the 
line of scrimmage, but he has taken 
a position that will enable him the 
more rapidly to get into the inter- 
ference, and is therefore violating 
the spirit of the rule. (See Rule 
IX., Sec. 1, Page 103.) 





No. 10. 

VALID SIGNAL FOR A FAIR 
CATCH— The player, while advan- 
cing toward the ball, has raised his 
hand clearly above his head. (See 
Rule VI., Sec. 5, Page 96.) 

INVALID SIGNAL FOR A FAIR 

CATCH -The player, while advan- 
cing toward the ball, has not raised 
his hand clearly above his head. (See 
Rule VI., Sec. 5, Page 96.) 



154 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 




No. 11. 

ILLUSTRATION OF TRIPPING - 
The player wearing the sweater is 
obstructing the other player with that 
part of his leg that is below the knee. 
(See Rule VI., Sec. 10, Page 98.) 




No. 12. 

LEGAL USE OF BODY IN BLOCK- 
ING— The player on the right has 
thrown his shoulder against his op- 
ponent's thigh to block him away 
from the play, but is not using his 
hands or arms. (See Rule XVIII.) 





No. 13. 

ILLEGAL USE OF HANDS BY 
PLAYER OF SIDE IN POSSES- 
SION OF THE BALL-Player is 
grasping with his hands the foot of 
an opponent. (See Rule XVIII.) 



No. 14. 

ILLEGAL USE OF HAND AND 
ARM BY PLAYER OF SIDE IN 
POSSESSION OF THE BALL— The 
middle player of the group, in en- 
deavoring to protect the "runner" 
behind him, has grasped an opponent 
by the jersey. (See Rule XVIII.) 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



155 




No. 15. 

LEGAL POSITION IN BLOCKING— 
The player facing the reader has 
slipped his leg in between the legs of 
his opponent, but is not using his 
hands or arms to hold him there. 
Note— This case shades very rapidly 
into that indicated on plate No. 16. 
(See Rule XVIII.) 




No. 16. 

ILLEGAL USE OP HANDS AND 
ARMS IN BLOCKING-The player 
facing the reader has slipped his 
right leg in between the legs of his 
■opponent, and is holding his oppo- 
nent's right leg against his own by 
the use of his hand and arm. 
Note— The use of the leg, here 
pictured, is legitimate. (See Rule 
XVIII.) . 




No. 17. 

ILLEGAL USE OF ARM BY PLAY- 
ER OF SIDE IN POSSESSION OF 
BALL— Player No. 1, in endeavoring 
to obstruct an opponent, is using his 
arm to push an opponent away from 
the play. (See Rule XVIII.) 




No. 18. 

ILLEGAL USE OF HANDS AND 
ARMS BY PLAYER OF SIDE IN 
POSSESSION OF BALL-Player 
No. 1, in attempting to obstruct an 
opponent, has placed his hands upon 
an opponent to push him away from 
the play. (See Rule XVIII.) 



156 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 




No. 19. 

ILLEGAL USE OF HANDS AND 
ARMS BY PLAYER OF SIDE IN 
POSSESSION OF THE BALL-The 
player, in attempting- to obstruct his 
opponent, has circled him with his 
arm. (See Rule XVIII.) 




No. 20. 

ILLEGAL USE OF HAND AND 
ARM BY PLAYER OF SIDE IN 
POSSESSION OF THE BALL— The 
player, in obstructing; his opponent, 
has circled him with his arm and 
grasped him with his hand. (See 
Rule XVIII.) 





No. 21. 

ILLEGAL USE OF HANDS AND 
ARMS BY PLAYER OF THE SIDE 
IN POSSESSION OF THE BALL- 
The player has grasped his opponent 
around the knee and is lifting him tip. 
(See Rule XVIII.) 



No. 22. 

ILLEGAL USE OF ARMS IN LIFT- 
ING AN OPPONENT IN BLOCK- 
ING — The player on the right has 
managed to get under his opponent's 
right shoulder with both hands and 
is lifting him away from the play. 
(See Rule XVIII.) 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



157 




No. 23. 

ILLEGAL USE OF HANDS AND 
ARMS IN LIFTING AN OPPO- 
NENT IN BLOCKING— The player 
on the right has slipped both arms, 
from his elbow out, in under his op- 
ponent, and is commencing to lift 
him up and away from the play. 
(See Rule XVIII.) 




No. 24. 

LEGAL USE OF ARMS BY PLAYER 
OF SIDE IN POSSESSION OF 
THE BALL- Player No. 2, in at- 
tempting - to obstruct an opponent, is 
keeping his arms close to his body. 
(See Rule XVIII.) 




No. 25. 

LEGAL USE OF ARMS BY PLAYER 
OF SIDE IN POSSESSION OF 
THE BALL— Player No. 2, in at- 
tempting to obstruct an opponent, is 
keeping his arms close to his body. 
(See Rule XVIIL) 




No. 26. 



LEGAL USE OF HANDS AND 
ARMS BY PLAYER OF SIDE IN 
POSSESSION OF THE BALL— 
The player in the middle of the 
group, in attempting to obstruct an 
opponent, is keeping his hands to- 
gether and his arms close to his body. 
Note — The Committee wishes to 
make it plain that if, in interfering, 
a player keeps his hands together 
and close to his body, he may legiti- 
mately use the projecting portions 
of his arms. (See Rule XVIIL) 



158 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 




No. 27. 

ILLEGAL USE OF HANDS AND 
ARMS BY PLAYER OF SIDE 
IN POSSESSION OF BALL-The 
player in the middle of the group is 
attempting to obstruct an opponent 
by the use of his hands and arms— 
which are not close to his body. 
Note — The Committee wishes to 
make it plain that if, in interfering, 
a player does not keep his hands to- 
gether, and his arms close to his 
body— he may not legitimately use 
the projecting portions of his arms. 
(See Rule XVIII.) 




No. 28. 

ILLEGAL STRIKING, WITH THE 
LOCKED HANDS, BY A LINE 
MAN IN BREAKING THROUGH 
—The player on the right, having 
locked his hands, is on the point of 
dealing his opponent an upward 
blow under the chin. (See Rule 
XXIV., Sec. 1, Page 125.) 




No. 29. 

ILLEGAL STRIKING OF AN OP- 
PONENT IN THE FACE WITH 
THE HEEL OF THE HAND BY 
A PLAYER ON DEFENSE-The 
player on the right, who is on the 
defense, is on the point of striking in 
the face, with the heel of his hand, 
the opponent who is carrying the ball. 
(See Rule XXIV., Sec. 1, Page 125.) 




No. 30. 

LEGAL TACKLING ABOVE THFj 
KNEES- (See Rule XXIV., Sec. 
Page 127.) 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GO IDE. 159 



Index to Rules 



RULE PAGE 

Advance of baU 21 124 

Appeal — Captains and players may not, to Referee or Lines- 
man for testimony concerning violations under disqualifi- 
cation Note S 151 

Referee may, to other officials for testimony 28 133 

Umpire may, to other officials for testimony in cases of 

fouls 29 139 

Ball— Description of 2 91 

Batting : 19 122 

Carried forward by player first receiving it from snapper- 
back 15 111 

Holder of, in place-kick after fair catch, or touchdown, may 

be off-side or out of bounds 14, 29 111, 123 

Is dead 6 98 

Kicked, must go 10 yards 22 125 

Kicked, must cross line of scrimmage or touch opponent 

to afford opponent an equal chance at 21 124 

Kicked out of bounds belongs to opponents 15 113 

Kicked, touching player when off-side 20 123 

Kicked, touched while in air by player of kicking side 

inside 10-yard line, touchback 20 123 

Measuring position of, when dead . . 21 124 

Methods of Kicking 6 95 

Drop-kick 6 95 

Free-kick 6 95 

Kick-off 6 95 

Kick-out ... 6 95 

Place-kick 6 95 

Punt 6 95 

Punt-out 6 95 

Must be advanced 10 yards in four downs 21 124 

No rotation of, before measurement 21 124 

No interference before ball is in play 17 115 

Position of, when dead 6 99 

Put in play from but of bounds 15 113 

Put in play from scrimmage .....6,15 96,111 

Referee judge of putting in play and progress of....... 28 133 

Throwing, passing :...... 19 119 

When dead ..:... 6 98 

When dead, may not be put in play except by rule......... 6 9S 

When declared dead, scrimmage ends ". - 6 96 

When out of bounds ....;. i ;;;. ... .. 6 '99 

Batting — Bail toward opponents' goal ......; * 19 122 



160 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE PAGE 

Brief of Rules — Where Referee has jurisdiction 28 134 

Where Umpire has jurisdiction 29 130 

Where Linesman has jurisdiction 30 144 

Clothing — Restrictions on 3 92 

Coaching — Penalty for, 15 yards 25 12S 

Conduct of players 24 125 

Of persons other than players 25 12S 

Unsportsmanlike 24 127 

Crawling 6 101 

Darkness 4 03 

Dead— When ball is 6 OS, 00 

Definitions — Crawling G 101 

Down 6 OS 

End zones 1 01 

Fair catch G 06 

Fair catch, mark of 6 07 

Fair catch, not made 6 0G 

Field of play 1 01 

Foul G 07 

Goal from field 6 07 

Goal from touchdown G 07 

Hurdling 6 OS 

Out of bounds 6 OS 

Safety 6 101 

Scrimmage G 0G 

Scrimmage, line of G 0G 

Scrimmage, player on line of 104 

Touchback 6 100 

Touchdown 6 00 

Tripping G OS 

Delay — Deliberate fouls 24 127 

Interference with opponents before ball put in play re- 
garded as 17 115 

Not longer than two minutes 1G 115 

Disqualification (and loss of half distance to goal line) 24 126 

Penalty for roughing kicker 24 12G 

Distance — Half remaining, to goal line given for foul inside 

1-yard line 2G 131 

Necessary on kick , 22 125 

To be gained and number of down unchanged after penalty 

for coaching from side lines, etc 25 12S 

To be gained, and number of down unchanged after time 

has been taken out more than 3 times 16 114 

Down — Definition of 6 OS 

And point to be gained for first, remains same after penalty 

inflicted on side in possession of ball 26 130 

First, following distance penalty, if side not in possession is 

penalized 26 130 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 161 

Down — Definition of^-Continued. RULE PAGE 

If neither side in possession of ball when foul committed it 
shall go to offended side as first, at spot where foul 

occurred 26 130 

If foul committed after gain of such length, that after 
exaction of penalty, ball still in advance of point neces- 
sary for first down, ensuing down shall be first 26 130 

Number of, after time called more than 3 times 16 114 

Number of, and distance to be gained unchanged in penalty 

for coaching from side lines, etc 25 12S 

Number of, and point to be gained for first, after palpably 

unfair act 24 12S 

Downs — Consecutive 21 124 

Necessary gain in four 21 124 

Drop-kick 6 95 

Duties of officials 28-30 132-145 

Enforcement of penalties 26 130 

Equipment of players 3 92 

Fair Catch — Definition of 6 96 

Ball put in play after 15 111 

Holder of ball, in place-kick after, or touchdown, may be 

off-side or out of bounds 14 111 

If not made from punt-out on first attempt, ball is kicked off 15 114 

Interference with opportunity for making 17 116 

Kick from, must go 10 yards 22 125 

Mark of 6 97 

No interference with, by opponents 17 116 

Not made 6 96 

Opportunity to make, defined 6 97 

Player may not be thrown to ground after making 17 116 

Position of opponents after 13 110 

Signal for 6, 17 96, 116 

Field — Diagram of 1 90 

Dimensions of 1 91 

Marking of 1 91 

Field of play 1 91 

End zones 1 91 

Flying tackle 24 127 

Porward Pass — Crossing end line on fly 19 121 

By side not putting ball in play 19 120 

Incompleted 19 121 

Going out of bounds 19 122 

May be touched by 19 121, 122 

One, to each scrimmage 19 121 

Must be made from 5 yards back 19 120 

Forfeiture of game , 4, 16, 24 93,115,128 

Foul — Definition of 6 97 

Ball may not be again put in play after, until penalty 

exacted or declined 15 111 



162 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

Foul — Definition ©f — Continued. BffLE PAGE 

Carrying ball across goal line or nearer to it than 1-yard 

line 26 131 

Committed after gain of such length that ensuing down 

counted first down even after exaction of distance penalty. 26 130 

Committed inside 1-yard line , 26 131 

Committed when ball not in possession of either side, 

penalty for 26 130 

Decision of Referee regarding, final where not specifically 

within jurisdiction of other official 28 132 

Deliberate, to delay game 24 127 

If Umpire signals, play continues until ball dead 29 139 

More than one signaled against same side during same play. 26 131 

Offended side may decline to accept penalty for 26 131 

An official signals against one side; an official signals against 

other side on same play 26 131 

Palpably unfair act 24 128 

Penalty for, inflicted by Umpire, takes precedence over Ref- 
eree's decisions (does not mean fouls called by Referee) . . 28 133 
Referee shall ascertain that each team is ready before 

ordering play after calling 28 133 

When signal for, has been given, Umpire shall enforce 

penalty 29 139 

Free-kick 6 95 

Position of players on 13 110 

Gain necessary, on downs 21 124 

Game — Length of . 4 93 

Beginning of game and of other three periods 7 102 

Shortening of, by agreement of captains 4 93 

Shortening on account of darkness 4 93 

Goal— Change of 7 102 

Choice of, at kick-off 7 102 

Distance penalties near 26 131 

From touchdown 6 97 

From field 6 97 

Goal lines 1 01 

Goal defined 1 91 

Where placed and dimensions of 1 91 

Hands and Arms — Used by runner 18 117 

Use of, by attacking side 18 117, US 

Use of, by defending side 18 117,118,119 

Use of, by players, running down field under kick 18 US 

Use of, when close to body 18 117, US 

Holding or unlawful obstruction — by side in possession 18 117 

Hurdling — Definition of 6 98 

Prohibition of 24 126 

Penalty for 24 126 

Interference — With fair catch 17 116 

With opponents before ball in play, no 17 115 

With snapper-back, no 17 115 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 163 

„ RULE PAGE 

Interlocked interference 17 116 

Interlocking Legs — Limitations on 9 104 

Intermission 4 93 

Kick — Fair, and equal chance at 21 124 

From behind line of scrimmage, kicker may not recover ball. 20 123 

Over goal line, before being touched, a touehback. ." 6 100 

Must be made from 5 yards back 22 125 

Must go 10 yards 22 125 

Out of bounds 6 99 

Touched inside 10-yard line by opponents, a touehback 6, 20 10O, 123 

Kicker, standing back of line of scrimmage, may not put men 

on-side or recover ball 20 123 

Kick-off G 95 

After try-at-goal and goal from field 7 102 

At beginning of first and third periods 7 102 

Ball kicked across goal line at . . . . 7 102 

Ball kicked out of bounds at 15 112 

Cannot score goal 6 97 

Choice of goals at 7 102 

Following failure to make fair catch on punt-out 15 114 

Must go 10 yards 22 125 

Player of kicker's side off-side at 8 103 

Position of opponents at 8 103 

Side scored upon has option of 7 102 

Kick-out 6 95 

Ball going out of bounds on 15 112 

Kick-out after safety 15 114 

Kick-out after touehback 15 114 

Must go 10 yards 22 125 

Positions of players at . . . 10 106 

Kneeing 24 125 

Language — Abusive or insulting 24 127 

Legs — Interlocking of, limitations on 9 104 

Length of game 4 93 

Length of periods 4 93 

Linesman — Duties of 30 142 

Brief of rules where, has jurisdiction 30 144 

Marks distances gained or lost 30 142 

Remains on side lines, and provided with two assistants... 30 142 

Responsible for off-side play 30 143 

Responsible for tripping of ends after a kick 30 143 

Locked interference 17 116 

Movement — Allowed before ball put in play 9 105 

"Neutral zone" — Formed by two lines of scrimmage (see 

"Line of Scrimmage") 6 96 

Notes 150 

Number of players 3 92 

Obstruction — Lawful and unlawful 18 117,118,119 



164 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE PAGE 

Officials 27 132 

Linesman — Duties of 30 142 

Brief of rules where, has jurisdiction 30 144 

Referee —Duties of - 28 132 

Brief of rules where, has jurisdiction 28 134 

Umpire — Duties of 29 13S 

Brief of rules where, has jurisdiction 29 139 

Off-side — Defined 6 96 

Deliberate attempt of player other than snapper-back to 

draw opponents 15 112 

Holder of ball in place-kick after fair catch, or touchdown, 

may be, or out of bounds 14, 20 111, 123 

Kicked ball touched on fly by a player while inside opponents' 

10-yard line 20 123 

No player, behind his own goal line 20 123 

No part of any player shall be 9 104 

Player, how put , 20 123 

Player, put on-side 20 123 

Player while, may recover ball after a fumble 20 123 

Restrictions when 20 123 

Use of hands and arms by players, when running down field 

under kick 18 118 

Off-side play — Linesman responsible for 30 143 

On-side — Kicker, standing back of line of scrimmage may not 

put players 20 123 

Player off-side, put 20 123 

Out of Bounds— At kick-off, ball kicked 15 112 

Ball kicked, at kick-out 15 112 

Defined , 6 98 

Holder of ball in place-kick after fair catch or touchdown 

may be, or off-side 14. 20 111. 123 

Kick or forward pass going 15, 19 112,113.122 

No player may be, except 14 111 

Putting ball in play from 15 113 

Tackling runner 24 126 

Time taken out when ball 16 114 

Palpably Unfair Act — In case play interfered with by 24 128 

Passing — Ball toward opponents' goal 19 120 

Penalties — Disqualification and loss of half distance to goal 

line 24 126 

First down after distance 26 130 

Forfeiture 4, 16, 24 93.115,128 

Foul committed after gain of such length that ensuing down 

counted as first down, even after exaction of distance.... 26 130 

No right to decline 26 131 

Suspension 24 127 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 165 

RULE PAGE 
Penalty, Distance — Foul committed after gain of such length 

that after exaction of, ensuing down counted first down. . 26 130 
Inflicted on side not in possession of ball counted as first 

down 26 130 

That would carry ball near or over goal line 26 131 

When inflicted on side in possession of ball, number of down 

and point to be gained remains the same 26 130 

Piling up, no 24 126 

Place-kick 6 95 

Direct, player of side which has made touchdown shall 

hold ball for 12 108 

For try-at-goal following touchdown 23 125 

Holder of ball in try-at-goal by, may adjust ball Note 4 150 

Id. after a fair catch, or touchdown, holder of ball may be 

off-side or out of bounds 14, 20 111, 123 

In, direct, or preceded by a punt-out following touchdown 
opponents must remain behind their goal line until ball 

placed on ground 12 108 

Passing over cross-bar shall score 6 97 

Players — Number of 3 92 

Position of, at scrimmage 9 103 

Kick-off 8 103 

Punt-out 11 107 

Place-kick at goal 12 108 

Free kick ' 13 109 

Out of bounds 14 111 

Procedure in case of conflict of decisions 26 131 

Prohibitions — 

No acts of unnecessary roughness 24 126 

No coaching 25 128 

No crawling 24 127 

No hurdling 24 126 

No kicking 24 125 

No kneeing 24 125 

No piling up 24 126 

No pushing and pulling 17 116 

No striking in the face with heel of hand by player on 

defense 24 126 

No striking with fist or elbows 24 125 

No striking with locked hands by linemen 24 125 

No tackling below knees 24 127 

No tripping 24 126 

No tackling runner when clearly out of bounds 24 126 

No unsportsmanlike conduct — use of abusive or insulting 

language 24 127 

One representative only in case of accident 25 129 

Only one man may walk along side lines 25 129 

Punt 6 95 



166 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

RULE PAGE 

Punter, in case of punt-out 11 107 

Punter's side 11 107 

Punt-out 6 95 

Fair catch following 12 108 

If fair catch not made at first attempt on, ball goes as 

kick-off . 15 114 

Positions of players at 11 107 

Position of punter at, preceding try-at-goal 11 107 

Putting ball in play 15 111 

Referee — Appeal of, to other officials for testimony 28 133 

At beginning of game and when time out, shall ascertain 

from captains whether ready for play 28 133 

Brief of rules where, has jurisdiction 28 134 

Decision of, final on all points not specified under duties of 

Umpire 28 132 

Duties of 28 132 

Judge of forfeiture of game 28 132 

Judge of position and progress of ball 28 133 

Judge of putting ball in play 28 133 

Must allow precedence to penalties inflicted by Umpire 28 133 

Sole authority for score of game 28 132 

Representative, one, on field, in case of accident 25 129 

Roughness, Unnecessary 24 126 

Rules — List of. where Referee has jurisdiction 28 134 

Where Linesman has jurisdiction 30 144 

Where Umpire has jurisdiction 29 139 

Safety— Definition of 6 101 

Kicker's side must be behind ball on kick-out after 10 106 

Kick-out after 30 106 

Resulting from enforcement of penalty 6 101 

Scrimmage . 6 96 

Ball flat upon ground in 6 96 

Ball put in play by, after distance penalty 26 130 

Ball put in play from 15 111 

Counted as first down after distance penalty for foul by 

side not in possession of ball 26 130 

Ends when ball declared dead 6 96 

Line of '". 6 96 

No movement before ball put in play 9 105 

No part of any player shall be ahead of line of 9 104 

No player of the five middle players of the line may drop 

back from line of 9 105 

Number of down and point to be gained in, remain same 

when penalty inflicted on side in possession of ball 26 130 

One forward pass to each 19 121 

Player on line of 9 104 

Position of players at 9 104 

Putting ball in play by, after ballgoes out of bounds...... 15 113 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 167 

Scrimmage — Continued. RULE PAGE 
Seven players ®f offensive side must be on line of, when 

ball put in play >. 9 103 

Scoring — Referee sole authority for 28 132 

Value of plays in 5 04 

Side lines— Defined 1 01 

One man may walk along. 25 120 

Snapping the ball defined 6 05 

Entitled to full and undisturbed possession of ball 17 115 

Feint by player other than, to draw opponent off-side, ball 

not in play 15 112 

Feint to snap the ball by 15 112 

Must be on-side, except hand or foot 8 104 

No interference with 17 115 

Two men standing on either side of, maj' interlock legs 

with 104 

On-side 9 104 

Stop watch Note 1 150 

Striking — With fists or elbows 24 125 

In face with heel of hand 24 126 

With locked hands 24 125 

Substitutes 3 02 

Must report to Referee or Umpire before engaging in play 3 02 

Player replaced by, may return once in a subsequent period ' 3 02 

Suspension 24 127 

Tackling runner when out of bounds 24 120 

Below knees 24 127 

Tackling— Flying tackle 24 127 

Ten yards to be gained in four downs. 21 124 

Time — Called at end of period 4 04 

..Captain may ask for, three times during each two periods. . 16 114 

Linesman may give approximate whenever asked 30 143 

Linesman shall notify captains of remaining time for play.. 30 143 

Not called for end of period until ball is dead 4 04 

Taken out when ball out of bounds 16 114 

Penalty for more than three requests for, by captains...... 16 114 

Referee has discretionary power for calling 16 115 

Remaining for play 30 1 43 

When begins again « 16 114 

WTien calle'd, shall continue not more than two minutes 16 115 

When taken out ... 16 114 

Throwing — Ball toward opponents' goal •. . 10 120 

Touchback— Definition of 6 100 

From hick-off 7 102 

Not a touchback 6 100 

When kicked ball crosses goal line before being touched... 6 100 
When legal forward pass into or over end zone before 

being touched 10 121 



168 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 

Touchback — Definition of — Continued. rule PAGE 

When foul is committed behind opponents' goal line by side 

which put ball in play 6 101 

Touchdown — Definition of 6 99 

Holder of ball in place kick after, or fair catch, may be 

off-side or out of bounds 14, 20 111, 123 

In case of try-at-goal after, ball not kicked after touching 

ground 15 113 

In try-at-goal after, kicker may adjust ball Note 4 150 

Kick-off following try-at-goal after 15 114 

Marking of 6 99 

No change of goal following try-at-goal after T lu2 

Player of side which has made, shall hold ball for goal 

kick 12 108 

Position of opponents in try-at-goal after 12 109 

Side which has made, must try at goal 23 125 

Tripping— Definition of 6 9S 

Diving under play lawful 6 98 

Linesman responsible for, of ends after a kick 30 143 

Prohibition of 24 126 

Try-at-goal — After touchdown 23 125 

Ball held for 12 10S 

Holder of ball may be off-side or out-of-bounds in, from 

touchdown 14. 20 111, 123 

In case of, ball not kicked after touching ground, shall 

be kicked off 15 113 

Kicker may adjust ball for Note 4 150 

Kick-off following 15 114 

No change of goal following after touchdown 7 102 

. Position of opponents in 12 109 

Position of punter on punt-out preceding 11 107 

Umpire — Appeal by, to other officials for testimony in case 

of fouls 29 139 

Brief of rules where, has jurisdiction 29 139 

Decision of, final on fouls not within jurisdiction of 

Referee or Linesman 29 13S 

Duties of 29 138 

Enforcement of penalty by. for violations reported 29 139 

Judge of conduct of players 29 138 

Report to, by other officials of violations 29 139 

Use of hands and arms — By attacking side 18117,118,119 

By defending side 18117.118.119 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 169 



Officials 9 List American Intercollegiate 
Foot Ball Rules Committee, 1912 

(Subject to Additions and Corrections.) 

It is difficult for the Central Board to attempt to publish a complete list of 
satisfactory field officials, but in order to put the results of their work in 
more concrete form and preserve these data for convenience of managers, 
have prepared the enclosed partial list of men who have proved most service- 
able to the sectional committees in the East. West and South. It is hoped 
this will be of permanent value and simplify future arrangements. 

We take great pleasure in extending this to those whom it may aid. 

(Signed) CENTRAL BOARD ON OFFICIALS. 

JAMES A. BABBITT, Chairman, 

CRAWFORD BLAGDEN, 

WALTER CAMP, 

PARKE H. DAVIS, 

W. L. DUDLEY, 

E. K. HALL, 

C. W. SAVAGE, 

C. LINN SEILER, Secretary, 

121 So. 18th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

SUGGESTIONS FROM THE CENTRAL BOARD. 

The Central Board on Officials in concluding its work for the year would 
suggest the following plan for its work in the future: 

That the Central Board should be appointed by the Rules Committee whose 
function, (a) should be advisory, rendering assistance as indicated; (b) to 
assist by public interpretations of the foot ball rules; (c) to maintain a cer- 
tain control over sectional boards in the management of executive details; 
(d) to publish lists of accredited officials; (e) to offer recommendations for 
the conduct of these officials; (f) to arrange meetings for interpretation; (g) 
when advisable arrange conferences tending to the formation of sectional 
boards. 



170 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



LIST OF FOOT BALL OFFICIALS PUBLISHED BY THE 
CENTRAL BOARD ON OFFICIALS. 



Abbott, E. M., 
Adler, Waldo, 
Aiken, Jobn, 
Albert, C. L., 
Allen. Eugene E., 
Andrews, L. A., 
Baldwin, James, 
Bankart, George N.. 
Bankart, H. R., 
Barbe, Frank, 
Barber, C. N., Jr., 
Baynton, 0. A., 
Beacbam, J. W., Jr., 
Bennett, M. S., 
Bennis, Ed. N., 
Bentley, Wm. E., 
Bergen, M. V., Jr., 
Bird. Howard, 
Bootb, Walter C, 
Bower, John J., 
Boy son, Walter L., 
Bragg, E. L., 
Bray ton, Rowland W., 
Brenniek, Henry E., 
Brown, George V., 
Brown, R. M., 
Bruce, Harold A., 
Brumbaugh, A. K., 
Brumbaugh, R. Edw., 
Brill, A. E., 
Bryan, Julian S., 
Buckley, John T., 
Burke, Wm. H., 
Burleigh, Fred W., 
Burt, Harry A., 
Bush, George T., 
Butler, Haywood M., 
Cahill, J. W., 
Caine, Martin L., 
Campbell, George, 
Cannell, W. S., 



CENTRAL BOARD LIST. 

(U. of Pa.) 81S Land Title Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Sewauee) Training School, Springfield, Mass. 

(W. and J.) County Commissioners. Washington, Pa. 

(Lafayette) 36 North Washington Street, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

(Springfield Training School) 53 State Street, Boston, Mass. 

(Yale) Library Bureau, Cambridge, Mass. 

(Dartmouth) High School, Brockton, Mass. 

(Dartmouth) 95 South Street, Boston, Mass. 

(Dartmouth) 1S4 Summer Street, Boston, Mass. 

(W T aynesburg) Waynesburg. Pa. 

(Norwich) Box 128, Barre, Vt. 

(Bowdoin) North W T hitefield, Me. 

(West Point) W 7 est Point, N. Y. 

(U. of Pa.) 601 Pennsylvania Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(U. of Pa.) 2624 W. Fletcher Street, Philadelphia. Pa. 

13 Boutelle Street, Leominster, Mass. 

(Princeton) 1503 Land Title Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Yale) General Electric Co., Schenectady. N. Y. 

(Princeton )32 Liberty Street, New York City. 

(F. and M.) Belief onte, Pa. 

(Brown) Classical High School, Lynn, Mass. 

(Wesleyan) 43 Federal Street, Boston, Mass. 

(Harvard) 693 Washington Street, Dorchester. Mass. 

(Harvard) Boys' Latin School. Baltimore, Md. 

Boston Athletic Association, Boston, Mass. 

(Princeton) Princeton, N. J. 

(Sargent Normal) Lafayette College, Enston. Pa. 

(Lehigh) Maryland Casualty Co.. Baltimore. Md. 

(Gettysburg) Roaring Spring, Pa. 

(U. of Pa.) 79 South Washington Street, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

(Franklin, Haverford) Hamilton, N. Y. 

(Georgetown) 319-21 Arcade Building, Utica, N. Y. 

(W. P. I.) 16 Jefferson Street, Worcester, Mass. 

(Exeter) Peabody Square, Ashmont, Mass. 

(Tufts) 626 Old South Building, Boston, Mass. 

(Swarthmore, Penn State) Belief onte, Fa. 

(Brown) Allegheny Prep. School, Pittsburgh. Pa. 

(Harvard) 390 Main Street, Worcester, Mass. 

(Villanova, Yale), Waterbury, Conn. 

(Brown) Local Office, G. E. Co., Schenectady. N. Y. 

(Tufts) Rindge Technical School, Cambridge. Mass. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



171 



Carothers, Samuel, (Princeton) 421 Wood Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Carpenter, Percy R., (Harvard) Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. 

Cassidy, G. M., (Vermont) St. Anselm*s College, Manchester, Mass. 

Chez, A. W., (Oberlin) Gazette-Times, Pittsburgh. Pa. 

Clough, Wm. P., (Dartmouth) Soldiers' Hospital, Chelsea, Mass. 

Cober. E. W., (Bucknell) C.H.S., Bedford and Fulton Sts., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Cochems, E. B., (Wisconsin) People's Inst., 50 Madison Avenue, N. Y. City. 

Coleman, R. M., (Middlebury) Chester, Vt. 

Colter, Joseph, (Brown) Cheshire School, Cheshire, Conn. 

Cooke, M. F., Jr., (Virginia) General Electric Co., Schenectady, N. Y. 

Cooke, T. F., (M. A. C.) Pittsfield H.S., Pittsfield, Mass. 

Cooney, James, (Princeton) Meyers, N. Y. 

Cooper, Arthur D., (Harvard) Boston Post, Boston, Mass. 

Cooper. Charles D., (Lafayette, Bucknell) State Normal Sch., Brockport, N. Y. 

Cornwall, H. D., Beaver Falls, N. Y. 

Cosgrove, James J. (Cornell) 1763 Frick Building Annex, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Costello, J. H., (Cornell) care Bethlehem Steel Co., S. Bethlehem, Pa. 

Courtney, James P., (Lafayette) 47 Arlington Street, Worcester, Mass. 

Cousins, Howaid E., (Tufts) 93 Federal Street, Boston, Mass. 

Cozens, Ernest B., (U. of Pa.) 4921 Forbes Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Craver, F. E., (Dickinson) Carlisle, Pa. 

Croelius, Fred J., (Dartmouth) Gurney Bldg, 62 W. 45th St., New York City. 

Crooks, Thomas, (U. of Pa.) Y.M.C.A. Building, Newark, N. J. 

Crowell, W. G., (Swarthmore) 248 South 54th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Crowley, W. R., (Bowdoin) 449 Fourth Avenue, New York City. 

Curtin, Thomas F., (Fordham) Pittsfield, Mass. 

Curtis, R. C, (Cornell) Cochrantown, Pa. 

Cutts, 0. F., (Bates, Harvard) 124 East 2Sth Street, New York City. 

Dadman, H. L., (W. P. I.) care Dr. W. B. Thompson, 266 West Newton 

Street, Boston, Mass. 

Davidson, H. A., (U. of Pa.) 233 South 4th Street, Philadelphia, Fa. 

Davis, N. Evan, (Wesieyan) Middlesex Mut. Assn. Co., Middletown, Conn. 

Dearborn, A. K., (Wesieyan) 343 Old South Building, Boston, Mass. 

DeCamp, John A., (Williams) Little Falls, N. Y. 

DeMotte, L. W., (Haverford) Army and Navy Prep. School, 4109 Commercial 

Avenue, Washington, D. C. 

Denman, G. E., (Williams) Hackettstown, N. J. 

Denniston, Paul H., (U. of Pa.) 1025 Land Title Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

DeWitt, J. R., (Princeton) Riegel Sack Co., Jersey City, N. J. 

Dietrich, R. D., (Lafayette) 701 Allentown Bank Building, Allentown, Pa. 

Dodge, Gerard, (Harvard) 96 Beekman Street, New York City. 

Donnelly, Edwin J., (Trinity) 599 East Clinton Street, Elmira, N. Y. 

Donnelly, James! C, (Dartmouth) 340 Main Street, Worcester, Mass. 

Dorman, A. R., (Columbia) High School, New Bedford, Mass. 

Dcwd, H. L., (Princeton) 231 West 69th Street, New York City. 

Dowd, Thomas D., (Colgate) Post Office, Worcester, Mass. 

Dowling, Eugene, (Carnegie) 205 Lothrop Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Draper, D. W., (U. of Pa.) Trinity School, W. 91st Street, New York City. 

Draper, Louis L., (Williams) 434 Penn Street, Camden, N. J. 



172 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



Draper, Philip, 
Dunbar, Joseph R., 
Dunbar, R. B., 
Dunn. Joseph B., 
Dunn, William T., 
Easton, Edward, 
Eckles, Charles G., 
Edwards, H. M., Jr., 
Emmons, F. E., 



Ennis, Howard T., 
Evans, J. A., 

Farmer, Allen B., 
Farrer, W. F.. 
Farrier, A. M., 
Farson, J. P., 
Fauver, Edgar, 
Fauver, Edwin. 
Fisher, Harry A., 
Fitzgerald, Edwin P. 
Flanders, Carl S.. 
Fleming, M. Ward, 
Flinn, A. Rex, 
Foley, Arthur J., 
Foley, P. J., 
Folwell, Robert C, 
Forkum, Carl S., 
Fraim. I. U., 
Frank, Lieut. Jacob, 
Fry, Harry C, Jr., 
Fultz, David L., 
Gard, Walter E., 
Gibson, Edwin T., 
Gildersleeve, Wm. H 
Gillinder, Fred R., 
Godcharles, F. A., 
Goggin, W. J., 
Greene. E. H., 
Haines, Wilbur H., 
Haley, A. B., 
Hallahan, John J., 
Halliday, F. Wade, 
Hamilton, A. J. A., 
Hamilton, Benj. P., 
Hammond, Harry S., 
Hapgood, Ernest G., 
Hargrave, Newell H. 
Harrison, E. A., 



(Williams) 210 Ilium Building, Troy, N. Y. 

(Phila. Dental) 216 Bridge Street, Pkoenixville, Pa. 

(V. M. I.) 256 Broadway, New York City. 

(Tufts) D. U. House, Tufts College, Mass. 

(U. of Pa.) 3703 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. Pa. 

(Yale) 503 State Street, Albany, N. Y. 

(W. and J.) Haverford, Pa. 

(Lafayette) Title Guarantee and Surety Co., Scranton, Pa. 

(Cornell) Hebrew Tech. School, loth Street and Second 

Avenue. New York City. 
(Delaware) Dover, Del. 
(Williams) Little Falls, N. Y. 
(Dartmouth) 120 Tremont Street, Boston, Mass. 
(U. of Pa.) 901 Keenan Building. Pittsburgh. Pa. 
(Dartmouth) 140 Cedar Street, New York City. 
(Ohio Medical) Parkersburg, W. Va. 
(Oberlin) Middletown, Conn. 
(Oberlin) Princeton University, Princeton. N. J. 
(Columbia) 100 W T illiam Street, New York City. 
70 State Street, Boston, Mass. 
(Yale) 60 Broadway, New York City. 
(Haverford) Phillipsburg, Pa. 
(Yale 1006 Columbia Bank, Pittsburgh. Pa. 
(Hobart) Mann Building, Utica, N. Y. 
(Amherst) Amherst, Mass. 

(U. of Pa.) Johns Hopkins Athletic Assn., Baltimore, Md. 
(Penn. State) Woodlawn, Pa. 

(Vermont, Tufts) 4 Highland Avenue, Waltham. Mass. 
(Vermont) Fort McKinley. Me. 
(P. M. C.) 307 Fourth Avenue. Pittsburgh, Pa. 
(Brown) 41 W T all Street, New York City. 
(Yale) 64 Pearl Street, Hartford, Conn. 
(Cornell) 409 East 15th Street, New York City. 
(Wesleyan) New Wilmington, Pa. 

(U. of Pa.) 316 Stephen Girard Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 
(Lafayette) Milton, Pa. 
(Tufts) New Bedford, Mass. 
(Yale) 1091 Broad Street, Bridgeport, Conn. 
(Haverford) German Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa. 
(Wesleyan) Milton Academy, Milton, Mass. 
Boston Herald, Boston, Mass. 
(Dartmouth) Newport, Me. 

(Brown, U. of Pa.) 409 Mulberry Street, Boston, Mass. 
(Bowdoin) Delancey Sch., 1420 Pine St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
(Michigan) Pressed Steel Co., P. O. Box 53, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
(Brown) 19 Forest Street, Newton Highlands, Mass. 
(Yale) 17 Battery Place, New Y'ork City. 
(St. John's) National Life Insurance Co., 10 South Street, 

Baltimore, Md. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



173 



Hatch. James A., 
Herkimer, Ralph J., 
Herr, E. A., 
Hewitt, Edward A., 
Higley, H. R., 
Hinkey, Louis, 
Holmes, John M., 
Hopkins, Arthur H., 
Hoskins, G. W., 
Hoskins, Thos. L., 
How, Fred., 
Howard, H. R., 
Howell, A. Alex., 
Hubbard, John H., 
Hull, John C, 
Hull, Taleott B., 
Hurley, Dan J., 
Hutchinson, Daniel, 
Ingalls, Alfred W., 
Johnson, A. G., 
Jones, Harold W., 
Joy, John W., 
Kafer, F. W., 
Kail, I. J., 
Kelchner, C. S., 
Kelly, T. H., 
Kilpatrick, C. H., 
Kindgen, Wm. J., 
Knolt, O. W., 
Knox, William F., 
Krider, Walter W., 
Lamberton, Robt. Ei., 
Langford, W. S., 
Langford, A. M., 
Lantz, Charles P., 
Leary, Leo H., 
Lee, Walter, 
Levene. George, 
Linn, Willis, 
Lowe, Frank W., 
Luehriug, Fred W-, 
Lynn, Thomas, 
MacElree. J. P., 
MacElroy, A. J., 
Macguire, E. A., 
Macreadie, Andrew S., 
Mahoney, John D., 
Mahoney, Matthew, 
Marshall, Carl B., 



(Williams) 49 Wall Street. New York City. 

(Hackley School) Tarrytown, N. Y. 

(Dartmouth) 291 N. Main Street, Waterbury, Conn. 

(Penn State) 217 Bakewell Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

(Ohio) Stevens Institute, Hoboken, N. J. 

(Yale) 202 Broad Street, Tonawanda, N. Y. 

(Johns Hopkins) Central Y.M.C.A., Baltimore, Md. 

(Haverford) 1804 Pine Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Bucknell) Lewisburg, Pa. 

(Lafayette) 119 N. High Street, West Chester, Pa. 

Boston Journal, Boston, Mass. 

(Amherst) 911 Wilder Building, Rochester, N. Y. 

(Princeton) 1413 South 58th Street, Philadelphia, Pa . 

(Amherst) Montague City R.R. Co., West Pelham, Mass. 

(Bowdoin) Leominster, Mass. 

5 Church Street, New Haven, Conn. 

(Harvard) Boston City Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

(U. of Pa.) 1S37 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Brown) 505 Washington Street, Lynn, Mass. 

(Iowa State) 2S7 Hickory Street, Springfield, Mass. 

(Haverford) Commonwealth S. & L. Co., Whitman, Mass. 

(Yale) 50 State Street, Hartford, Conn. 

(Princeton) Lawrenceville, N. J. 

9 Ritter Building, Huntingdon, W. Va. 

(Lafayette) Myerstown, Pa. 

Portland A.C., Portland, Me. 

(Union) Chicopee, Mass. 

(Columbia) 22 Vesey Street, New York City. 

(Hamilton) Clinton Street School, Schenectady, N. Y. 

(Yale) Safe Deposit Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

(Swarthmore) 1170 Broadway, New York City. 

(U. of P.) 1406 Commonwealth Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Trinity) 510 Grand Central Station, New York City. 

(Trinity) St. James School, Washington Co., Md. 

(Gettysburg) Harrisburg Academy, Harrisburg, Pa. 

(Harvard) 709 Pemberton Bldg., Boston, Mass. 

(Bowdoin) Brunswick, Me. 

(U. of Pa.) Jerome and Shipman Avenues, Yonkers, N. Y. 

(Colgate) 1109 Madison Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

(Dartmouth) care Armour & Co., Worcester, Mass. 

(Northwestern, Chicago) 66 W T iggin St., Princeton, N. J. 

(Yale) 284 Newton Avenue, Camden, N. J. 

(U. of Pa.) West Chester, Pa. 

(Cornell) 35 West 32d Street, New York City. 

(Fordham) 229 West 58th Street, New York City. 

(Edinburgh) Portland R.R. Co., Portland, Me. 

(U. of Pa.) W. Phila. H. S. for Boys, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Georgetown) Boston City Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

(Harvard) 236 Industrial Trust Building, Providence, R. I. 



174 

Mayser, Charles W., 
McAvoy, W. J-, 
McCarthy, Chas. C, 
McCarthy, C. J., Jr., 
McCarthy, E. T., 
McClave, R. P., 
McCulloch. J. H., 

McFarland, Audley, 
McGrath, Hugh C, 
Merrirnan, D. W., 
Miller, C. L., 
Miller, J. A., Jr., 
Millham, Jesse B., 
Mitchell, C. H., 
Moffatt, Jas. Hugh, 

Moore, Charles C, 
Moorehead, John A., 

Morice, W. N., 

Morse, K. L., 
Morven, H. E., 
Moses, Kingsley, 
Mulford, Albert L., 
Mulry, Edward J., 
Munro, D. C, 
Murphy, Fred. J., 
Murphy, Fred W., 
Murphy, Thomas F., 
Nelly, Lieut. H. M., 
Nesbit, James L., 
Nelson, N. N., 
Newton, S. B., 
Noble, A. F., 
O'Brien, E. J., 

O'Brien, H. J., 

O'Connell, James E. 
O'Conner, John C, 
Okeson, W. R., 
Olcott, W. P., 
O'Ncil, F. J., 
Owsley. J. E., 
Page, J. W., 
Pallotti, Francis A. 
Palmer, A. /., 
Palmer, Samuel C, 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



(Yale) Tome School, Port Deposit, Mi. 

(Lafayette) Newark, Del. 

(Georgetown) 141 Milk Street. Boston, Mass. 

Germantown Academy, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Holy Cross) Spaulding-Jennings Works, Jersey City, N. J. 

(Princeton) Cliffside, N. J. 

(Springfield Training School) Carnegie Technical School, 

Pittsburgh. Pa. 
(W. & J.) 715 Park Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
(Boston Coll.) 43 Tremont Street, Boston, Mass. 
(Geneva) Keystone Driller Co., Beaver Falls, Pa. 
(Haverford) U. of Pa. Law- School, Philadelphia, Pa. 
(Swarthmore) Wabash Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
(Hamilton) 280 Lyell Avenue, Rochester, N. Y. 
(Wesleyan) 21 Howard Street, Portland. Me. 
(Princeton) care Holmes Press, Juniper and Cherry Streets, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
(IT. of Me.) 38 Exchange Street, Lynn, Mass. 
(Yale) care Moorehead Bro. & Co., Inc.. Pittsburgh. Pa. 
(U. of Pa.) care Philadelphia Bag Co., Water and Tasker 

Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. 
(Dartmouth) High School. North Abington, Mass. 
(N. Y. U.) University Heights, New York City. 
St. Andrew-' s School, Concord, Mass. 
(U. of Pa.) 1623 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
(Amherst) Box 471, Methuen, Mass. 
(Bowdoin) 2 Winston Building. Utica, N. Y. 
(Yale) 39 Warren Street, New York City. 
(Brown) 41 Wall Street, New T York City. 
(Harvard) 709 Sears Building, Boston, Mass. 
(West Point) Parkersburg, W. Va. 
(Lafayette) 59 Wall Street, New York City. 
(Geneva) Beaver, Pa. 

(U. of Pa.) 829 West End Avenue, New York City. 
(Amherst) Box 71S, Providence, R. I. 
(Tufts) St. Elizabeth's Hospital, 61 West Brookline Street, 

Boston, Mass. 
(Swarthmore) Delancey School, 1430 Pine Street, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 
(Harvard) 53 State Street, Boston, Mass. 
(Dartmouth) 1037 Elm Street, Manchester, N. H. 
(Lehigh) Phoenix Bridge Co., 49 William St., N. Y. City. 
(Yale) 30 West 44th Street, New York City. 
(Williams) 16 White Memorial Bldg., Syracuse, N. Y. 
(Yale) N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R.. New Haven, Conn. 
(O. W. U.) Pittsburgh A. C. Pittsburgh, Ta. 
(Holy Cross) 16 Village Street, Hartford, Conn. 
(Colby) Haverford School, Haverford, Pa. 
(Swarthmore) Swarthmore, Pa. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



175 



Patch, RalphS., 
Pauxtis, S. Francis, 
Pendleton Joseph B., 

Pfeiffer, Newell, 
Phillipy, N. G., 
Pierce, Franklin E., 
Pifer, H. W., 
Poe, Gresham H,, 
Porter, M. N., 
Powers, John A., 
Price, Charles E., 
Pulsifer, Nathan, 
Pyne, Francis R., 
Quill, James J., 
Eafferty, E. L., 
Rahn, C. S., 
Ramsey, Frank M., 
Ramsclell, Fred L., 
Reed. Carl A., 
Risley, A. W., 
Rittman, W. F., 
Roberts, H. W., 
Robinson, Fred, 
Robison, John I., 
Roper, William W., 
Rose, Floyd, 
Rugh, Frank C, 
Samson, P. B., 
Saul, Bertram U., 
Saunders, Leon G., 
Sawyer, Enos K., 
Saylor, 0. Webster. 
Scanlon, Thomas A., 
Scarlett, Hunter W., 
Schwartz H. M., 
Schwartz, V. A., 
Scudder, E. R., 
Seeley, S. B., 
Selvage. I. Lester, 
Shade, R. S., 
Sharpe, Albert H., 
Shaw, Reuben T., 

Sheble, J. H., Jr., 
Short, Chas. W., Jr., 
Short, Harold H., 
Sieber, Paul R., 
Sigman, George A. » 



(Amherst) Swarthmore, Pa. 

(U. of Pa.) 39 Russell Street, Edwardsville, Pa. 

(Bowdoin) William Filene's Sons' Co., Washington Street, 

Boston, Mass. 
(Princeton) 42 Broadway, New York City. 
(Gettysburg) Gettysburg, Pa. 
(Amherst) 150 Leroy Street, Binghamton, N. Y. 
(F. and M.) Conway Hall, Carlisle, Pa. 
(Princeton) 8 South Street, Baltimore, Md. 
(Colgate) Swarthmore, Pa. 

(Holy Cross) 1921 Wallace Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Huntingdon Valley, Pa. 

(Bates, Cornell) 472 Beacon Street, Lowell, Mass. 
(Lehigh) 525 Westminster Avenue, Elizabeth, N. J. 
(Amherst, Yale) Court House, Jersey City, N. J. 
(Princeton) 129 Bakewell Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
(Ursinus) 176 Church Street, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
(Haverford) 3601 Locust Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
(U. of Pa.) 5136 Woodlawn Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pi. 
(Hebron) 287 Hickory Street, Springfield, Mass. 
(Colgate) State Normal College, Albany, N. Y. 
(Swarthmore) SwarthmoreCollege, Swarthmore, Pa. 
(Tufts) L. B. 501, Syracuse. N. Y. 
(U. of Pittsburgh) State College, Pa. 

(Jefferson, Penn State) 306 Washington Ave., Scranton, Pa. 
(Princeton) 618 Stephen Girard Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 
(U. of Pittsburgh) 901 Fulton Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
(Gettysburg, U. of Pitts.) 314 Lloyd Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
(Springfield) Rensselaer Poly. Inst., Troy, N.Y. 
(Otterbein) 226 Maclay Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 
(Columbia) Stevens School, Hoboken, N. J. 
(Dartmouth) Franklin, N. H. 

(F. and M.) Greensburg High School. Greensburg, Pa. 
(Fordham) 582 East 5th Street, South Boston, Mass. 
(U. of Pa.) 22 Bodine Hall, U. of Pa. Philadelphia, Pa. 
(Hamilton) Morgan Street School, Ilion, N. Y. 
(Brown) 60 Arlington Street, Newark, N. J. 
(Brown) Western Electric Co., 463 West Street, N. Y. City. 
(Dickinson) Berwick, Pa. 
(Columbia) 760 Broad Street, Newark. N. J. 
(Purdue) Houston Hall, U. of Pa., Philadelphia, Pa. 
(Yale) Cornell Athletic Assn.,, Ithaca, N. Y. 
(O. W. U.) Boys' High School, 36th, and Chestnut Streets, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
(U. of Pa.) 1538 Land Title Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 
(Harvard) 15 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. 
(Princeton) Browe Co., 9 Franklin Street, Newark, N. J. 
(Gettysburg) 510 N. Broadway, Baltimore, Md. 
(Lafayette) 1326 Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



176 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



Simpson, John R., (F. & M.) 5822 Ellsworth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Siminonds, A. P., (Yale) 52S Land Title Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Sinclair, Samuel, (Swarthmore) 702 National Bank Building, Allentown, Pa. 

Smith, Harvey T., (Bueknell, U. of Pa.) 130 State Street. Harrisburg, Pa. 

Smith, Paul G., (Bueknell) 31 North Second Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Smith, S. S., (Indiana) Mercer, Pa. 

fe'outhworth, E. F., (Harvard) 314 Highland Avenue, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Spiers, H. W., (Oberlin) P. and S. Club, W. 57th Street, New York City. 

Squiers, B. H., (Harvard) 640 Tremont Building, Boston, Mass. 

Stahr, Charles R., (F. & M.) 17 E. Walnut Street, Lancaster, Pa. 

Stauffer, H. A., (Gettysburg), Gettysburg, Pa. 

Stevenson, R. C, Exeter, N. H. 

Strauss, Samuel, (Lehigh) Third and Pine Streets, South Bethlehem, Pa. 

Stroud, C. C, (Tufts) University of Rochester, Rochester, N. Y. 

Stuart, C. B., (Yale) 236 West 59th Street, New Y^ork City. 

Sugden, Walter S., (Harvard) Sistersville, W. Ya. 

Sweet, Lynn 0., (Bueknell) care Carnegie Steel Co., Munhall. Pa. 

Swenson, Karl, (U. of Pittsburgh) 712 W T ood Street, Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

Taggert, Edgar C, (Rochester) 324 Pine Street, Steelton, Pa. 

Taussig, Charles A., (Cornell) 220 Broadway, New York City. 

Thompson, M. J., (Georgetown) St. Mary's College, Emmitsburg, Md. 

Thorn, H. N., (Haverford) 1136 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Thorpe, E. J., (La Salle) 16 E. 42d Street, New York City. 

Thorpe, Thos. J., (Columbia) N. Y. Evening Journal, New York City. 

Topper, R. F., (Gettysburg) Gettysburg, Pa. 

Torrey, Robert G. f (U. of Pa.) 255 S. 16th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Townsend, H. C., (Columbia) 107 E. 14th Street, New York City. 

Trask, T. C, (Yale, Columbia) Commercial H.S., Albany and Bergen 
Streets, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Tufts, Nathan, (Brown) 681 Main Street, Waltham, Mass. 

Twitchell, F. Q., (P. A. C.) 50 Turner Street, Portland, Me. 

Tyler, A. C, (Princeton) Haverford School, Haverford, Pa. 

Vail, Fred C, (U. of Pa.) George School. Bucks County, Pa. 

Vail, Louis De P., (U. of Pa.) 505 Franklin Bank Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Valentine, H. M., (N. Y. U.) Lartex Co., 66 Leonard Street, New York City. 

Vorse, Albert O., (Bueknell) Ardmore, Pa. 

Walker, James A., (U. of Pa.) 1617 Green Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Ward, W. D., (Princeton) 20 Grove Place, Rochester, N. Y. 

Waring, Lee K., (Swarthmore) 185 Market Street, Newark, N. J. 

Washburne, L., (Brown) 1324 Locust Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Watkeys, D. H., (Syracuse) 207 Bellevue Avenue, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Weeks, H. G., (Syracuse) 235 Court Street, Binghamton, N. Y. 

Weyinouth, C. A., (Bueknell, Yale) 327 Real Estate Trust Building. Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

Whiting, A. E., (Cornell) 1025 Vine Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Whetstone, S. B., (U. of Pa.) 183 City Hall, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Whittemore, A. H., (Brown) 406 Union Trust Building, Providence, R. I. 

Williams, C. R., (Virginia) 604 First National Bank Building. Roanoke, Ya. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



177 



Williams, Carl S., (U. of Pa.) School Lane and Green Street, Germantown, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Williams, J. F., (Oberlin) Teachers' College, New York City. 

Williams, R. R., Jr., (Williams) Kidder, Peabody & Co., 56 Wall St., N. Y. City. 

Wilson, G. R., (Middlebury) Blairstown, N. J. 

Wingert, W. F., (Delaware) Box 206, Newark, Del. 

W T olfe, Joseph M., (Bueknell, Cornell) 16 South Third Street, Lewisburg, Pa. 

Woodlock, Albert J., Boston Globe, Boston, Mass. 

Wright, C. A., (Williams) 61 Genessee Street, Auburn, N. Y. 

Young, C. P., (Cornell) Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Young, Edwin V., (Cornell) Towanda, Pa. 

Young, George H., (Cornell) 816 Hepburn Street, Williamsport, Pa. 

Young, Homer N., (Gettysburg, Michigan) Bakewell Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Ziegler, A. B., (U. of Pa.) 1313 South 52d Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Zimmer, Edward G,, (Rochester) 605 Wilder Building, Rochester, N. Y. 



178 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



LIST OF FOOT BALL OFFICIALS PUBLISHED BY THE 

INTERCOLLEGIATE CONFERENCE COMMITTEE 

ON FOOT BALL OFFICIALS. 



Prof. T. F. Moran, Purdue. 

Prof. R. E. Wilson, Northwestern. 

Prof. A. G. Smith, Iowa, Chairman. 



Allen, Harry I., 
Anderson, John E., 
Baer, W. H., 
Baker, I. H., 
Baker, H. W., 
Ball, C. C, 
Barney, W. Ray, 
Bell, Charles L., 
Benbrook Albert, 
Birch, F. E., 
Bokum, Norris H., 
Boles, L. C, 
Bookman, C. M., 
Bradshaw, M. H., 
Brewster, A. A., 
Burroughs, Wilbur G. 
Cameron, R. L., 
Carr, Harry A., 
Cermak, Jerome, 
Chase, C. F., 
Clark, D. B., 
Clausen, E. W., 
Coggeshall, H. H., 
Cole, W. D., 
Colton, C. C, 
Compton, I. T., 
Conner, Ed. F., 
Connett, W. C, 
Corbett, John, 
Coupland, J. D., 
Crawford, J. A., 
Cross. C. W., 
Cunningham, W.M., 
Daniel. George, 
Davis, Ralph, 
Day. A. II., 
Dayton, R. B., 



WESTERN LIST. 

(Northwestern) 700 Commercial Bank Bldg., Chicago. 

(Chicago) 1501 East 65th Place, Chicago. 

(Oberlin) 806 Columbia Building, Cleveland, O. 

(Case) 710 Citizens Building, Cleveland, 0. 

(0. W. U.) Huron College, Huron, S. D. 

(Coe) 1536 First Avenue, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

(W. R. U.) 2191 East 71st Street, Cleveland, O. 

(Iowa) 725 College Street, Iowa City, Iowa. 

(Michigan) 523 Park Place, Milwaukee, Wis. 

(Earlham) Cedar Falls, Iowa. 

(Princeton) 1504 Harris Trust Building, Chicago. 

(0. W. U.) Fostoria, O. 

(Otterbein) 403 King Avenue, Columbus, 0. 

(Hiram) West Side Y.M.C.A., Cleveland, O. 

(Cornell) care Diamond Rubber Co., Akron, 0. 

(Illinois) 1533 11th Avenue, Moline, 111. 

(O. W. U.) Western Reserve Medical College, Cleveland, 0. 

(Swarthmore, Ohio State) 1714 N. 4th Street, Columbus, 0. 

(Illinois) 925 East 62nd Street, Chicago. 

(Michigan) Room 22, Haymarket Theatre Bldg., Chicago, 111. 

(0. S. U.) Everts High School, Circleville, 0. 

103 North 4th Street, Atchison, Kan. 

(Grinnell) 208 Crocker Building, Des Moines, Iowa. 

(Michigan) 733 State Street, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
(Dartmouth) 1105 Alworth Building, Duluth, Minn. 

(Wooster) Wooster. 0. 

(Bates) Lincoln High School, Cleveland, 0. 
(Virginia) Third National Bank Bldg., St. Louis, Mo. 

(Harvard) 123 Bealle Avenue, Wooster, 0. 

(Wooster) Western Reserve Medical College, Cleveland, 0. 

(Wooster) London, 0. 

(Cornell) Ford Building, Detroit, Mich. 

(Michigan) Lexington, Ky. 

(0. W. U.) Lorain High School, Lorain, O. 

(Princeton) care The Waverly Co., Indianapolis, Ind. 

(0. W. U.) High School, Ashtabula, O. 

(Marietta) New Martinsville, W. Va. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



179 



Dougherty, Dan B., 
Dowries, O. F., 
Duffy, William HE., 
Durfee, James B., 
Eckersall, W. H., 
Eckstorm, John B. C, 
Edmunds, W. P., 
Eldridge, C. E., 
Endsley. Louis E., 
Esterline, J. W., 
Farson, J. P., 
Ferguson, Ben M., 
Fish, F. W., 
Fishleigh, W. T., 
Flad, Erie L., 
Fleager, A. B. t 
Freeman, C. I., 
Gale, Henry G., 
Gardner, Fred E., 
Gardner, Lion, 
Gibson, R. H„ 
Glerum, Jay B. f 
Gordon, W. C, 
Graham, Gus, 
Gray, GlenC, 
Graydon, Bruce, 
Hackett, Lt. H.B., 
Hadden, Harry, 
Haggarty, Frank, 
Haines, Anthony, 
Halligan, J. E., 
Hamm, Fred H., 
Hammerson, E. J. 
Hammond, TomS., 
Harding, E. P., 
Harding, T. T., 
Hargrave, Newell, 
Harlan, Rolvix, 
Harris, Robert S., 
Hatfield, C. N., 
Heneage, H. R., 

Heinzman, Harry L., 
Henry, Donald J., 
Heth, L. D., 
Hewitt, William F., 
Hinaman, A. W., 
Hinman, C. F., 
Hobart, C. G., 



(Washington and Jefferson) 61 E. Monroe Street, Chicago. 

(Mt. Union) 309 Williamson Building, Cleveland, O. 

(Central University) 901 Realty Building, Louisville, Ky. 

(Williams-) 1365 East Long Street, Columbus, 0. 

(Chicago) care Chicago Tribune, Chicago, 111. 

(Dartmouth) 208 East 11th Avenue, Columbus, O. 

(Michigan) 420 South Pearl Street, Youngstown, 0. 

(Michigan) 1132 Marquette Building, Chicago. 

(Purdue) 815 North 9th Street, Lafayette, Ind. 

(Purdue) 145 Andrew Place, West Lafayette, Ind. 

(Ohio Medical) Athens, O. 

(Chicago, Purdue) Detroit City Gas Co., Detroit, Mich. 

(Maine) 2135 Adelbert Road, Cleveland, 0. 

(Michigan) Ann Arbor, Mich. 

(Lafayette) 486 Madison Avenue, Youngstown, 0. 

(Northwestern) 322 West Washington Street, Chicago, 111. 

(West Tech. H.S.) Cleveland, O. 

(Chicago) care of University of Chicago, Chicago. 

(Cornell) Rochelle, 111. 

(niinois) 814 East 45th Street, Chicago. 

(Mt. Union) Alliance, 0. 

223 Wisconsin Street, Kenosha, Wis. 

(Harvard) Marshall, Mo. 

(Grinnell) 713 Fleming Bldg., Des Moines, Iowa. 

(Oberlin) Oberlin, 0. 

(Harvard) Cincinnati, 0. 

(West Point) care D. H. Burnham, Ry. Ex., Chicago, 111. 

(Michigan) P. 0. Box 605, Kenilworth, 111. 

(Colby) Buchtel College, Akron, O. 

(Yale) Brown Building, Rockford, 111. 

(Mass. State) Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, La. 

(Kenyon) 449 Wilson Avenue, Columbus, O. 

(Wisconsin) Janesville, Wis. 

(Michigan) care Whiting Foundry Equip. Co., Harvey, 111. 

(Minnesota) Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 

(Oberlin) care Plain Dealer, Cleveland, O. 

(Yale) Union Trust Building, Cincinnati, O. 

(Geo. Washington) 2821 East 8th Street, Kansas City, Mo. 

(Chicago) 836 East 45th Street, Chicago, 111. 

(Michigan) Fostoria, O. 

(Dartmouth) care Jos. T. Ryerson & Son, 16th and Rockwell 

Streets, Chicago. 
(Kansas) 718 Kansas Avenue, Topeka, Kan. 
(Kenyon) 1120 Franklin Avenue, Circleville, O. 
(Chicago) 6040 Ellis Avenue, Chicago. 
(Chicago) 6740 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, O. 
(Case) 2107 Adelbert Road, Cleveland, O. 
(W. Va. Univ.) 35% North High Street, Columbus, O. 
(Northwestern) 1423 Elmwood Avenue, Evanston, 111. 



180 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



Holderness, Jas. C, 
Hollenback, 0. D., 
Houghton, M. A., 
Hoyer, Ralph W., 
Hutchens, Arthur R., 
Hyland, Mark W., 
Inglis, W. D., 
Jenkins, E. J., 
Johns, H. B., 
Johnson, Alton F.f 
Jones, Ira A., 

Jones, F. T., 
Jones, T. Harvey, 
Jones, T. H., 
Kagy, E. L., 
Keeler, Ray D., 
Kellogg, Nelson A., 
Keithley, Giles E., 
Keyser, J. H., 
Kilpatrick, C. H., 
King, Gapt. Edw. L., 
Kittleman, C. W., 
Knight, William C, 
Knight, William D., 
Koehler, Dr. John P., 
Lambert, Dr. F. A., 
Lantry, Joseph T., 

Larson, L. L., 
Laub, W. J., 
Law, Dr. Fred W., 
Lind, J. L., 
Lloyd, H. B., 
Lloyd, E. G., 
Lloyd, Dr. William, 
Logue, J. C, 
Lowenthal, Fred, 
Lynch, Leigh, 
Masker, James C, 
MeCray, Alfred, 
McKay, John G., 

Means, Dr. Jack, 
Merrill, E. B., 
Metcalf, Keyes D., 
Mitchell, Ledyard, 
Mook, D. C, 
Morris, A. W., 



(Lehigh) care Eclipse Gas Stove Co., Rockford, 111. 

(Colgate) Goodrich Rubber Co.. Akron, O. 

(Oberlin) Oberlin, 0. 

(Ohio State) Capital Trust Building, Columbus, 0. 

(Purdue) 962 Cambridge Avenue, Milwaukee, Wis. 

(Iowa) Tama, Iowa. 

(W. and J.) Columbus, 0. 

(Northwestern) Big Rapids, Mich. 

(Mt. Union) Alliance, 0. 

(Northwestern) 232 North Halsted Street, Chicago, 111. 

(Drake) Physical Training Department, Public Schools, 

, Minneapolis, Minn. 

(Western Reserve) University School, Cleveland, 0. 
(Wisconsin) 307 Palladio Building, Duluth, Minn. 
(0. S. D.) 1300 Schofield Building, Cleveland, 0. 
(W. R. U.) 9508 Hough Avenue, Cleveland, O. 
(Indiana) 10 South LaSalle Street, Chicago, 111. 
(Michigan) Iowa City, Iowa. 

(Lake Forest, Illinois) 305 E. Green Street, Champaign, 111. 
(Wittenberg) Wittenberg College, Springfield, O. 
(Wisconsin) 28 South Wabash Avenue, Chicago. 
(West Point) Fort Leavenworth, Kan. 
(Northwestern) 161 West Harrison Street, Chicago. 
(Michigan) 533 North Capitol Avenue, Indianapolis, Ind. 
(Dartmouth, Harvard) Rockford, 111. 

(Nebraska, Chicago) care Majestic Bldg.. Milwaukee, Wis. 
(O. S. U.) Ohio State Univ., Columbus, O. 
(Notre Dame, Ohio State) Atlas Construction Co., Tulsa, 

Okla. 
(Chicago) care Underwood Typewriter Co., Louisville. Ky. 

(W. R. U.) Central Savings and Trust Building.. Akron, 0. 
(Ames) Winona, Minn. 

(W. R. U.) 1864 East S2d Street, Cleveland, O. 

(Wooster) Wooster, 0. 

(Otterbein) 100 Wyandotte Building. Columbus, 0. 

(0. S. U.) Columbus, 0. 

(W. R. U.) 2163 East 74th Street, Cleveland, O. 

(Illinois) Room 704, North Clark Street, Chicago. 111. 

(Brown) Studebaker Corporation, Detroit, Mich. 

(Northwestern) Kansas City A.C.. Kansas City. Mo. 

(Cincinnati) 1015 Reibold Building. Dayton. O. 

(Westminster) Prudential Casualty Co., Odd Fellows' 
Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 

(U. of I'.) Starling Medical Coll., Columbus. 0. 

(Oberlin) Cleveland Trust Co., Cleveland. O. 

(Oberlin) Oberlin, 0. 

(Yale) Mitchell Furniture Co., Cincinnati, 0. 

(W. R. U.) Williamson Building, Cleveland, 0. 

(Mt. Union) Alliance, O. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



181 



Mumma, Capt. M. C, 
Xewcomb, A. G., 
Nichols, J. H., 
O'Brien, Willis J., 
Osborn, I. S., 
Packard, Louis R., 
Page, J. W., 
Parratt, G. W., 
Pasini, H. F., 
Patton, E. E., 
Perrine, J. Owen, 
Pettigrew, James Q., 
Pinneo, George M., 
Pollock, Julian, 
Porter, Frank S., 
Porter, Morris N., 
Potts, J. F., 
Powell, H. T., 
Priddy, J. W., 
Prugh, E. E., 
Reid, A. G., • 
Reiter, B. F., 
Bobbins, W. D., 
Roberts, Chester C, 
Roblee, Dr. L. H., 
Rogrer, Dr. J. W., 
Roudebush, A. C, 
Rupert, Lewis, 
Rush, J. H., 
Safford, Orren, 
St. Clair, P. S., 
St. John, L. W., 
Secrest, F. H., 
Seymour, R. F., 
Siler, R. W., 
Smith, J. H., 
Smull, T. H., 
Snow, Niel W., 
Snyder, A. T., 
Snyder, J. Royal, 
Southwick, 
Spiers, H. W., M.D., 
Stanton, F. W., 
Starbuck, R. D.. 
Steele, Geo. H., 
Steverding, J. A., 
Stewart, Walter L., 
Swain, H. P., 
Terrell, T. Lu, 



(West Point) Iowa City, Iowa. 

(W. R. U.) Society for Savings Building, Cleveland, 0. 
(Oberlin) 1424 Morse Avenue, Rogers Park, Chicago. 
(Iowa) Iowa City, Iowa. 
(Purdue) 18 17th Avenue, Columbus, O. 
(Michigan) Iowa City, Iowa. 

(0. W. U.) Pittsburgh Athletic Club, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
(Case) 1904 East 81st Street, Cleveland, O. 
(Springfield Training School) Cedar Falls, Iowa. 
(O. W. U.) Goodrich House, Cleveland, O. 
(Iowa) 1005 Packard Street, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
(Illinois) care Enterprise Foundry, Harvey, 111. 
(Northwestern) care Y.M.C.A. Building, Gary, Ind. 
(Cornell) care Block-Pollock Co., Cincinnati, 0. 
(Cornell) 600 West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, Ind. 
(Colgate) Pueblo, Colo. 

(O. W. U.) University School, Cleveland, O. 
(0. S. U.) 518 East Broad Street, Columbus, 0. 
(Amherst) Findlay, 0. 
(O. W. U.) London, 0. 

(Michigan) 411 Black Hawk Bank Bldg., Waterloo, Iowa. 
(Wesleyan) Second Street, Marietta, 0. 
(Nebraska) 64 Illinois Street, Chicago Heights, 111. 
(Illinois) Martel, 0. 

(Michigan) 436 West Eldorado Street, Decatur, 111. 
(Cincinnati) Granville, O. 
(Denison) Batavia, 0. 

(Miami, Wisconsin) 617 Rialto Building, Kansas City, Mo. 
(Princeton) University School, Cleveland, O. 
(Minnesota) 448 McKnight Building, Minneapolis, Minn. 
(Iowa) Oklahoma City, Okla. 
(Wooster) Delaware, 0. 

(0. S. U.) Williamson Building, Cleveland, 0. 
(Springfield Training School) Cedar Falls, Iowa. 
(Illinois) Central High School, St. Louis, Mo. 
(Oberlin) Rayen High School, Youngstown, 0. 
(Michigan) Ada, 0. 

(Michigan) care Detroit Twist Drill Co., Detroit, Mich. 
(Harvard) 623 West Third Street, Canton, 0. 
(Mt. Union, Harvard) 307 Williamson Bldg, Cleveland, 0. 
(Miami) Chamber of Commerce Building, Cleveland, O. 
Manual Arts High School, Los Angeles, Cal. 
(Bucknell) 1033 Society for Savings Building, Cleveland, 0. 
(Cornell) Engineer's Office, M. C. Railway, Detroit, Mick. 
(Indiana) Presbyterian Hospital, Chicago, 111. 
1102 Cedar Avenue, Cleveland, 0. 
(Iowa) Sigma Nu House, Iowa City, Iowa. 
(Dickinson) 53 West Fourth Avenue, Columbus, 0. 
(W. P. U.) 4208 Canton Avenue, Cleveland, O. 



182 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



Thomson, Andrew, 
Tighe, Charles P., 
Turner, Leigh C, 
Tyler, Edgar J.. 
Van Voorhees. F.. 
Walbridge, Geo. B., 
Waugbtel, S. Hi, 
Weaver. Harrison, 
White, E. A., 
White, Earl A., 
Wineman, A. G., 
Wood, J. P., 
W T ooley, Thomas R., 
Wrenn, Everts, 
Yeckley, E. D., 
Yoder, H. O., 
Young, A. E., 
Young, E. P., 
Zinn. Fred H., 



(Illinois) 2958 East 81st Street, Chicago. 

(Indiana Univ.) Odd Fellows' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 

(Dartmouth) 1157 Pierce Building, St. Louis, Mo. 

(W. P. U.) 317 Electric Building, Cleveland, O. 

(Denison) Granville, 0. 

(Lafayette) 652 Railway Exchange, Chicago. 

(Lebanon) Marietta, O. 

(0. W. U.) Miamisburg, 0. 

(Illinois) 417 Sterling Court, Madison, Wis. 

(Illinois) Antioch, 111. 

(North Dakota) Univ. of No. Dakota, Grand Forks, N. D. 

(O. U.) Athens, O. 

(Michigan) 201 22nd Street, Milwaukee, Wis. 

(Harvard) 511 People's Gas Building, Chicago, 111. 

(Penn State) 147 West Rayen Avenue, Youngstown, 0. 

(O. W. U.) 1023 Schofield Building, Cleveland. O. 

(Conn. Wesleyan) Oxford, 0. 

(Cornell) Frick Annex, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

(Kenyon) Sandusky, 0. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



183 



SOUTHERN LIST. 

Names suggested by- 
Prof. W. L. Dudley, Yauderbilt University. 
Prof. Riggs, Clemson College. 
Prof. W. A. Lambeth, Univ. of Virginia, Chairman. 



Armstrong, Richard, 
Baker, A. F., 
Barry, C. M., 
Benet, Christie, 
Bocock, J. B., 
Cook, William T., 
Counselman, J. S., 
Creeson, C. C, 
Crafts, Fred A., 
Donnelly, Chas. F., 
Dyer, B. H., 
Gass, S. J., 
Graham, R. C, 
Haligan, J. E., 
Heald, Wister M., 
Hoffman, A. C, 
Holland, J. G., 
Jackson, Ellis L., 

Jennings, Geo. A., 
Johnson, Branch, 
Johnson, Hammond, 
Kern, H. A., 
Kirby, Thomas, 
Lambert, George M., 
Land, E. S., 
McGeorge, H. L., 
Nielson, Fred K., 
Phillips, Henry D., 
Prince, Percy S., 
Shaughnessy, F. J., 
Tan Surdam, H. E., 
Walker, Bradley, 
Watkins, J. F., 
Williams, C. R., 



(Yale) Hampton, Ya. 

(U. of Kentucky) Versailles, Ky. 

(Georgetown) Chamberlaine Building, Norfolk, Va. 

(Virginia) Columbia, S. C. 

(Georgetown) Blacksburg, Ya. 

(Springfield) Davidson College, Davidson, N. C. 

(V. P. I.) 1611 South 13th Street, Birmingham, Ala. 

(Princeton) Alamo Bank Building, San Antonio. Texas. 

(Geo. Washington) Eng. Com. of D. C, Washington. D. C. 

(Holy Cross) 288 loth Street, S.E., Washington, D. C. 

(Texas) 1014 Scanlon Building, Houston, Texas. 

(Lehigh) Eng. Com. of D. C, Washington, D. C. 

(Virginia) Norton, Ya. 

(Mass. Agri.) University Place, Baton Rouge, La. 

(Virginia) Lynchburg, Ya. 

(Chicago) Tulane University, New Orleans, La. 

Edgefield, S. C. 

(Baltimore City Coll.) Box 12, Hotel Chamberlain, Old 

Point. Ya. 
(Bucknell) Sistersville, W. Ya. 
(Virginia) 83 Granby Street, Norfolk, Ya. 
(Virginia) Haddington Building, Norfolk, Va. 
(Randolph) Jackson, Miss. 

(Georgetown) 203 I Street, Washington, D. C. 
Dairy Division, U. S. Dept. of Agri., Washington, D. C. 
(Annapolis) Dept. of Eng. Construction, Washington, D. C. 
Edwards House Building, Jackson, Miss. 
(Nebraska) Department of State, Washington, D. €. 
(U. of the South) Atlanta Ga. 

(Tufts) care Louisiana Industrial Inst., Ruston, La. 
(Notre Dame) Roanoke, Ya. 
(Wesleyan) Fort Bliss, Texas. 
(Virginia) 22 Noel Building, Nashville, Tenn. 
(Virginia) 607 McDuffy Street, Anderson, S. C. 
(Virginia) 604 First National Bank, Roanoke, Ya. 

For the convenience and security of Colored Institutions of the North and 

South, the following competent officials have been approved by the Central 
Board on Officials. 

Henderson, E. B., (Sargent )M Street High School, Washington. D. C. 

Robinson, M. P., (Oberlin) 406 U Street. Washington, D. C. 

Savoy, A. K., 2008 17th Street, Washington, D. C. 

Wilkinson, G. C, (Oberlin) M. Street High School, Washington, D. C. 



184 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



MISSOURI VALLEY CONFERENCE OFFICIALS. 

This list of officials is compiled and published for the convenience of 
Non-Conference as well as Conference institutions. Whenever so requested, 
the committee will be glad to appoint competent foot ball officials for games 
between Non-Conference institutions. Managers and coaches are urged to 
send to the committee reports showing the quality of work done by officials 
on this list. 

COMMITTEE ON OFFICIALS. 

Dr. F. H. EWERHARDT, Washington University; 

Prof. C. E. McCLUNG, University of Kansas; 

.Or. R. G. CLAPP, Chairman, University of Nebraska, 



Allen, Forrest, 
Anderson, Isadore, 
Berkstresser, Allen, 
Bond, J., 
Bonnifield, A. D., 
Brewer, C. L.. 
Bryant, G. W., 
Burcham, Dr. Thos., 
Burroughs, W. G., 
Carlson, J. L., 
Carlson. Russel, 
Cayou. John, 
Chalmers, Andy, 
Clausen, E. W., 
Connctt, William, 
Cornell, Fred, 
Curtis, J. S., 
Driver. W. L., 
Duback, Otto, 
Eager. E. O., 
Eby, M. C, 
Erwin, C. W., 
Evans. Robert, 
Ewing, II. W., 
Falvey. James, 
Finger. S. W., 
Frank, Owen, 
Gibson. J. A., 
Gordon. W. C, 
Graham. Gus. 
Graham. W. A,, 
Green, W. O.. 



MISSOURI VALLEY LIST. 

(Kansas) Kansas City. Mo. 

(Missouri) Post-Graduate Hospital, Kansas City, Mo. 

(Morningside) Fairfield, Iowa. 

(Kansas) Lawrence. Kan. 

(Iowa Wes.) Great Western Life Ins. Co., Kansas City, Mo. 

(Wisconsin) Columbia. Mo. 

(Princeton) Cedar Rapids. Iowa. 

(Drake) Des Moines, Iowa (Fleming Building). 

(Illinois) Edwardsville, 111. 

(Kansas) care of Linthrop. Kansas City, Mo. 

(Drake) Des Moines, Iowa. 

(Carlisle) Washington University, St. Louis, Mo. 

(Lafayette) Des Moines, Iowa. 

(Missouri) Atchison. Kan. 

(Virginia) Third National Bank Building, St. Louis, Mo. 

(Indiana) South 11th Street, Lincoln, Neb. 

(Michigan) Iola Cement Co., Iola, Kan. 

(Missouri) Washburn College, Topeka, Kan. 

Central High School, Kansas City, Mo. 

(Nebraska) Lincoln, Neb. 

(Iowa) Iowa City. Iowa. 

(Chicago) 411 Funke Building, Lincoln, Neb. 

(Drake) Des Moines. Iowa. 

(Nebraska) Morningside College, Sioux City, Iowa. 

(Washington) 128G Goodfellow Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

(Chicago) Mount Vernon, Iowa. 

(Nebraska) Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln. Neb. 

(Harvard) Columbia. Mo. 

(Missouri Valley College) Marshall. Mo. 

(Grinnell) Fleming Building, Des Moines, Iowa. 

(Iowa) Des Moines, Iowa. 

(Denison) Smith Academy, St. Louis, Mo. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



185 



Griffith, J. L., 
Grover, J. C, 
Hadden. Harry, 
Hamilton. W. O., 
Harvey, J. B., 
Havens, Roy, 
Hobbs, S. W., 
Hoffman, Arthur, 
Hoopes, L. L., 
Hubbard, Homer, 
Hyland, Mark W., 
Johnson, Willis, 
Jones, Nyle W., 
Jones, T. IL, 
Kearnes, W. A., 
Kennedy, A. R., 
Krause, Walter, 
Law. F. W., 
Lofgren, Gus, 
Lowman, Guy S., 
Maunal, T. H., 
Masker, James, 
McBride, C. E., 
McBride, Dr. W. L., 
Matters, Tate, 
McCoy, 

McCreary, B. L., 
McCreight, George, 
McGovern, John, 
McKay, J. G., 
Mosse, A'., 

Naismith, Dr. James, 
Nee, D.M.. 
Nelson, Henry, 
Nipher. Edward, 
Page, Pat. 
Pleasant, Carl, 
Porter, Boy, 
Quigley, E. C, 
Rathbone, Harvy, 
Rathburn. C. L., 
Reed, A. G., 
Reed, H. C 
Reilly, Joseph, 
Ristine, Carl, 
Robinson, Bradbury, 
Rogers, Raymond, 
Rothgeb, Claude, 
Rouse, Carl, 



(Beloit) Des Moines, Iowa. 

(Washington) Kansas City, Mo. 

(Michigan) 1157 East 47th Street, Chicago, 111. 

(William Jewell) Lawrence, Kan. 

(Nebraska) Y.M.C.A., Omaha, Neb. 

(Drake) Des Moines, Iowa. 

(Iowa) Des Moines, Iowa. 

(Drake) Des Moines, Iowa. 

Westport High School, Kansas City, Mo. 

(Ames) Ames, Iowa. 

(Iowa) Tama, Iowa. 

(St. Louis University) Globe-Democrat, St. Louis, Mo. 

(Iowa) Iowa City, Iowa. 

(Wisconsin) 403 Wolvin Building, Duluth, Minn. 

(Bellevue) Y.M.C.A., Fremont, Neb. 

(U. of P.) Lawrence, Kan. 

5252 Vernon Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

(Ames) Oskaloosa, Iowa. 

(Nebraska) Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb. 

(Springfield Training School) Manhattan, Kan. 

St. Louis, Mo. 

(Northwestern) Kansas City A.C., Kansas City, Mo. 

(Missouri Vail. Coll.) Kansas City Star, Kansas City, Mo. 

(Chicago), Kansas City, Mo. 

(Nebraska) National Bank Building, Omaha, Neb. 

(Drake) Knoxville, Iowa. 

(Oklahoma) Kansas City, Mo. 

(Drake) Des Moines, Iowa. 

(Minnesota) Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 

(Westminster) National Bank Building, Omaha, Neb. 

(Kansas) Lawrence, Kan. 

Lawrence, Kan. 

(Missouri) 232 E. Pacific Street, Springfield. Mo. 

(Washington) 965 Hamilton Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

(Washington) Kirkwood, Mo. 

(.Chicago) Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, 111. 

(Kansas) Burlington, Kan. 

(Maine) Ames, Iowa. 

(Kansas) St. Mary's College, St. Mary's, Kan. 

(Nebraska) Lincoln, Neb. 

(Beloit) Beatrice, Neb. 

(Michigan) Waterloo, Iowa. 

(Kansas) Kansas City, Kan. 

Kansas City A.C., Kansas City, Mo. 

(Missouri) Lexington, Mo. 

(St. Louis University) St. Louis, Mo. 

(Springfield Training School) Des Moines, Iowa. 

(Illinois) Fort Collins, Colo. 

(Kansas) Kansas City, Kan. 



G„ 



186 

Ruppert, Lewis, 
Sampson, P. B., 
Scherer, L. D., 
Seymour, R. F., 

Sherwin, 
Shonka, Sylvia, 
Sihier. Alfred, 
Siler. R. W., 
Sinnock, 
Stephenson. W 
Stiehm, E. 0., 
Stuart, Ted, 
Taylor, Charles, 
Thomas. Homer L. 
Thompson, Robert 
Tidd, Harry. 
Touton, L. L., 
Turner, L. C, 
Umbarger, R. B., 
Van Liew, John, 
Van Meter, Neil, 
Wade, Frank 
Walker, M., 
Williams, S. C, 
Williams, C. L., 
Winters, F. J., 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



(Miami and Wisconsin) 505 Lang Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. 

(Springfield Training School) Emporia, Kan. 

(Chicago) Baldwin, Kan. 

(Springfield Training School) Iowa Teachers' College, Cedar 

Falls, Iowa. 
(Dartmouth) Lawrence, Kan. 
(Nebraska) David City, Neb. 

(Washington) 6154 McPherson Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 
(Illinois) Central High School, St. Louis, Mo. 
(Illinois) Des Moines, Iowa. 

(Drake) Box 122, U. P. Station, Des Moines. Iowa. 
(Wisconsin) Lincoln, Neb. 
(Michigan) Golden, Colo. 
(Drake) Guthrie Center, Iowa. 

(Purdue) Manual Training High School, St. Louis, Mo. 
(Drake) Des Moines, Iowa. 
(Missouri) Columbia, Mo. 

(Lawrence) Central High School, Kansas City, Mo. 
(Dartmouth) 6019 McPherson Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 
(Yale) Iowa National Bank, Des Moines, Iowa. 
(Grinnell) Des Moines, Iowa. 
(Drake) Des Moines, Iowa. 
(Indiana) Fredonia, Kan. 
(Knox) Central High School, St. Louis, Mo. 
(Iowa) Ames, Iowa. 
(Indiana) Topeka, Kan. 
(Nebraska) Warrensburg, Mo. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



187 



Scores of Intercollegiate Series, 
1873 to 1912 



Compiled by Parke H. Davis. 



1887— Dart. 52; Am. 0. 
1888— Dart. 40; Am. 0. 
1889— Dart. 60; Am. 6. 
1890— Am. 4; Dart. 0. 
1891— Dart. 14; Am. 14. 
1892— Am. 30; Dart. 2. 
1893— Dart. 34 ; Am. 0. 
1894— Dart. 30; Am. 0. 



1884 — Wms. 

Wms. 
1885— Wms. 

Wms. 
1886— Am. 6 

Wms. 
1888— Wms. 
1889— Wms. 
1890— Wms. 
1891— Wms. 



15; Am. 2. 
11 ; Am. 0. 
57; Am. 0. 
18; Am. 15. 
; Wms. 4. 
30; Am. 0. 
53; Am. 0. 
10; Am. 10. 
6; Am. 0. 
0; Am. 0. 



AMHERST— DARTMOUTH. 
1895— Dart. 20; Am. 0. 
1896— Dart. 32; Am. 0. 
1897— Dart. 54; Am. 0. 
1898— Dart. 64; Am. 6. 
1902— Am. 12; Dart. 6. 
1903 — Dart. 18; Am. 0. 
1904— Dart. 35, Am. 4. 
1905— Dart. 0; Am. 0. 

AMHERST— WILLIAMS. 

1892 — Am. 60; Wms. 0. 
1893— Wms. 30; Am. 12. 
1894— Wms. 34; Am. 10. 
1895 — Am. 16; Wms. 4. 
1896— Am. 6; Wms. 4. 
1897— Wms. 6; Am. 6. 
1898— Am. 16; Wms. 5. 
1899— Wms. 38; Am. 0. 
1900— Wms. 16; Am. 5. 
1901— Wms. 21; Am. 5. 



1906— Dart. 4; Am. 0. 
1907— Dart. 15; Am, 10. 
1908— Dart. 17; Am. 0. 
1909— Dart. 12; Am. 0. 
1910— Dart. 15; Am. 3. 
1911— Dart. 18; Am. 6. 



1904— Am. 22; Wms. 6. 
1905— Am. 17; Wms. 0. 
1906— Wms. 0; Am. 0. 
1907— Wms. 26; Am. 6. 
1908— Am. 4; Wms. 0. 
1909— Wms. 17; Am. 0. 
1910— Am. 9; Wms. 0. 
1911— Wms. 8; Am. 0. 



NOTES. — Intercollegiate foot ball, both In America and England, dates 
from the contest between Princeton and Rutgers, November 6, 1869, played- 
under an original set of rules. In 1873 delegates from Princeton, Rutgers 
and Yale drew up a code based upon the Association rules. This code was 
known as the "Rules of 1873," and under it the first Princeton- Yale game, 
in 1873, was played. In 1875 representatives of Harvard and Yale drew up 
a code, known at the time as the "Concessionary Rules," which was based 
partially upon the Rugby Union rules. Under these rules the first Harvard-Yale 
game was played, 1875. the score being computed by goals alone. The following 
year, November 26. 1876, Columbia, Harvard, Princeton and Yale drafted an 
elaborate set of rules, largely following the Rugby Union Rules which, with 
the many changes introduced since that time, is the present intercollegiate 
code. In the original intercollegiate rules of 1876 Rule 7 provided: "A 
match shall be decided by a majority of touchdowns; a go^l shall be equal 
to four touchdowns, but in case of a tie a goal kicked from a touchdown 
shall take precedence over four touchdowns." In the Harvard- Yale and 
Princeton-Yale games of 1876 and 1877 Yale exacted a special rule that the 
score should be computed by goals alone, following the English rule therefor. 
In 1881 the following rule was adopted: "In case of a tie a goal kicked 
from a touchdown shall take precedence over a goal otherwise kicked. If 
the game still remains a tie, the side which makes four or more safeties 
less than their opponents shall win the game." In 1882 the rule was added: 
"In scoring, four touchdown's shall take precedence over a goal kicked from 
the field; two safeties shall be equal to a touchdown." Numerical scoring 
was adopted in 1883 as follows: safety 1. touchdown 2, goal from touch- 
down 4, goal from the field 5. These values were changed the following year 
as follows: safety 2, touchdown 4, goal from touchdown 2. In 1897 the 
value of a touchdown was increased to 5 points, and the value of a goal 
following a touchdown was reduced to 1 point. In 1904 the value of a goal 
from the field was reduced to 4 points, and in 1909 to 3 points. In 1912 the 
value of a touchdown was increased to 6 points. 




1, E. B. Ingraham, Mgr. ; 2, Probst; 3, Ayling; 4, Camp; o, Reeve; 6, EE. 
Helmstetter? Asst. Mgr.; 7, Kallet; 8, Hilnnger; 9, P. D. Fogg, Cat.; 10, 
Ansley; 11, Day; 12, Smith; 13, Castle. 

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY. 




1 Coon- 2 Dittemore. Coach: 3. Higgins, Mgr.: 4. Dn Bois; o, Williams 
6 Weatherbvl 7. Bloss; 8, Hopkins; 9, Mabey; 10, Wright; 11, Freeman 
12 Bobinlon; 13, Trombridge; 14, McClure; 15, Brainard; 16, Lily; 17, Cady 
18', Miller, Capt. ; 19, Hopkins. 

NEW YORK STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, ALFRED, N. Y, 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



189 



1877— Ex. 0; And. 0. 
1878— And. 22; Ex. 0. 
1879— Ex. 18; And. 0. 
1880— Ex. 8; And. 8. 
38S1— And. 6; Ex. 0. 
1882— And. 12; Ex. 0. 
1883— And. 15; Ex. 6. 
1884— And. 11; Ex. 8. 
1885— Ex. 33; And. 11. 
1886— Ex. 26; And. 0. 
1887— Ex. 44; And. 4. 
1888— And. 10; Ex. 0. 



1901— La. 15; Ark. 0. 
1906— Ark. 6; La. 6. 



1903— Texas 15; Ark. 0. 
1904 — No game. 
1905— Texas 4; Ark. 0. 

1890 — Navy 24; Army 0. 
1891— Army 32; Navy 16. 
1892 — Navy 12; Army 4. 
1893— Navy 6; Army 4. 
1899 — Army 17; Navy 5. 
1900— Navy 11; Army 7. 

1893— Yale 28; Army 0. 
1S94— Yale 12; Army 5. 
1895--Yale 28; Army 8. 
1896— Yale 16; Army 2. 
1897— Yale 6; Army 6. 
1898— Yale 10; Army 0. 
1899— Yale 24; Army 0. 

1889— Bow. 62; Bates 0. 
1893— Bow. 54; Bates 0. 
1894— Bow. 26; Bates 0. 
1895 — Bow. 22; Bates 6. 
1896— Bow. 22; Bates 0. 
1897— Bates 10; Bow. 6. 
1898 — Bates 6; Bow. 0. 

1893— Colby 4; Bates 0. 
1894— Bates 14; Colby 0. 
Bates 10; Colby 8. 
1895— Bates 10; Colby 0. 
1896— Colby 8; Bates 0. 
1897— Bates 6; Coly 6. 
1898— Bates 17; Colby 0. 

1893— Bates 18; Me. 0. 

Bates 52; Me. 6. 
1895— Bates 20; Me. 0. 

Bates- 18; Me. 0. 
1896— Me. 24; Bates 0. 

Bates 4; Me. 4. 
1897— Bates 5; Me. 4. 

Bates 8 ; Me. 6. 



ANDOVER— EXETER. 

1889— No game. 
1890— And. 16; Ex. 0. 
1891— And. 26; Ex. 10. 
1892— Ex. 28; And. 18. 
1893— Ex. 26; And. 10. 
1894 — No game. 
1895 — No game. 
1896— And. 28; Ex. 0. 
1897— Ex. 18; And. 14. 
1898— Ex. 0; And. 0. 
1899— And. 17; Ex. 0. 
1900— Ex. 10; And. 0. 

ARKANSAS— LOUISIANA. 
1908— La. 36; Ark. 4. 
1909— Ark. 16; La. 6. 

ARKANSAS— TEXAS. 
1906— Texas 11 ; Ark. 0. 
1907— Texas 26; Ark. 6. 
1908 — Texas 21; Ark. 0. 

ARMY— NAVY. 

1901 — Armv 11; Navy 5. 
1902— Army 22 ; Navy 8. 
1903 — Army 40; Navy 5. 
1904 — Army 11; Navy 0. 
1905 — Army 6; Navy 6. 

ARMY— YALE. 
1900— Yale 18; Army 0. 
1901— Yale 5; Army 5. 
1902— Yale 6; Army 6. 
1903— Yale 17; Army 5. 
1904— Army 11; Yale 6. 
1905— Yale 20; Army 0. 

BATES— BOWDOIN. 
1899 — Bow. 16; Bates 6. 
1901— Bates 11; Bow. 0. 
1902— Bates 16; Bow. 0. 
1903— Bow. 11; Bates 5. 
1904 — Bow. 12; Bates 6. 
1905— Bow. 6; Bates 0. 

BATES— COLBY. 

1899— Bates 12; Colby 0. 
1900— Bates 17; Colby 6. 
1901— Bates 17; Colby 6. 
1902— Colbv 15; Bates 0. 
1903— Colby 11; Bates 0. 
1904— Bates 23; Colby 0. 

BATES— MAINE. 
1898— Bates 36; Me. 0. 

Bates 34; Me. 0. 
1899— Bates 16; Me. 0. 

Bates 26; Me. 0. 
1900— Bates 26; Me. 0. 

Bates 8; Me. 0. 
1901— Me. 6; Bates 0. 

Me. 17; Bates 0. 
1902— Bates 6; Me. 0. 



1901— Ex. 5; And. 0. 
1902— And. 29; Ex. 17. 
1903— Ex. 14; And. 11. 
1904— Ex. 35; And. 10. 
1905— And. 28; Ex. 0. 
1906— And. 6; Ex. 0. 
1907— And. 9; Ex. 6. 
1908— And. 12; Ex. 0. 
1909— And. 3; Ex. 0. 
1910— And. 21; Ex. 0. 
1911— And. 23; Ex. 5. 



1910— Ark. 54; La. 0. 
1911— Ark. 11; La. 0. 



1909-10— No games. 
1911— Texas 12; Ark. 0. 



1906 — Navy 10; Army 0. 
1907 — Navy 6; Army 0. 
1908— Army 6; Navy 4. 
1910— Navy 3 ; Army 0. 
1911— Navy 3; Army 0. 



1906— Yale 10; Army 6^ 
1907— Yale 0; Army 0. 
1908 — Yale 6; Army 0. 
1909— Yale 17; Army 0. 
1910— Army 9; Yale 3. 
1911— Army 6; Yale 0. 



1906 — Bates 6; Bow. 0. 
1907— Bow. 6; Bates 5. 
1908 — Bates 5; Bow. 0. 
1909 — Bow. 6; Bates 0. 
1910— Bow. 6; Bates 6. 
1911— Bow. 11; Bates 0. 



1905— Bates 28 ; Colby 0. 
1906— Bates 6; Colby 0. 
1907— Colby 5; Bates 0. 
1908— Colby 6; Bates 0. 
1909— Colby 11; Bates 3. 
1911— Colby 14; Bates 0. 



1903— Me. 17; Bates 0. 
1904— Bates 6; Me. 0. 
1905— Bates 0; Me. 0. 
1906 — Bates 0; Me. 0. 
1907— Bates 6: Me. 6. 
1908— Me. 6; Bates 0. 
1909— Me. 15; Bates 6. 
1910— Bates 10; Me. 0. 
1911— Bates 5; Me. 0. 




I, Carmody; 2. Donavan; 3, Volk; 4, Colleary; 5, Gilson; 6, Metivier; 7, 
Collins; 8, O'Brien; 9, Craig, Mgr. ; 10, Larkin, Coach; 11, Faherty, Grad- 
uate Mgr. ; 12, McDonnell, Asst. Mgr.; 13, Tobin; 14, Davitt; 15, Whalen; 
16, Monahan; 17, Pickett; 18, Joy, Capt. ; 19, Ostergren; 20, Kenneth" 21, 
McCabe; 22, Quinn; 23, Cahill. 

HOLY CROSS COLLEGE, WORCESTER, MASS. 




1, Slavin, Coach: 2, Claffey; 8, Whalen; 4. Squire; 5, Buckmiller: 6, Donald; 
7. Stack, Mgr.; 8, Zwick; 9, O'Brien; 10, Sefton; 11. Stankanl; 12, Mayforth; 
13, Walker, Capt,; 14, Macintosh: 15, Pike. 

UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT, BURLINGTON, VT. 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



191 



1892— Bow. 56; Colby 0. 

Bow. 22; Colby 4. 
189^— Bow. 42; Colby 4. 

Bow. 40; Colby 0. 
1894— Bow. 30; Colby 0. 
1895— Bow. 5 ; Colby 0. 

Bow. 6; Colbv 0. 
1896— Bow. 12; Colby 0. 

Bow. .6; Colby'6. 



BOWDOIN— COLBY. 

1897— Colby 16; Bow. 4. 

Bow. 0; Colby 0. 
1898— Bow. 24; Colbv 0. 

Bow. 17; Colby 0. 
1899— Colby 6 ; Bow. 0. 
1900 — Bow. 68; Colbv 0. 
1901— Colbv 12 ; Bow'. 0. 
1902— Colby 16 ; Bow. 6. 
1903— Colby 11; Bow. 0. 



1904— Bow. 52 ; Colbv 0. 
1905— Bow. 5; Colby 0. 
1906— Bow. 0; Colby 0. 
1907— Bow. 5; Colby 0. 
1908— Bow. 9; Colby 6. 
1909— Colby 12; Bow. 5. 
1910— Bow. 6; Colby 5. 
1911— Bow. 0; Colby 0. 



1893— Bow. 12; Me. 10. 
1896— Bow. 12; Me. 6. 
1898 — Bow. 20; Me. 0. 
1899— Bow. 10; Me. 0. 
1900 — Bow. 38; Me. 0. 
1901— Me. 22; Bow. 5. 



BOWDOIN— MAINE. 
1902— Me. 11; Bow. 0. 
1903— Me. 16; Bow. 0. 
1904— Bow. 22; Me. 5. 
1905 — Me. 18; Bow. 0. 
1906— Bow. 6; Me. 0. 
1907— Bow. 34; Me. 5. 



1908— Bow. 10; Me. 0. 
1909— Bow. 22; Me. 0. 
1910— Bow. 0; Me. 0. 
1911— Me. 15; Bow. 0. 



1894— Br. 20; Dart. 4. 
1895— Br. 10; Dart. 5. 
1896— Br. 10; Dart. 10. 
1897 — No game. 
1898— Br. 12; Dart. 0. 



BROWN— DARTMOUTH. 

1899— Br. 16; Dart. 5. 1904— Dart. 12; Br. 5. 

1900— Br. 17; Dart. 5. 1905— Dart. 24; Br. 6. 

1901— Dart. 22; Br. 0. 1906— Br. 23; Dart. 0- 

1902— Dart. 12; Br. 6. 1907 to 1911— No games. 

1903— Dart. 62; Br. 0. 



BROWN— PENNSYLVANIA. 



1895— U. of P. 12; Br. 0. 
1896— U. of P. 16; Br. 0. 
1897— U. of P. 40; Br. 0. 
1898— U. of P. 18; Br. 0. 
1899— U. of P. 6; Br. 0. 
1900— U. of P. 12; Br. 0. 



1901— U. of P. 26; Br. 0. 
1902— Br. 15: U. of P. 6. 
1903— U. of P. 30; Br. 0. 
1904— U. of P. 6; Br. 0. 
1905— U. of P. 8; Br. 6. 
1906— U. of P. 14; Br. 0. 



1907— U. of P. 11; Br. 0. 
1908— U. of P. 12; Br. 0. 
1909— U. of P. 13; Br. 5. 
1910— U. of P. 20; Br. 0. 
1911— Br. 6; U. of P. 0. 



BROWN— YAJLE. 
1880 — Yale, 8 goals, 5 touchdowns; Brown, 0. 



1893 — Yale 18; Brown 0. 
1894— Yale 28; Brown 0. 

Yale 12; Brown 0. 
1895 — Yale 4; Brown 0. 

Yale 6: Brown 6. 
1896— Yale 18; Brown 0. 

Yale 18 ; Brown 6. 



1897— Yale 18; Brown 14. 
1898— Yale 22; Brown 6. 
1902— Yale 10 ; Brown 0. 
1904 — Yale 22; Brown 0. 
1905 — Yale 11; Brown 0. 
1906 — Yale 5 ; Brown 0. 



1907— Yale 22; Brown 0. 
1908— Yale 10; Brown 10. 
1909— Yale 23; Brown 0. 
1910— Brown 21; Yale 0. 
1911— Yale 15 ; Brown 0. 



1891— Ober. 10; Case 0. 
1892 — No game. 
1893— Case 22 ; Ober. 8. 
1894— Ober. 20; Case 6. 
1896— Ober. 34; Case 0. 
1897— Ober. 16; Case 10. 
1898 — Ober. 33; Case 0. 



CASE— OBERLIN. 
1899— Case 11; Ober. 0. 
1900— Ober. 10; Case 0. 
1901— Ober. 33; Case 0. 
1902— Case 16; Ober. 0. 
1903— Case 16; Ober. 5. 
1904— Case 16; Ober. O. 
1905— Case 23; Ober. 0. 



1906 — Ober. 5: Case 0. 
1907— Ober. 22; Case 0. 
1908— Ober. 18; Case 10„ 
1909 — Ober. 0; Case 0. 
1910 — Ober. 6; Case 0. 
1911— Ober. 6; Case 5. 



1891— Res. 22; Case 0. 
1893— Case 34; Res. 0. 
1894— Res. 24; Case 0. 
1896— Case 12; Res. 10. 
1897— Case 14; Res. 0. 
1898— Res. 29; Case 0. 
1899— Res. 16; Case 5. 



CASE— RESERVE. 
1900— Res. 12; Case 0. 
1901— Case 6: Res. 5. 
1902 — Case 20; Res. 0. 
1903— Case 56; Res. 0. 
1904— Case 22; Res. 0. 
1905— Case 34; Res. 0. 
1906— Res. 10; Case 3. 



1907— Res. 11; Case 4. 
1908— Res. 11: Case 7. 
1909 — Res. 5; Case 5. 
1910 — Case 3; Res. 0. 
1911— Case 9; Res. 5. 




1, R. G. Gettell, Coach; 2, Kinney; 3, John Moore; 4, James Moore; ^Jitz- 
patrick; 6, D. Howell; 7, Humphrey, Mgr. ; 8, Cook; 9, Ahem, 10, Collett, 
11 C Howell, Capt. ; 12, Bleecker; 13, Hudson; 14, Lawlor. 
TRINITY COLLEGE, HARTFORD, CONN 

Randall & Blaekmore, Photo. 




1 Smith; 2, Burnett; 3, Martin; 4, Murry; 5, Kent; 6, Wingard; 7 Hussey; 
8, Davis 9 McNeil 10, Shepard; 11, Bernheisel; 12 Donf ue; IB^ggg 
14 Crowell; 15, Billow; 16, Carleton; 17, Sawyer; 18, Baker, 19, vvnitney 
20,' Bryant; 21, Gulliver; 22, Parker; 23. Smith; 24, Cleaves; 2o, Smiley 
26, Amapon; 27, Hamel. 

UNIVERSITY OF MAINE, ORONO, ME. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE, 



193 



CARLISLE— PENNSYLVANIA. 



1895— U. of P. 36; C. 0. 
1896— U. of P. 21; C. 0. 
1897— U. of P. 20; C. 10. 
1898— U. of P. 35; C. 5. 
1899— C. 16; U. of P. 5. 
1900— U. of P. 16; C. 6. 



1901— U. of P. 16; C. 14. 
1902— C. 5; U. of P. 0. 
1903— C. 16; U. of P. 6. 
1904— U. of P. 18; a 0. 
1905— U. of P. 6; C. 0. 
1906— C. 24; U. of P. 6. 



1007— C. 26; U. of P. 6. 
1908— U. of P. 6; C. 6. 
1909— U. of P. 24; C. 6. 
1910— U. of P. 17; C. 5. 
1911— C 1ft-- U. of P. 0. 



1899— Chic. 17; Cor. 5. 
1908— Chic. 6; Cor. 6. 



CHICAGO— CORNELL. 

1909— Chic. 6; Cor. 6. 
1910— Chic. 18; Cor. 0. 



1911— Chic. 6; Cor. 0. 



1892— Chic. 10; 111. 4. 
1893— Chic. 10; 111. 6. 
1896—111. 24; Chic. 0. 
1897— Chic. 18; 111. 12. 
1901—111. 24; Chic. 0. 



CHICAGO— ILLINOIS. 
1902— Chic. 6; 111. 0. 
1903— Chic. 18; 111. 0. 
1904— Chic. 6; 111. 6. 
1905— Chic. 44; III. 0. 
1906— Chic. 63; 111. 0. 



1907— Chic. 42; 111. 6. 
1908— Chic. 11; 111. 6. 
1909— Chic. 14; 111. 8. 
1910—111. 3; Chic. 0. 
1911— Chic. 24; 111. 0. 



1892— Mich. 18; Chic. 10. 
1893— Chic. 10; Mich. 6. 

Mich. 28; Chic. 10. 
1894— Mich. 6; Chic. 4. 
1895— Mich. 12; Chic. 0. 
1896— Chic. 7; Mich. 6. 



1895— Minn. 10; Chic. 6. 
1899— Chic. 29; Minn. 0. 
1900— Chic. 6; Minn. 6. 



CHICAGO— MICHIGAN. 

1897— Chic. 21; Mich. 12. 
1898— Mich. 12; Chic. 11. 
1899 — No game. 
1900— Chic. 15; Mich. 6. 
1901— Mich. 22; Chic. 0. 



1902— Mich. 21; Chic. 0. 
1903— Mich. 28; Chic. 0. 
1904— Mich. 22; Chic. 12. 
1905— Chic. 2; Mich. 0. 
1906 to 1911— No games. 



CHICAGO— MINNESOTA. 

1906— Minn. 4; Chic. 2. 1909— Minn. 20; Chic. 6. 



1907— Chic. 18; 
1908— Chic. 



Minn. 12. 
Minn. 0. 



1910— Minn. 24; Chic. O. 
1911— Minn. 30; Chic. 0. 



CHICAGO— NORTHWESTERN. 



1892— Chic. 0; N.W. 0. 

N.W. 6, Chic. 4. 
1893— Chic. 12; N.W. 6. 

Chic. 6; N.W. 6. 

N.W. 28; Chic. 10. 
1894— Chic. 46; N.W. 0. 

Chic. 36; N.W. 0. 



1895— N.W. 22; Chic. 6. 

Chic. 6; N.W. 0. 
1896— N.W. 46; Chic. 6. 

Chic. 18; N.W. 6. 
1897— Chic. 21; N.W. 6. 
1898— Chic. 34; N.W. 5. 
1899— Chic. 76; N.W. 0. 
1900— N.W. 5; Chic. 0. 



1901— N.W. 6: 
1902— Chic. 12 
1903— Chic. 0; 
1904— Chic. 32 
1905— Chic. 32 
1909— Chic. 34 
1910— Chic. 10 
1911— Chic. 9; 



Chic. 5. 
; N.W. 0. 
N.W. 0. 
; N.W. 0. 
: N.W. 0. 
: N.W. 0. 
; N.W. 0. 
N.W. 3. 



1892— Pur. 38; Chic. 0. 
1893— Pur. 20; Chic. 10. 
1894— Pur. 10; Chic. 6. 
1898— Chic. 17; Pur. 0. 
1899— Chic. 44; Pur. 0. 
1900— Chic. 17; Pur. 0. 



CHICAGO— PURDUE. 

1901— Chic. 5; Pur. 5. 
1902 — Chic. 33; Pur. 0. 
1903— Chic. 22; Pur. 0. 
1904— Chic. 20; Pur. 0. 
1905 — Chic. 19; Pur. 0. 
1906— Chic. 39; Pur. 0. 



1907— Chic. 56; Pur. 0. 
1908— Chic. 39; Pur. 0. 
1909— Chic. 40; Pur. 0. 
1910— Chic. 14; Pur. 5. 
1911— Chic. 11; Pur. 3. 



1894— Wis. 30; Chic. 0. 
1895— Chic. 22; Wis. 12. 
1896— Wis. 24; Chic. 0. 
1897— Wis. 23; Chic. 8. 
1898— Chic. 6; Wis. 0. 
1899— Chic. 17; Wis. 0. 



CHICAGO— WISCONSIN. 

1900— Wis. 39; Chic. 5. 
1901— Wis. 35; Chic. 0. 
1902— Chic. 11; Wis. 0. 
1903— Chic. 15; Wis. 6. 
1904— Chic. IS; Wis. II. 



1905— Chic. 4; Wis. 0. 
1908— Chic. 18; Wis. 12. 
1909— Chic. 6; Wis. 6. 
1910— Wis. 10; Chic. 0. 
1911— Chic. 5; Wis. 0. 





*% 












i 


' * '~*T*^ 


B^H 


;. 




' 


PP^ 16 


l Hh 


; ' 


w 





1, Simpson; 2, Weatherill; 3, Douglass; 4, Smith; 5, Burns; 6, Lewis; 7, 
Wood; 8, Faulkner; 9, Pratt; 10, Kern; 11, King, Mgr. ; 12, Crosby; 13, 
Hinch; 14, Dale; 15, La Casee; 16, Hurley, Capt. 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE, BRUNSWICK, ME. 




Thompson; 8; Pendergast; 0, 

Mgr.; 13, Pratt; 14. Weir; 
Hamilton; 10. Grossman; 20, 



da-lit. 
Ladd; 10, Beach; 11. Hunt; 12, R< 
ir». Fraser; 16, Bagnell, Capt.; IT, Good; IS. 
Bo-vvler. 



COLBY COLLEGE. WATERYILLE. ME 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



195 



1892— Colby 12; Maine 0. 

Colby 30; Maine 4. 
1895— Colby 16; Maine 6. 

Colby 56; Maine 0. 
1896— Colby 10; Maine 0. 

Colby 4; Maine 0. 
1898— Colby 6; Maine 0. 
1899— Maine 26; Colbv 0. 

Maine 5; Colby 0. 

1891— Col. 6: Roch. 0. 
1892— Col. 16; Roch. 0. 
1897— Roch. 8; Col. 0. 
1900— Roch. 11; Col. 5. 
1901— Roch. 11; Col. 6. 



1891— Col. 22; Syr. 16. 
1892— No game. 
1893— Col. 58; Syr. 2. 
1894— Col. 32; Svr. 8. 
1895— Syr. 4; Col. 0. 



COLBY— MAINE. 

1900— Colby 5; Maine 0. 

Maine 18: Colby 0. 
1901— Maine 12; Colbv 0. 

Maine 29; Colbv 0. 
1902— Maine 6; Colbv 0. 

Maine 17; Colbv 5. 
1903— Maine 6; Colbv 5. 
1904— Colby 12; Maine 11. 

COLGATE— ROCHESTER. 

1902— Col. 22; ^och. 0. 
1903— Col. 23; Roch. 5. 
1904— Col. 20; Roch. 5. 
1905— Col. 53: Roch. 12. 
1906— Col. 18; Roch. 0. 

COLGATE— SYRACUSE. 

1896— Col. 6; Syr. 0. 
1897— Col. 6: Svr. 6. 
1902— Syr. 23; Col. 0. 
1903— Col. 10; Svr. 5. 
1904— Col. 11; Svr. 0. 



1905— Maine 16; Colby 0. 
1906— Maine 8; Colby 0. 
1907— Maine 8; Colby 0. 
1908— Colby 16; Maine 5. 
3909— Colby 17; Maine 6. 
1910— Maine 6; Colby 0. 
1911— Maine 20; Colby 0. 



1907— Col 41 ; Roch. 0. 
1909— Col. 21; Roch. 0. 
1910— Col. 6: Roch. 5. 
1911— Col. 11; Roch. 5. 
1893-4-5-6— No game. 



1905— Syr. 11; Col. 5. 
1906— Col 5; Svr. 0. 
1908— Col. 6; Svr. 0. 
1909— Col. 6; Svr. 5. 
1910— Col. 11; Syr. 6. 



COLORADO COLLEGE— UTAn. 

1905— Utah 42; Colo. 0. 1907-8-9— No games. 1911— Utah 18- Colo 6 

1906— Colo. 6; Utah 0. 1910— Colo. 21; Utah 17. 

COLORADO UNIVERSITY— UTAH. 
1905— Colo. 19; Utah 0. 1907— Utah 10; Colo. 0. 1910— Colo. 11; Utah 
1906— Colo. 45; Utah 5. 1908— Colo. 24; Utah 10. 1911— Colo. 9; Utah 0. " 



1890— Har. 77; Cor. 0. 
1891 — No game. 
1892— Har. 20; Cor. 14. 
1893— Har. 34; Cor. 0. 



1889— Cor. 66; Mich. 0. 
1890-^Cor. 20; Mich. 5. 
1891— Cor. 58; Mich. 12. 
Cor. 10; Mich. 0. 



CORNELL— HARVARD 
1894— Har. 22: Cor. 0. 
1895— Har. 25; Cor. 0. 
1896— Har. 13; Cor. 4. 
1897— Har. 24; Cor. 5. 

CORNELL— MICHIGAN. 

1892— Cor. 44; Mich. 0. 

Cor. 30; Mich. 10. 
1893— No game. 
1894— Cor. 22; Mich 0. 



1898-1908— No game. 
1909— Har. 18; Cor. 0. 
1910— Har. 27: Cor. 5. 
1911 — No game. 



1894— Mich. 12; Cor. 4. 
1895 to 1910— No games. 
1911— Cor. 6; Mich. 0. 



*898— Cor. 6; Ober. 0. 
1900 — Cor. 29; Ober. 0. 
1901— Cor 29; Ober. 0. 
1902— Cor. 57; Ober. 0. 

1893— U. of P. 50: C. 0. 
1894— U. of P. 6: C. 0. 
1895— U. of P. 46; C. 2. 
1896— TJ. of P. 32; C. 10. 
1897— U. of P. 4: C. 0. 
1898— U. of P. 12; C. 6. 
1899— U. of P. 29, C. 6. 



CORNELL— OBERLIN. 

1906— Cor. 25; Ober. 5. 
1907— Cor. 22; Ober. 5. 
1908— Cor. 23; Ober. 10. 



1909— Cor. 16; Ober. 6. 
1910— Cor. 0; Ober. 0. 
1911— Cor. 15; Ober. 3. 



CORNELL— PENNSYLVANIA. 



1900— U. of P. 27; C. 0. 
1901— C 24; U. of P. 6. 
1902^-U of P. 12; C. 11. 
1903— U. of P. 36; C. 0. 
1904— U. of P. 34; C. 0. 
1905— U. of P. 6; C. 5. 



1906— U of P. 0- C. 0. 
1907— U. of P. 12; C. 4. 
1908— U. of P. 17; C. 4. 
1909— U. of P. 17; C. 6. 
1910— U. of P. 12; C. 6. 
1911— U. of P. 21; C. 9. 



CORNELL— PENNSYLVANIA STATE. 
1893— Cor. 16; P.S. 0. iS97-^or. 45;JP.S. 0. 1908— P.S 10' Cor 4 

1911— P. S. 5; Cor. 0. ' 



1895— Cor. 0; P.S. 0. 



1907— P.S. 8; Cor. 




1 Getz Mar • 2, Pieper; 3, Gittings; 4, Davis; 5, Ellicott; 6, Gillet; 7, 
FuUon'capf. '8 DuB^ay;' 9,' Dorseyf 10, Chenoweth; 11, L fSft^pLoto' 
Branham; 13, Catlin; 14, Belt. Ilgenfntz, Fnoto. 

JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY, BALTIMORE, MD. 




1 Peet Trainer; 2, Sheldon; 3, Neilson; 4, Bnllivant; o, Biglow; 6, Shelton, 
7 Warner Mgr • 8, Hogg; 9, Ganlt; 10, Roberts; 11, Thompson; 12 Hay, 
13, jSSJ'fif Van 'Brofktin/Capt.; 15, Mahan; 1G, Brann; 17, Malcomb; 
18, Sullivan; 19, Enwright; 20, Ames. 

PHILLIPS ANDOVER ACADEMY, ANDOVER, MASS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



19T 



1882— Harvard 
1884— Har. 29; 
1886— Har. 70; 
1888— Har. 74; 
1889— Har. 38; 
1890— Har. 43; 
Har. 64; 
1891— Har. 16; 
1892— Har. 48; 



, 4 goals. 
Dart. 0. 
Dart. 0. 
Dart 0. 
Dart. 0. 
Dart. 0. 
Dart. 0. 
Dart. 0. 
Dart. 0. 



DARTMOUTH— HARVARD. 
19 touchdowns; Dartmouth, 0. 

1893 — Har. 16; Dart 0. 1903— Dart. 
Har. 36; Dart. 0. 1904— Har. 
1894— Har. 22 ; Dart. 0. 1905— Har. 
1895— Har. 4; Dart. 0. 1906— Har. 

'1897— Har. 13; Dart. 0. 1907— Dart. 
1898— Har. 21 ; Dart. 0. 1908— Har. 
1899— Har. 11; Dart. 0. 1909— Har. 
1901— Har. 27; Dart. 12. 1910— Har. 
1902— Har. 16; Dart. 6. 1911— Har. 



11; Har. 0. 
0; Dart. 0. 
6; Dart. 6. 
22; Dart. 9. 

22; Har. 0. 
6; Dart. 0. 
12; Dart. 3. 
18; Dart. 0. 
5. Dart. 3. 



DARTMOUTH— PRINCETON. 



1897— Prin. 30; Dart. 0. 

1898 to 1902— No games. 
1903— Prin. 17; Dart. 0. 
1904— No game. 



1905 — Dart. 6; Prin. 0. 
1906— Priii. 42; Dart. 0. 
1907 — No game. 
1908— Dart. 10; Prin. 6. 



1909— Prin. 6; Dart. 6. 
1910— Prin. 6; Dart. 0. 
1911— Prin. 3; Dart. 0. 



1900— Dart. 0; Ver. 0. 
1901— Dart. 22; Ver. 0. 
1902— Dart. 11 ; Ver. 0. 
1903— Dart. 36; Ver. 0. 



DARTMOUTH— VERMONT. 
1904— Dart. 37; Ver. 0. 1908— Dart. 11; Ver. 0. 



1905— Dart. 12; Ver. 0. 
1906— Dart. 8; Ver. 0. 
1907— Dart. 0; Ver. 0. 



1909— Dart. 0. Ver. 0. 

1910— Dart. 33; Ver. 0. 

1911— Dart. 12; Ver. 0. 



1883— Wms. 5; Dart. 2. 
1888— Dart. 36; Wms. 6. 
1889— Dart. 20; Wms. 9. 
1890— Wms. 6; Dart. 0. 
1891— Wms. 14; Dart. 6. 
1892— Dart. 24; Wms. 12., 
1893— Dart. 20; Wms. 0. 
1894— Dart. 10; Wms. 0. 



DARTMOUTH— WILLIAMS. 

1895— Dart. 10; Wms. 5. 1904— Dart. 11; Wms. 0. 

1896— Dart. 10; Wms. 0. 1905— Dart. 24; Wms. 0. 

1897— Dart. 52; Wms. 0. 1906— Dart. 0; Wms. 0. 

1898— Dart. 10; Wms. 6. 1908— Dart. 0; Wms. 0. 

1899— Wms. 12; Dart. 10. 1909— Dart. 18; Wms. 0. 

1901— Dart. 6; Wms. 2. 1910— Dart. 39; Wms. 0. 

1902— Dart. 18; Wms. 0. 1911— Dart. 23; Wms. 5. 
1903— Dart. 17; Wms. 0. 



DAVIDSON— NORTH CAROLINA. 
1898— N.C. 11; David. 0. 1902— N.C. 27; David. 0. 1908— N.C. 0; David. 0. 



1899— N.C. 10; David. 0. 
1901— N.C. 6; David. 0. 



1904— N.C. 0; David. 0. 
1906— N.C. 0; David. 0. 



1910— David. 6; N.C. 0. 
1911— N.C. 5; David. 0. 



DAVIDSON— SOUTH CAROLINA. 

1898— David. 6; S.C. 0. 1901— David. 12; S.C. 5. 1909— David. 29; S.C. 5. 
1899— David. 5; S.C. 0. 1903— S.C. 28; David. 12. 1910— David. 53; S.C. 0. 

1900— David. 5; S.C. 0. 1908— David. 22; S.C. 0. 1911— David. 10; S.C. 0. 



1901— Wit. 18; Den. 0. 
1902— Wit. 11; Den. 5. 



DENISON— WITTENBERG. 

1903— Den. 17; Wit. 0. 1910— Den. 31; Wit. 0. 

1905— Wit. 12; Den. 10. 1911— Den. 8; Wit. 0. 



1904— Utah 11; Den. 0. 
1905— Utah 12; Den. 0. 
1906— Utah 24; Den. 5. 

1886— Laf. 24; Dick. 5. 
1887— Laf. 12; Dick. 0. 
1890— Laf. 52; Dick. 0. 
1896— Laf. 18; Dick. 0. 
1897— Laf. 19; Dick. 0. 
1898— Dick. 12; Laf. 6. 



DENVER— UTAH. 
1907— Utah 24; Den. 0. 
1908— Den. 17; Utah 15. 

DICKINSON— LAFAYETTE. 
1899— Laf. 36; Dick. 0. 
1900— Laf. 10; Dick. 6. 
1902— Laf. 23; Dick. 0. 
1903— Dick. 35; Laf. 0. 
1906— Laf. 26; Dick. 6. 



1910— Utah 20; Den. 0. 
1911— Utah 0; Den. 0. 



1907— Laf. 31; Dick. 0. 
1908— Laf. 12; Dick. 0. 
1909— Laf. 5; Dick. 0. 
1910— Laf. 41; Dick. 0. 
1911— Laf. 6; Dick, 0. 




1, Bingham; 2, Renwick; 3, Herd; 4, Caldwell; 5, Brown; G. Kelly; <, 
Quiglev; 8, Castator; 9, Bolton; 10, Savage; 11, Shea; 12, McDougal; 13, 
Batten; 14, W. J. Bingham. Mgr. ; 13, Kirkpatrick; 16, Dickerman; 17, 
Neal; 18, Gilman. 

PHILLIPS EXETEPv ACADEMY, EXETER, N. H, 




1, Kafer, Coach; 2, McKenzie; 3, Shink; 4, UnderhM; 5 Hanford; 6 , Trask; 7; 
Fletcher- 8, Wilson, Coach; 9. Raymond. Head Coach; 10, Ryon 11, Badham ,12, 
Off; 13 Condon: 14, Walsh; 15, Fay: 16. Molten; 17, Biglow; 18, Colwell Coach; 19, 
Tancock 20 Smyth- 21 Hansel; 22, Silby; 23, Marr; 24, Kamm; 25, Tanner; 26, 
??anks; 27 ^ TapTn: 28, Ames; 29 Humbolt; 30. Kaufman; 32 Henderson; 33, Filton; 
?4 Tohnson- 35 Blodeet- 36, Rut-Lamen; 37, Matterson; 38, Tompson Mgr.; 39, 
Wiedemann, Capt ; 40, Eastern ; 41, Carter; 42, Shackerford; 43, Sparkes Coach; 
44 FosTer 45, Orvis; 46, Paul; 47, Colwell; 48, Hyde; 49, Sternbury; 50, Boll 
LAWRENCEYILLE (N. J.) SCHOOL. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



19$> 



GEORGETOWN— VIRGINIA. 



1889— Va. 32; Geor. 0. 
1890 — No game. 
1891— Geor. 4; Va. 4. 
1892— Geor. 28; Va. 24. 
1893— Va. 58; Geor. 0. 
1894 to 1897 — No game. 



1898— Va. 12; Geor. 0. 
1S99— Geor. 0; Va. 0. 
1900— Geor. 10; Va. 0. 
1901— Geor. 17; Va. 16. 
1902 to 1905 — No game. 
1906— Va. 12; Geor. 0. 



1907— Va. 28; Geor. 6. 
1908— Va. 5; Geor. 0. 
1909— Va. 21; Geor. 0. 
1910— Geor. 15; Va. 0. 
1911— Geor. 9; Va. 0. 



1893— Ham. 14; Union 6. 
1897 — Ham. 4; Union 4. 
1899 — Ham. 0; Union 0. 
1902— Ham. 31; Union 0. 



HAMILTON— UNION. 
1903— Ham. 28; Union 0. 
1904— Ham. 5; Union 0. 
1905— Ham. 17; Union 0. 
1907 — Ham. 6; Union 0. 



1908— Union 18; Ham. 6. 
1909— Ham. 0; Union 0. 
1910— Ham. 0; Union 0. 
1911— Ham. 19; Union 0. 



HARVARD— PENNSYLVANIA. 

1881 — Harvard, 2 goals, 2 touchdowns; University of Pennsylvania, 6 safeties. 

1883— H. 4; U. of'P. 0. 

1884— U. of P. 4; H. 0. 

1885 — No game. 

1886— H. 28 ; U. of P. 0. 

1888— H. 50; U. of P. 0. 

1890— H. 35; U. of P. 4. 

1893— H. 26; U. of P. 4. 



1894— U. of P. 18; H. 4. 
1895— U. of P. 17; H. 14. 
1896— U. of P. 8; H. 6. 
1897— U. of P. 15; H. 6. 
1898— H. 10; U. of P. 0. 
1899— H. 16; U. of P. 0. 
1900— H. 17; U. of P. 5. 



1901— H. 33; U. of P. 6. 
1902— H. 11; U. of P. 0. 
1903— H. 17; U. of P. 10. 
1904— U. of P. 11; H. 0. 
1905— U. of P. 12; H. 6. 
1906 — to 1911 — No games- 



HARVARD— PRINCETON. 
1877 — Harvard, 1 goal, 2 touchdowns ; Princeton, 1 touchdown. 
Princeton, 1 goal, 1 touchdown; Harvard, 2 touchdowns. 
1878 — Princeton, 1 touchdown; Harvard, 0. 
1879 — Princeton, 1 goal ; Harvard, 0. 

1880— Princeton, 2 goals, 2 touchdowns; Harvard, 1 goal, 1 touchdown. 
1881 — Princeton, 1 safety; Harvard, 1 safety. 

1882 — Harvard, 1 goal, 1 touchdown; Princeton, 1 goal, 1 touchdown. 
1883— Prin. 26; Har. 7. 1887— Har. 12; Prln. 0. 1895— Prin. 12; Har. 4. 
1884— Prin. 34; Har. 6. 1888— Prin. 18; Har. 6. 1896— Prin. 12; Har. 0. 
1886— Prln. 12; Har. 0. 1889— Prin. 41; Har. 15. 1911— Prin. 8; Har. 6. 

Notes — The second game of 1877 was won by Princeton ("a goal kickec? 
from touchdown taking precedence over 4 touchdowns"). The game of 1882" 
was won by Harvard, whose goal was from the field, while Princeton's goal 
followed a touchdown, the former being superior to the latter. 



HARVARD— YALE. 
1875 — Harvard, 4 goals; Yale, 0. 
1876 — Yale, 1 goal; Harvard, 0. 
1878— Yale, 1 goal; Harvard, 0. 
1879— Yale, 0; Harvard, 0. 
1880 — Yale, 1 goal. 1 touchdown; Harvard, 0. 
1881— Yale, 0; Harvard, 4 safeties. 
1882 — Yale, 1 goal, 4 touchdowns; Harvard, 2 safeties. 



1883— Yale 23; Har. 2. 
1885— Yale 48; Har. 0. 
1886— Yale 29; Har. 4. 
1887— Yale 17: Har. 8. 
1889— Yale 6; Har. 0. 
1890— Har. 12; Yale 6. 
1891— Yale 10; Har. 0. 
1892— Yale 6; Har. 0. 
1893— Yale 6; Har. 0. 

Notes — The game of 1875 was plaved under a modification of the Rugby 
Union code, known as the "Concessionary Rules." In the game of 1876^. 



1891— Yale 12; Har. 4. 
1897— Yale 0: Har. 0. 
1898— Far. 17: Yale 0. 
1899— Yale 0: Har. 0. 
1900— Yale 28 ; Har. 0. 
1901— Har. 22; Yale 0. 
1902— Yale 23; Har. 0. 
1903— Yale 16; Har. 0. 



1904— Yale 12; Har. 0. 
1905— Yale 6: Har. 0. 
1906— Yale 6: Har. 0. 
1907— Yale 12; Har. 0. 
1908— Har. 4: Yale 0. 
1909— Yale 8: Har. 0. 
1910— Yale 0; Har. 0. 
1911— Yale 0; Har. 0. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



201 



played under the Rugby Union Rules, touchdowns were not counted in com- 
puting the score. Safeties became a scoring play in 1881 under a rule which 
provided: "In a game, otherwise a tie, the side which makes four or more 
safeties less than their opponents shall win the game." In 1882 the rule 
was, "In scoring, four touchdowns shall take precedence over a goal from 
Held and two safeties shall be equal to a touchdown." Numerical scoring 
was established in 1883. No games were played in 1884, 1888, 1895 and 1896. 



1884— Hav. 36; Leh. 12. 
1885— Hav. 24; Leh. 8. 
188$— Leh. 18; Hav. 4. 
1888— Leh. 16; Hav. 6. 
1889— Leh. 60; Hav. 0. 



HAVERFORD— LEHIGH. 

1900— Leh. 11; Hav. 10. 
1901— Leh. 21; Hav. 5. 
1902— Leh. 39; Hav. 0. 
1904— Hav. 6; Leh, 0. 
1905— Leh. 6; Hav. 5. 



1906— Hav. 5; Leh. 0. 
1907— Hav. 11; Leh. 4. 
1909— Leh. 18; Hav. 0. 
1910— Hav. 5; Leh. 0. 
1911— Leh. 12; Hav. 0. 



1899— Whit. 16; Idaho 6. 
1901— Whit. 10; Idaho 0. 
1902— Whit. 16; Idaho 0. 
1903— Idaho 36; Whit. 0. 



IDAHO— WHITMAN. 
1904— Idaho 21 ; Whit. 0. 
1905— Idaho 9; Whit. 0. 
1906— Whit. 6; Idaho 5. 
1907— Idaho 11; Whit. 0. 



1908— Whit. 11; Idaho 0. 
1909— Whit. 30; Idaho 6. 
1910— Idaho 5; Whit. 0. 
1911— Idaho 5; Whit. 0. 



1899— Ind. 5; 111. 0. 
1900—111. 0; Ind. 0. 
1901—111. 18; Ind. 0. 
1902—111. 47; Ind. 0. 



ILLINOIS— INDIANA. 
1903— Ind. 17; 111. 0. 
1904—111. 10; Ind. 0. 
1907— 111. 10; Ind. 6. 
1908—111. 10; Ind. 0. 



1909—111. 6; 
1910—111. 3; 



Ind. 5. 
Ind. 0. 



1911—111. 0; Ind. 0. 



1898—111. 11; Minn. 10. 
1900— Minn. 23; 111. 0. 



ILLINOIS— MINNESOTA. 

1901— Minn. 18; 111. 0. 1903— Minn. 32; 111. 0. 



1902— Minn. 17; 111. 5. 



1911— Minn. 11; 111. 0. 



1890— Purdue 62; 111. 0. 
1892— Purdue 12; 111. 6. 
1893—111. 26; Purdue 26. 
1894— Purdue 22; 111. 2. 
1895— Purdue 6; 111. 2. 
1896—111. 4; Purdue 4. 
1897—111. 32 ; Purdue 4. 



ILLINOIS- 
1899 — Purdue 
1900—111. 17; 
1901—111. 28; 
1902—111. 29; 
1903—111. 24; 
1904—111. 24; 
1905— Purdue 



-PURDUE. 
5; 111. 0. 
Purdue 5. 
Purdue 6. 
Purdue 5. 
Purdue 0. 
Purdue 6. 
29; 111. 0. 



1906—111. 5; Purdue 0. 
1907- -111. 21; Purdue 4. 
1908—111. 15; Purdue 6. 
1909—111. 24; Purdue 6 . 
1910—111. 11; Purdue 0. 
1911—111. 12; Purdue 3. 



1893— Ind. 64; Purdue 0. 
1897— Purdue 20; Ind. 6. 
1898— Purdue 14; Ind. 0. 
1899 — Ind. 17; Purdue 5. 
1900— Ind. 24; Purdue 5. 



1891— Kan. 22; Mo. 10. 
1892— Kan. 12; Mo. 4. 
1893— Kan. 12; Mo. 12. 
1894— Kan. 18; Mo. 12. 
1895— Mo. 10; Kan. 6. 
1896— Kan. 30; Mo. 0. 
1897— Kan. 16; Mo. 0. 



INDIANA— PURDUE. 
1901— Ind. 11; Purdue 6. 1908— Ind. 10; Purdue 4. 
1902— Purdue 39; Ind. 0. 1909— Ind. 36; Purdue 3. 
1904— Purdue 27; Ind. 0. 1910— Ind. 15; Purdue 0. 
1905— Ind. 11; Purdue 11. 1911— Purdue 12; Ind. 5. 



. KANSAS— MISSOURI. 
1898— Kan. 12; Mo. 0. 
1899— Kan. 36; Mo. 6. 
1900— Kan. 6; Mo. 6. 
1901— Mo. 18; Kan. 12. 
1902— Kan. 17; Mo. 5. 
1903— Kan. 5; Mo. 0. 
1904— Kan. 24; Mo. 0. 



1905— Kan. 24; Mo. 0. 
1906— Kan. 0; Mo. 0. 
1907— Kan. 4; Mo. 0. 
1908— Kan. 10; Mo. 4. 
1909— Mo. 12; Kan. 6. 
1910— Kan. 5; Mo. 5. 
1911— Kan. 3; Mo. 3. 




1, Hotcbkin; 2, Spalding; 3, James Van Ingen; 4, Bobbins; 5, Bayless; 6, 
Skinner; 7, Warner; 8, John Van Ingen; 9, McCain; 10, Church, Mgr. ; 11, 
Sparks, Trainer; 12, Reynolds, Coach; 13, Bassett: 14, Wood; 15, Barrmore, 
Capt.; 16, Barker; 17, Hall. 

HOBART COLLEGE, GENEVA, N. Y. 






m- w* ^m m y , , ". t 



1, Nixon; 2, Von Egglofstein; :;. Huntley; 4. Zimmele; 5. Andradej 6, Brown: 
7, Coleman; S. Hamilton, Asst. Mgr.; 9, Torrance; 10, Comfort: 11, Dutcher; 
12, Bristol; 13, Weiner; 14. Holm; 1."), Henderson. Mgr.; 16, Moore: 17, 
Veseley; 18, Mackay; 19. Brennan, Capt.: 20. Ilenniberger; 21, Eliffe; 22, 
Crawford. NEW yoRI - UNIVERSITY. White > Pboto - 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



203 



1884— Laf 

Laf. 
1885— Laf. 

Laf. 
1886— Laf. 

Laf. 
1887— Leh. 

Laf. 
1888— Leh. 

Leh. 
1889— Leh. 

Laf. 
1890— Leh. 

Leh. 
1891— Leh. 



56; Leh. 0. 
34; Leh. 4. 
6; Leh. 6. 
16; Leh. 12. 
12; Leh. 0. 
4; Leh. 0. 
10; Laf. 4. 
6; Leh. 0. 
6; Laf. 4. 
10; Laf. 0. 
16; Laf. 10. 
6; Leh. 6. 
30; Laf. 0. 
60; Laf. 6. 
22; Laf. 4. 



LAFAYETTE 
1891— Leh. 6; 

Leh. 16 
1892— Laf. 4; 

Leh. 15 
1893— Leh. 22 

Leh. 10 
1894— Laf. 28 

Leh. 11 
1895— Laf. 22 

Laf. 14 
1897— Laf. 34 

Laf. 22 
1898— Leh. 22 

Laf. 11 
1899— Laf. 17 



-LEHIGH. 
Laf. 2. 
; Laf. 2. 
Leh. 0. 

Laf. 6. 
; Laf. 6. 
; Laf. 0. 
; Leh. 0. 

Laf. 8. 

Leh. 12. 
; Leh. 6. 

Leh. 0. 
; Leh. 0. 
; Laf. 0. 
; Leh. 5. 
; Leh. 0. 



1899— Laf. 
1900— Laf. 

Laf. 
1901— Laf. 

Laf. 
1902— Leh. 
1903— Leh. 
1904— Laf. 
1905— Laf. 
1906— Laf. 
1907— Laf. 
1908— Leh. 
1909— Laf. 
1910— Laf. 
1911— Laf. 



35; Leh. 0. 
34; Leh. 0. 
18; Leh. 0. 
29; Leh. 0. 
41; Leh. 0. 
6; Laf. 0. 
12; Laf. 6. 
40; Leh. 6. 
53; Leh. 0. 
33; Leh. 0. 
22; Leh. 5. 
11; Laf. 5. 
21; Leh. 0. 
14; Leh. 0. 
11; Leh. 0. 



LAFAYETTE— PENNSYLVANIA. 
1882 — University of Pennsylvania, 1 goal; Lafayette, 2 safeties. 



1883— U. of P. 48; L. 6. 
1884— U. of P. 21; L. 0. 
1885— U. of P. 30; L. 22. 

U. of P. 54; L. 10. 
1886— L. 12; U. of P. 0. 

U. of P. 20; L. 10. 
1887— L. 20; U. of P. 0. 
1888— L. 12; U. of P. 6. 

U. of P. 50; L. 0. 
1889— L. 10; U. of P. 8. 



1889— L. 23; U. of P. 14. 
1892— U. of P. 8; L. 6. 

U. of P. 10; L. 4. 
1893— U. of P. 82; L. 0. 
1894— U. of P. 26; L. 0. 
1895— U. of P. 30; L. 0. 
1896— L. 6; U. of P. 4. 
1897— U. of P. 46; L. 0. 
189&— U. of P. 32; L. 0. 
1899— L. 6; U. of P. 0. 



1900— U. of P. 
1904— U. of P. 
1905— U. of P. 
1906— U. of P. 
1907— U. of P. 
1908— U. of P. 
1909— U. of P. 
1910— U. of P. 
1911— U. of P. 



12; L. 5. 
22; L. 0. 
6; L. 6. 
0; L. 0. 
15; L. 0. 
3i: L. 4. 
6; L. 6. 
18; L. 0. 
23; L. 6. 



1901— Laf. 5; Syr. 0. 



LAFAYETTE— SYRACUSE. 
1906— Syr. 12; Laf. 4. 1911— Laf. 10; Syr. 0. 

1907— Laf. 4; Syr. 4. 



LOUISIANA— MISSISSIPPI A. AND M. 

1905— La. 11; Miss. 0. 1908— La. 50; Miss. 0. 1911— Miss. 6; La. 0. 
1906— La. 0; Miss. 0. 1909— La. 15; Miss. 0. 
1907— La. 23; Miss. 11. 1910— Miss. 4; La. 0. 



1895— Miami 12; Wit. 4. 
1899— Miami 6; Wit. 0. 
1900— Wit. 33; Miami 0. 
1901— Wit. 12; Miami 0. 



MIAMI— WITTENBERG. 

1902— Miami 11; Wit. 0. 1910— Miami 19; Whit. 0. 

1904— Wit. 68; Miami 0. 1911— Miami 6; Wit. 3. 

19C5— Wit. 35; Miami 0. 

1906— Wit. 11 ; Miami 0. 



1897— Mich. 36; O.S. 0. 
1900— Mich. 0; O.S. 0. 
1901— Mich. 21; O.S. 0. 
1902— Mich. 86; O.S. 0. 
1903— Mich. 36; O.S. 0. 



MICHIGAN— OHIO STATE. 



1904— Mich. 31; O.S. 0. 
1905— Mich. 40; O.S. 0. 
1906— Mich. 6; O.S. 0. 
1907— Mich. 22; O.S. 0. 
1908— Mich. 10; O.S. 6. 



1909— Mich. 33; O.S. 6. 
1910— Mich. 3; O.S. 3. 
1911— Mich. 19; O.S. 0. 



MICHIGAN— PENNSYLVANIA. 
1899— U. of P. 11; M. 10. 1908— U. of P. 29: M. 0. 1911- 
1906— U. of P. 17; M. 0. 1909— M. 12: U. of P. 6. 
1907— U. of P. 6; M. 0. 1910— M. 0; U. of P. 0. 



-M. 11; U. of P. 9. 



1908— Syr. 28; Mich. 4. 



MICHIGAN— SYRACUSE. 

1909— Mich. 44; Syr. 0. 1911— Mich. 6; Syr. 6. 

1910— Mich. 11; Syr. 0. 




1, Collings; 2, Schott; 3, Dr. McCurdy; 4, Deaver; 5, Kelley; 6, Mann; 7, 
Ireland, Mgr. ; 8, Brinkman, Asst. Mgr. ; 9, Swenson; 10, Merner; 11, Gregory; 
12, Metzler, Capt. ; 13, Hazel; 14, Home; 15, Doane; 16, Fradd. 

SPRINGFIELD (MASS.) COLLEGE. 




1, Potter, Mgr.; 2, Donnelly, Coach; 3, Armour, Asst. Mgr.; 4, Walker; 5, 
Drake; 6, Brown; 7, Steele; 8. Shopfer; 9, Cole; 10, Fritch; 11. Baxter; 12, 
Wulf; 13, Power, Capt.; 14, Howard; 15, Halligan; 16, Lewis; 17, Kloss. 

WORCESTER (MASS.) POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



205 



1892— Mich 10; Wis. 6. 
1893— Wis. 34; Mich. 18. 
1894-5-6-7-8— No game. 
1899— Wis. 17; Mich. 5. 



1890— Minn. 63: Wis. 0. 
1891— Minn. 26; Wis. 12. 
1892— Minn. 32; Wis. 4. 
1893— Minn. 40; Wis. 0. 
1894— Wis. 6; Minn. 0. 
1895 — Miun. 14; Wis. 10. 
1896— Wis 6; Minn. 0. 



MICHIGAN— WISCONSIN. 

1900-1— No game. 1904— Mich. 28; Wis. 0. 



1902— Mich. 6; Wis. 0. 
1903— Mich. 16; Wis. 0. 



1905— Mich. 12; Wis. 0. 
1906 to 1911— No games. 



MINNESOTA— WISCONSIN. 



1897— Wis. 39; Minn. 0. 
1898— Wis. 28; Minn. 0. 
1899— Wis. 19; Minn. 0. 
1900— Minn. 6; Wis. 5. 
1901— Wis. 18; Minn. 0. 
1902— Minn. 11; Wis. 0. 
1903— Minn. 17; Wis. 0. 



1904— Minn. 28; Wis. 0. 
1905— Wis. 16; Minn. 12. 
1907— Minn. 17; Wis. 17. 
1908 — Wis. 5; Minn. 0. 
1909— Minn. 34; Wis. 6. 
1910— Minn. 28; Wis. 0. 
1911— Minn. 6; Wis. 6. 



1904— St. L. 17; Mo. 0. 



MISSOURI— ST. LOUIS. 

1905— St. L. 17; Mo. 0. 1911— St. L. 5; Mo. 0. 
1910— St. L. 3; Mo. 0. 



MONTANA- 
1901— M. A. 31: Mont. 0. 
1902— M. A. 30; Mont. 0. 
1903— M. A. 13; Mont. 6. 
1904— Mont. 79; M.A. 0. 



MONTANA AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 
1908— Mont. 0; M.A. 0. 1910— Mont. 0; M.A. 0. 



M.A. 5; Mont. 0. 
1909— Mont. 3; M.A. 0. 
Mont. 15; M.A. 5. 



Mont. 10; M.A. 0. 



MONTANA— STATE SCHOOL OF MINES. 
1903— Mines 19; Mont. 0. 1908— Mont. 0; Mines 0. 

Mines 23; Mont. 0. Mont. 24; Mines 0. 

1907— Mont. 12; Mines 0. 1909— Mont. O; Mines 0. 
Mont. 24; Mines 0. 



1910— Mont. 8; Mines 0. 
Mont. 3; Mines 0. 
1911— Mont. 12; Mines 0. 



NORTHWESTERN— WISCONSIN. 



1891— Wis. 40; N.W. 0. 

Wis. 0; N.W. 0. 
1892— Wis. 20; N.W. 6. 
1893— Wis. 26; N.W. 6. 
1895— Wis. 12; N.W. 6. 



1892— Ober. 40; O.S. 0. 
Ober. 50; O.S. 0. 
1893— Ober. 38; O.S. 10. 
1895— Ober. 12; O.S. 6. 
1896— Ober. 16; O.S. 0. 
1897— Ober. 44; O.S. 0. 



1896— Wis. 6; N.W. 6. 
1897— Wis. 22; N.W. 0. 
1898— Wis. 47; N.W. 0. 
1902— Wis. 51; N.W. 8. 

OBERLIN— OHIO STATE. 

1899— O.S. 6; Ober. 0. 
1900— O.S. 17; Ober. 0. 
1901— Ober, 6; O.S. 0. 
1903— O.S. 27; Ober. 5. 
1904— Ober. 4; O.S. 2. 
1905— O.S. 36; Ober. 0. 



1903— Wis. 6; N.W. 6. 

1909— Wis. 21; N.W. 11. 
1910— Wis. 0; N.W. 0. 
1911— Wis. 28; N.W. 3. 



1906— O.S. 6; Ober. 0. 
1907^-0. S. 22; Ober, 10. 
1908— O.S. 14; Ober. 12. 
1909— Ober. 26; O.S. 6. 
1910— Ober. 0; O.S. 0. 
1911— Ober. 0; O.S. 0. 



1891— Ober. 12; Res. 6. 

Res. 18; Ober. 8. 
1892— Ober. 38; Res. 8. 

Ober. 16; Res. 0. 
1893— Ober. 40; Res. 4. 
1894— Res. 22; Ober. 4. 
1895— Ober. 12; Res. 0.. 
1896— Ober. 4; Res. 0. 

Ober. 6; Res. 6. 



1903— Ober. 39: Woos. 0. 
1904— Ober. 6; Woos. 0. 
1905— Woos. 10; Ober. 5. 



OBERLIN— RESERVE. 
1897— Ober. 6; Res. 6. 
1898— Ober. 11; Res. 0. 
1899— Res. 6; Ober. 0. 
1900— Ober. 6; Res. 5. 
1901— Ober. 11; Res. 6. 
1902— Ober. 16; Res. 12. 
1903— Ober. 63; Res. 0. 
1904— Ober. 12; Res. 12. 



1905— Res. 10; Ober. 0. 
1906— Ober. 0; Res. 0. 
1907— Ober. 16; Res. 0. 
1908— Res. 12; Ober. 5. 
1909— Ober. 20; Res. 0. 
1910— €ber. 8; Res. 6. 
1911— Ober. 9; Res. 0. 



OBERLIN— WOOSTER. 

1906— Woos. 13; Ober. 0. 1911— Ober. 20; Woos. 0. 
1907— Ober. 27; Woos. 10. 
1910— Ober. 20; Woos. 0. 




1, H. Gargon, Coach; 2, Gay; 3, Pierce; 4, Bergamini; 5. Twing; 6, Julie; 
7, Glander; 8, Johnson; 9, Cooper; 10, VanWinkle; 11, Barr, Asst. Mgr. ; 
12, Bowen, Mgr.; 13, Todd; 14, Foster; 15, MacGovern; 10, Alverson, Capt. ; 
17, Titsworth; 18, Toohey; 19, MacCullum; 20, Robinson; 21, Martin: 22, 
Hotaling; 23, Elmendorf; 24, White. White, Photo. 

RUTGERS COLLEGE. NEW 7 BRUNSWICK, N. J. 



K.K- •!.-,*.-. %i 




1, Magor; 2, Fenton; 3, McKelvy; 4. Kuys; 5, Inglis, Coach; 6, Kinloch; 7, 
Ryan; 8. Praeger; 9, Gallagher; 10, Booth; 11, Schutz; 12. Homer, Mgr.; 
13, Dike; 14, Spear; 15, Turner; 10, Church, Capt.; 17, Watkins; 18, Barr. 

Lloyd, Photo. 
RENSSELAER POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, TROY, N. Y= 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE. 



207 



OHIO WESLEY AN— WITTENBERG. 



1894— Wit. 24; O.W. 0. 
1895— Wit. 12; O.W. 6. 
1897— O.W. 46; Wit. 0. 
1898— O.W. 6; Wit. 5. 



1899- 
1900- 
1901- 



-O.W 
-O.W 
-O.W 



40; Wit. 0. 
5; Wit. 5. 
12; Wit. 5. 



1902— O.W. 10; Wit. 



1905— Wit. 16; O.W. 11. 
1906— O.W. 6; Wit. 0. 
1910— O.W T . 39; Wit. 0. 
1911— O.W. 31; Wit. 0. 



1900— Tex. 28; Okla. 2. 
1901— Tex. 12; Okla. 6. 
Tex. 11; Okla. 0. 
1902— Tex. 23; Okla 0. 
1903— Okla. 6. Tex. 6. 



1900— Ore. 43; Wash. 0. 
1901-2 — No game. 
1903— Wash. 6; Ore. 5. 
1904— Ore. 18; Wash. 0. 



OKLAHOMA— TEXAS. 

1904— Tex. 40; Okla. 10. 
1905— Okla. 2; Tex. 0. 
1906— Tex. 10; Okla. 9. 
1907— Tex. 29; Okla. 10. 



1908— Okla. 50; Tex. 0. 
1909— Tex. 30; Okla. 0. 
1910— Okla. 3; Tex. 0. 
1911— Okla. 6; Tex. 3. 



OREGON— WASHINGTON. 

1905— Ore. 12; Wash. 12. 1908— Wash. 15; Ore. 0. 
1906— Ore. 16; Wash. 6. 1909— Wash. 20; Ore. 6. 
1907— Ore. 6; Wash. 0. 1910-11— No games. 



PENNSYLVANIA— PENNSYLVANIA STATE. 



1890— P. S. 20; U.P. 0. 
1892— U. P. 20; P.S. 0. 
1893— U.P. 18; P.S. 6. 
1895— U.P. 35; P.S. 4. 
1896— U.P. 21; P.S. 0. 
1897— U.P. 24; P.S. 0. 



1898— U.P. 40; P.S. 0. 
1899— U.P. 47; P.S. 0. 
1900— U.P. 17; P.S. 5. 
1901— U.P. 23; P.S. 0. 
1902— U.P. 17; P.S. 0. 
1903— U.P. 39; P.S. 0. 



1904— U.P. 6; P.S. 0. 
3907— U.P. 28; P.S. 0. 
1908— U.P. 6; P.S. 0. 
1909— U.P. 3; P.S. 3. 
1910— U.P. 10; P.S. 0. 
1911— P.S. 22; U.P. 6. 



PENNSYLVANIA— PRINCETON. 

1876 — Princeton, 6 goals; University of Pennsylvania, 0. 

Princeton, 6 goals; University of Pennsylvania, 0. 
1878 — Princeton, 2 goals, 4 touchdowns; University of Pennsylvania, 0. 

Princeton, 2 goals, 4 touchdowns; University of Pennsylvania, 1 goal. 
1879 — Princeton, 6 goals, 4 touchdowns; Univ. of Pennsylvania, 0. 
1880 — Princeton, 1 touchdown; University of Pennsylvania, 0. 
1881 — Princeton, 7 goals, 5 touchdowns; University of Pennsylvania, 0. 

Princeton, 4 goals, 6 touchdowns; University of Pennsylvania, 0. 
1882 — Princeton, 10 goals, 4 touchdowns; University of Pennsylvania, 0. 

Princeton, 8 goals, 4 touchdowns; University of Pennsylvania, 0. 



1883— P. 39; U. of P. 6. 
1884— P. 31; U. of P. 0. 
1885— P. 57; U. of P. 0. 

P. 76; U. of P. 10. 

P. 80; U. of P. 10. 
1886— P. 28; U. of P. 6. 

P. 30; U. of P. 0. 

P. 35; U. of P. 0. 



1887- 



-P. 95; U. of P. 0. 

P. 61 ; U. of P. 0. 

P. 48; U. of P. 0. 
-P. 4; U. of P. 0. 

P. 63; U. of P. 0. 

P. 38; U. of P. 0. 
1889— P. 72; U. of P. 4. 



1888- 



1890— P. 6; U. of P. 0. 
P. 18; U. of P. 0. 
1891— P. 24; U. of P. 0. 
1892— U. of P. 6; P. 4. 
1893— P. 4; U. of P. 0. 
1894— U. of P. 12; P. 0. 
1895 to 1911— No games. 



PEN NS YL V ANI A— YALE. 



1879 — -Yale. 3 goals. 5 touchdowns; University of Pennsylvania, 0. 

1880 — Yale, 8 goals, 1 touchdown; University of Pennsylvania, 0. 

1885 — Yale. 4 goals, 7 touchdowns; Univ. of Pennsylvania, 1 goal, 2 safeties. 

1886 — Yale, 8 goals, 7 touchdowns: University of Pennsylvania, 0. 

1887 — Yale, 6 goals. 3 touchdowns; University of Pennsvlvania, 1 safety. 

1888— Y. 50; U. of P. 0. 1891— Y. 48; U. of P. 0. 1893— Y. 14; U. of P. 6. 

1889— Y. 20; U. of P. 10. 1892— Y. 28; U. of P. 0. 1894 to 1911— No games. 

1890— Y. 60; U. of P. 0. 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE— PITTSBURGH. 
1904— Pitts. 22; P.S. 5. 1907— Pitts. 6; P.S. 0. 1910— Pitts. 11; P.S. 0. 

1908— P.S. 12; Pitts. 6. 1911— P.S. 3; Pitts. 0. 
1909— P.S. 5; Pitts. 0. 



1905— P.S. 6; Pitts. 0. 
1906— P.S. 6; Pitts. 0. 





i 




; ^* A A .<£ * 


- 


- 


:- /" * ' ^ ** -~ - v -* - - -.,. ^ 


r " v r :i 



1, Weber, Trainer; 2, McDonnell; 3, Zachery; 4, Woodward; 5, Trotter; 6, 
Wagner; 7, Dempsey; 9, Silk: 10, Freixas; 11, W. Cronin; 12, Burke; 13, 
O'Sullivan; 14. Finn. Mgr. ; 15, LaBonte; 16, MacManus; 17, Mansuy; 18, 
Montgomery; 19, Robinson; 20, Butler; 21, McGi